Author: lmottel (page 1 of 7)

“Indian Student Association Spotlight – A President’s Perspective” by Yamini Vyas

Throughout my elementary, middle, and even high school days, my father would always joke: “Yamini for President!” Of course his joke was fully laced with seriousness, but to my immensely shy and introverted self, the idea was seemingly impossible. Fast-forward through years of me working through my public speaking anxiety and sharpening my leadership skills to this year, where I have the privilege of serving as President for UD’s Indian Student Association (ISA). After enrolling in the Honors College, one of the first things I looked into during my freshman year was becoming a member of this organization. And sophomore year, as I aimed to be more involved, I  effectively became ISA’s Treasurer. 

ISA aims to facilitate understanding between students to cultivate meaningful, lasting relationships among community members of all different backgrounds. We promote social and cultural activities originating from all over India, ranging from Punjab to Tamil Nadu. And although it is referred to as the “Indian” Student Association, we house an all-inclusive environment where any student can be a member regardless of their cultural heritage. While this is not an exhaustive list of our events and celebrations, below are some of our most prominent and memorable ones that you won’t want to miss.   

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TBT: “Nine Little Days” by Audrey Ostroski

It’s Throwback Thursday here at 186 South College! With Thanksgiving Break just around the corner, we wanted to revisit this piece by Audrey Ostroski from 2017 about the anticipation leading up to well-deserved break from course commitments.

Thanksgiving break is almost here!  One might not think that this nine-day break is a big deal, but we look forward to those nine little days all semester.  Throughout syllabus week, while appraising the work to be done this semester and debating whether or not to drop a class, you can hear the people making the occasional joke, “Is it Thanksgiving break yet?”  So, what is it about those nine little days that we all anticipate?

For starters, after 12 weeks of unrelenting class after class, lab after lab, exam after exam, project after project – those nine little days are an oasis in the desert that is the fall semester. Honestly, the semester routine just starts to get old after a while. After the tenth, six-page physics lab report, you start to cringe every time you glance at the Excel icon on your desktop. After the third group project in two weeks, you start to hate the smell of the library study rooms. Even your dorm room might start to feel like it is closing in on you. And sure, there might only be two weeks after we come back from Thanksgiving before finals. Some might say that we should be able to push through without the break. But no, those nine little days are essential and you are not going to be able to convince me otherwise.  

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“Reflecting on New Beginnings” by Shayna Demick

After passing through the official halfway point of the fall semester and start of a new month, it is all too easy to reflect on my recent experiences, in all aspects of college life. 

There are many new beginnings happening in my life right now. I recently moved into my first apartment and adopted my own emotional support cat. Her name is Rugelach; she is two years old and extremely snuggly. I am living with two of my friends on the UD figure skating team and it is wonderful. We have decorated our common space together and have truly made our house into a home. I have been beginning to embrace adulthood, whether that means cooking and shopping for myself, cat parenting, deep cleaning, or paying bills. These new beginnings have been both scary and rewarding. 

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“My First Scientific Conference Experience!” by Lauren Mottel

Earlier this month, I was fortunate enough to attend my first scientific conference, the annual meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society, more easily referred to as BMES, in San Antonio, TX. There, I was able to present a poster on my undergraduate research project from the summer, as well as sit in on several panel discussions and presentations to get a sneak peek at unpublished research from universities across the country. Most importantly, however, I was able to network directly with other undergraduate students and PhD candidates alike about their work and experience living in different cities, and if I was fortunate enough, I was able to talk to faculty research advisors, or principal investigators (PIs). This was all possible due to not only the support of my lab and research mentors, but also with support from the Student Travel Award for Research Scholarship (STARS) program organized by Dr. Bansal, which fully funded the travel expenses for me and a handful of other UD BME seniors pursuing graduate school.  

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“A Non-Exhaustive List of Cool Places on Campus” by Nadya Ellerhorst

Sometimes it’s hard for me to wrap my head around the fact that I attended UD for an entire year – without actually attending UD. As such, much of my sophomore year was spent in a first-year sort of awe at all of the different parts of campus, and even in the present it seems like I make a new discovery every day. For example, I just had a class in the art conservation lab in Old College, where I quite literally sat right next to museum objects out of their cases – and I’m not even an Art Conservation major!

Even though there’s likely still plenty of UD treasures for me to unearth, I thought I’d give a summary of some of the coolest places I’ve come across thus far.

But what is it that makes these places cool? I can’t say I’m quite sure. I hang out in some, bask in awe at others, and have frankly visited a few a handful of times. But this list just scratches the surface – there’s still plenty for this Blue Hen to uncover – and I encourage you to seek out and compile a cool-place repertoire for yourself.

Daugherty Hall

One of my favorite places to study on campus, I’m letting you in on my little secret because it’s such a beautiful, comfortable, AND convenient place to get your work done. The tables are outfitted with both fancy lamps (they happen to be the kind that turn on when you pull the lil’ cord) and outlets to charge your devices, and there are plenty of comfy chairs and couches throughout. The stained glass is also stunning, and I always love the vibes there on rainy weekend nights.

The Bouncy Turf of North Campus

Right in front of Pencader Dining Hall is a delightful, mildly springy turf that I adore crossing whenever I go on a fresh smoothie and açai bowl run. Sometimes people are playing actual sports on it, so lest I get bonked on the head by a stray soccer ball, I must settle for the concrete walkways. But in order to get there you’ll need to cross…

The North Campus Bridge

Beware of the lantern flies, but look at that creek down below! I definitely recommend crossing sooner rather than later so you can savor the surrounding autumn ~foliage~ while it lasts.

Gore Hall

I’m always pleased whenever I see that I have a class or RSO meeting here, as the bright yellow walls and beautiful atrium never cease to amaze me. The bridge connecting it to Smith Hall is an added perk (and very convenient during times of traffic and heavy rain). 

Old College

Old College is just a beautiful building in and of itself (although beware of the slippery stairs!). There’s also an exhibit space in here (and lots of other places on campus). If you don’t feel like the star of some coming-of-age movie strolling through its tree-lined walkway on your way to class, then this blog post will have been for nothing.

The Hen Zone

From board games to Nintendo Switch, the Hen Zone in Perkins has plenty to do, which I find perfect for a little stress relief or a fun, post-homework-completion night with friends. There’s also plenty of places to sit and get work done if the sound of ping pong matches and intense air hockey games is your kind of ambiance.

The Basement of Perkins

The basement of Perkins is a relatively quiet space with a variety of seating, and it’s also fun to peek into the RSO offices down there. It’s likewise a great space if you’re in need of some secretive corner to munch on a doughnut.

[Nocturnal] Trabant

Trabant itself is a pretty cool building (it hosts International Coffee Hour every Friday from 4-6), but especially so after dark, when its vaulted ceiling is illuminated by the glow of yellow and blue neon lights. I even saw an impromptu a capella performance there one night as I picked up a meal exchange, but I was shy so I sort of jogged through.

The Cherry Blossoms

There’s a fair chance you’ve seen them on UD brochures and postcards alike, and with spring will come the blossoming of these delightfully pink trees. There’s really nothing like walking (and suddenly stopping to take photos) of the blossoms in the walkway between Memorial Hall and Lammot du Pont Laboratory. Patience. Your chance for spectacular selfies will soon come.

The Student Multimedia Design Center in Morris Library

No one will shush you down here. The basement of Morris is both an excellent study space, especially if you don’t mind a little background noise, and a superb campus resource for all things digital. There’s recording booths and a lot of other technology I won’t spend my word count pretending I understand. 

South Green

If you’re looking to take advantage of the pleasant weather while it lasts, the South Green is a tranquil, lovely place for a walk. After all, it’s so… GREEN!

The Train!

Seeing this choo choo that serves as the unofficial division point between Main and North Campus will be cool the first time, like witnessing something out of Hogwarts. Relish it because from then on it’ll probably just be a source of aggravation. Listen closely, and you can hear students’ collective running-late yell of frustration over the siren.

YoUDee’s Eyes

Ok, this isn’t necessarily a place, but have you ever noticed that there are mini State- of-Delawares in them? If you don’t believe me, stare really hard at them next time you see YoUDee at a university event (those are generally pretty cool places to be, anyway). If this observation just changed your life, you’re welcome.

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