Tag: study abroad (page 1 of 5)

“On Connections & Croissants” by Lauren Mottel

The morning sun greets you from its climb in the sky as you exit the train station, backlit by clear blue skies and seagulls circling overhead. You don’t even have to think as the click of your boots on the pavement guide you across the street to a small storefront with an orange awning. As you cross the threshold, an 8-bit rendition of “Für Elise” announces your presence to the display case of croissants, torsades aux pommes, chocolate muffins, and other treasured pastries. And there, before you and your friends can take a half-step further into the bakery, the owner excitedly walks out from the back kitchen exclaiming, Les filles! Bonjour, les filles! and ushering the cashier away so she can select our pastries for us with a grin. 

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“Springing Back to Campus” by Chris Hope

With the end of winter break and, for many, Winter Session classes, comes the spring semester. The spring semester marks a nice return to campus to see friends again, and even as a break from the break! I’m glad to have had the long break; however, since my winter study abroad was canceled, I had that itch to return to the groove of campus and the classes I enjoy. What’s even more poignant about this spring is the return of the student body altogether. Many of us haven’t experienced a full, in-person spring semester either at all or since spring 2019. My first spring semester was cut short by COVID’s beginnings, and in my second spring, I happened to have a single on-campus class, allowing me to be here last year. Because being on-campus all spring long is new for so many students, here are some ways to really take advantage of the spring semester no matter your year. Continue reading

“this is me trying” by Alex Stone

This past year has been very isolating, physically as well as emotionally. I remember how much in disbelief I was when we got the email last spring saying that we had to go home and take classes online for the rest of the semester. I honestly believed that by the summer, life would be back to normal. I believed that I would be returning to campus in the fall and seeing my friends very soon. I did not picture spending many long months in quarantine, isolated from everyone. I did not imagine the toll this would take on my mental health. I did not expect to feel so anxious, lonely, and fearful of the future. But something else I didn’t expect was to be listening to three new albums by Taylor Swift. This past year, Taylor Swift released the albums folklore and evermore, and just recently, her 2008 album, Fearless, but rebranded to Fearless (Taylor’s Version). I do not know if it was fate or some higher power that knew I needed these albums when I did, but every single one was released right when I needed her music the most. Continue reading

“Are Parisian Stereotypes True?” by Hayley Whiting

After spending my fall semester in Paris on a UD study abroad program, I definitely feel that I was able to become part of the city, rather than a tourist, which was a rewarding and fun experience. Thanks to spending three months there, I came away with a better understanding of the people, culture, and day-to-day life of the city. Below, I affirm some Parisian stereotypes, challenge others, and offer more observations from my time in Paris! (Disclaimer: I refer to Parisians specifically instead of French people because I only lived in Paris, but it is possible that these observations could be true for other parts of France as well! All of these views are also based on my own opinions.)

 

Stereotype: Parisians are arrogant and rude

In my experience, Parisians have been very helpful, respectful, and kind. Even when I traveled to Paris with my family four years ago, while we were walking around on the street with our luggage looking for our Airbnb, a lady stopped to ask if we needed help and gave us directions. That same trip, a man helped my sister carry her suitcase up the metro stairs. During my time studying abroad, I always had positive interactions with people. For example, an older lady in my apartment building always stopped to talk with me, and restaurant servers, museum employees, and retail workers were always polite. Continue reading

“What I Gained from Studying Abroad for a Semester” by Hayley Whiting

When I graduate and look back at my time at UD, I know that studying abroad will be one of the best experiences I will take away from my four years as an undergraduate. My experience offered a completely unique opportunity to not only explore a new place but also to get to know myself. Here is what I gained from studying abroad in Paris for a semester!

First and foremost, my semester abroad strengthened me as individual. Before my trip, I had to go through the extensive visa process by following all of the steps and gathering all the needed documents, so, with determination, I was able to successfully complete the process on my own. Also, although I have flown with my family before, I flew on my own for the first time going to Paris, and then three more times for my fall break in Italy and my trip back to the U.S. It was rewarding knowing I could navigate the airport process by myself instead of relying on someone else! I also learned how to get around the city on my own. Once I got to Paris, it took me a few tries, but I quickly was able to figure out the metro system and was soon jumping on and off, making transfers, and following the signs in the underground passageways without a problem (but with the help of Google Maps, which is not only useful for metro routes but also for walking directions). I also really appreciated having my own unique experience exploring the city. I enjoyed many days jumping on the metro and choosing from the enormous selection of sights to see in Paris. I also decided to write in a journal consistently while I was there, which I have never done before, so it was nice to reflect on my day-to-day experiences and record my thoughts. Continue reading

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