Tag: community (page 1 of 15)

“Nostalgia” by Alaka Deshpande

“I wish there was a way to know you’re in the good old days before you’ve actually left them,” goes the quote by Andy Bernard from The Office, a quote that seems to resonate with everyone. Nostalgia is such a powerful feeling: we all reflect on and relive the happiest moments of our past in our minds. We evoke a warm, happy feeling with just a hint of sadness while we yearn to be back in that moment, knowing that it has passed.

Nostalgia is especially powerful under our current circumstances, when life looks much different than it used to before. It feels like our lives have been stripped away of so many things that they used to be full of: the busy and bustling long days on campus full of classes and club meetings, dining hall dinners, and late nights with friends. These have all been reduced down to long days alone in my room, taking Zoom classes from my bed.  Continue reading

“Becoming a Blue Hen: Honors and E-52” by Abigail McGraw

Entering college is never easy. A million obstacles are standing in your way, ready to knock you down and make you stumble. The anxiety of fitting in and excelling in your classes is omnipresent. The challenge of online school for my first semester in college only heightens the daunting nature of freshman year. So, welcome to “Becoming a Blue Hen”, where I’ll keep you updated with the highs and lows of this semester and every funny story in between. 

Spending the day setting up my desk in my childhood bedroom on August 31st was never the way I imagined the beginning of my freshman year in college. I felt a resounding sense of sadness as I thought about the isolation I was sure to feel this semester. With the Blue Hen family spread out across the globe, it has certainly been difficult to feel like a part of the UD community this semester. As an out-of-state freshman, I feel particularly out of place. While many of my friends from high school have established relationships at their in-state colleges, I entered this semester knowing exactly no one at UD. Because of this, I would be remiss if I didn’t try to find ways to be involved this semester. Through my Munson Fellow, Sean Wirt, and the UD 1743 Welcome Days events in August, I’ve been able to connect with a wide range of RSOs and start forming relationships with my peers in the Honors College before heading to campus (hopefully) in the spring! Continue reading

“UDaB and Me” by Erin Jackson

A huge number of people on this campus participate in service, and an impressively large group go on alternative break programs. It simply blows my mind how many people are not only willing – but unbelievably enthusiastic – to dedicate the one week they have off during an otherwise non-stop semester to go on one of these programs. Nothing about this process is easy—socially, financially, emotionally, physically, or mentally. When you sign up to spend a week of your life with near strangers somewhere you’ve never been before, meeting people or experiences you’ve never encountered before, you’re not just stepping out of your comfort zone—you’re leaping into a whole new realm of unknown that cannot compare to anything you’ve done before. I’m sure everyone knows someone who has done an alternative break and come back physically incapable of talking about anything else. However, since my program left the day after Christmas and came back just at the start of winter session, I missed my chance to go off about what an amazing program it was—and that’s actually not what I want to talk about here. I want to talk about the people who made this program what it was. Continue reading

“Connection” by Avery Beer

From the day we are born until the day we die, the power of human connection is a force stronger than anything. As we grow up, a lot of us forget that it is 100% okay to still need to feel that. Babies cry because they need to be touched, loved, nurtured and attended to. That never really goes away. Just as our basic needs of food, water, air, and shelter stay constant, so does our need for each other. Not only does our psychological survival depend on human connection, but our physical survival as well.

Feeling connected to another person can be so powerful, whether it is through friendship, love, or blood. Picture a yin-yang: we are all balancing each other out but have a little bit of ourselves in the other person. I believe that sometimes, we just meet people that understand our souls. It just works. We are wired to connect. Think about the complexity of interconnection amongst people who can simply be present for each other. Whether it is an outcome of a dyadic interaction or a larger group interaction, human connection is one of the purest forms of brilliance. If we erase the material belongings of life, we would be more than okay as long as we had each other. Somewhere as people get older, our ego gets in the way without us really knowing it, and we sometimes fall into accepting the idea that we can do it all alone. We want to do everything ourselves: we want to feel needed but not do the needing. Life really is not made for that. Life is made for connectedness. Continue reading

“Reunion Run” by Erin Jackson

I recently ran the Café Gelato 10 miler alongside an amazing assortment of individuals whom I couldn’t have imagined together in any other circumstance. To be honest, I was not in my best shape and I didn’t know anyone else running the race, but I figured if nothing else, it would be a wake up call to myself to start working out more. Anyway, I am not going to write about myself because that would be boring; I want to write about my state and my school and how lucky I am that they are in the same place.

I didn’t know anyone else running when I registered that morning. However, once I began making my way over to the start, the reunion began to unfold. People from all parts of my past were crossing my path. Some I said hi to, others I maybe only smiled as they walked by, not noticing me. Still others I didn’t acknowledge at all for I didn’t know how to. Friends from high school cross country, freshmen to seniors, showed up in various stages of in-shape-ness since the glory days of having scheduled time to run together every day. More familiar faces included parents of friends, old teachers dating back to middle school and beyond, and that person I did that one project with one time but don’t know if they’d recognize me so out of context. Continue reading

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