Tag: reflection (page 1 of 2)

“On Doing Things Alone” by Nadya Ellerhorst

As we approach the spring semester’s grand finale, with final RSO meetings and bouncy house-laden end-of-the-year events,  it’s really hard to feel alone, especially with everyone having the shared experiences of preparing for finals while trying to conclude things on a fun note.

I definitely consider myself the type of person who actively tries to make time to go to as many events on campus as possible throughout the year. Doing so is a great way to take a break from academics and to have memorable, enriching, potentially eye-opening experiences, be it at a theater performance or a guest lecture. I’d be lying if I said that I didn’t appreciate the occasional freebie, either. Sometimes, however, attending such events solo can prove to be a challenge. 

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“The Yellow House on the Corner” by Grace Kearns

Going home at the end of my first semester was bittersweet. As I filled up my suitcase, I packed away the people, places, and routines that had become a part of my daily life. It would be seven weeks until I returned to them. Once I completed my last final, though, I beamed at the sight of my mom’s car pulled up to the lightly-frosted Green. Suddenly, all I could think of was curling up in my childhood bedroom, the endless holiday baking about to ensue, and a houseful of siblings coming from three different states. I was ready to go home. Continue reading

“On Connections & Croissants” by Lauren Mottel

The morning sun greets you from its climb in the sky as you exit the train station, backlit by clear blue skies and seagulls circling overhead. You don’t even have to think as the click of your boots on the pavement guide you across the street to a small storefront with an orange awning. As you cross the threshold, an 8-bit rendition of “Für Elise” announces your presence to the display case of croissants, torsades aux pommes, chocolate muffins, and other treasured pastries. And there, before you and your friends can take a half-step further into the bakery, the owner excitedly walks out from the back kitchen exclaiming, Les filles! Bonjour, les filles! and ushering the cashier away so she can select our pastries for us with a grin. 

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“The Glow in Your Eyes” by Yusra Farooqui

My sight lost itself inside the pool of honey brown 

Which glowed like gold in the sun

And gazed glossily across the distant world with a frown

Carrying a heavy heart that was overrun

 

I saw the nothingness, the empty daze of running thoughts  

Of a mind so busy, a heart so lost

My own soul ached to fill those barren spots

No matter what the cost

 

I reached out with a comforting hand to hold

Those dry tears that fell

Of a stubborn mind that only acted so bold

And chose to trudge through hell 

 

My sight lost itself inside a warming smile that acted

As a fleeting curtain to hide 

The broken spirit that felt painfully compacted 

And needed an embrace in which to reside

 

My eyes found themselves far within an ocean so dark;

Bronze glow clouded from murky thoughts

Oh how I hoped to bring back that igniting spark

And remove that fazed gloss

 

So they would always look like sweet cinnamon bark

 

So my sight would find itself inside a pool of honey brown 

Which would glow like gold in the sunlight

While gazing joyfully into my own without a frown

Making the eased heart a pure sight

Beaming brightly, shining as my radiating sun 

 

This is a poem composed by  Yusra Farooqui, a student in the Honors College describing the experience of “looking deeper into a human being.” In celebration of National Poetry Month, “186 South College” will be posting the work of Honors students weekly throughout the month of April as bonus content. If you or someone you know would like to share their work as a guest writer like Yusra, we are still accepting submissions at this link: https://bit.ly/186Poets22

“To Overthink or To Oversimplify” by Yamini Vyas

Whether I like to admit it or not, I am very much the type of person to overthink. As an Honors business student with many responsibilities, I tend to rely heavily on set schedules, definitive answers, and clear outcomes. And if anything begins to come undone, my composure seems to slowly unravel as well. A plethora of what-ifs overshadows the detailed plans that were once finalized in my mind. Everything could go wrong, right? 

Whether he likes to admit it or not, one of my closest friends is very much the type of person to oversimplify. As an Honors pre-med student with many responsibilities, he tends to go with the flow. And if anything begins to come undone, his composure stays fixed, slowly accepting what comes his way as is. Why worry when everything could still go right? 

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