Tag: student (page 1 of 2)

“Crippling Ambition” by Shayna Demick

gripping your throat, your joints, tissue, your fingers and toes, submerged in your blood stream, strangling your woes, 

ambition has taken command of your being. 

ambition drives some to make strides, defy the odds and establish themselves. 

but for me, my ambition suffocates me and collapses on top of me before I even vacate my starting position. 

I have crippling ambition.

I want everything I can’t have. 

I feel it so strongly that it makes me weak.

I’m feeble and fearful. 

failure taunts me everywhere I look. 

I want my dreams too badly that I am paralyzed by my ambition.  Continue reading

“Speak to Me” by Andrew Smith

Warm are the words
you spoke to me then.
Now I fear them in longing
of everlasting concavity
that I should hear them again.
Sweet honey oozes in somber timbre,
they flow through me and rush!
like a river fills every crack in the stone.

Majestic and nay, angelic, that God
graces the land with an image of He
but rather a voice of disastrous beauty
entranced even now by
mere temptatious thought.
In dreams I await to hear echoes and
reverberations an ounce remaining
still potent in my existential awestruck.

 

This is a romantic poem composed by  Andrew Smith, a Class of 2024 student in the Honors College. In celebration of National Poetry Month, “186 South College” will be posting the work of Honors students weekly throughout the month of April and May as bonus content. If you or someone you know would like to share their work as a guest writer like Andrew, we are still accepting submissions at this link: https://bit.ly/186Poets22

“‘Working for the Knife’: Mitski and Academics” by Chris Hope

Indie singer-songwriter Mitski’s popularity has skyrocketed since 2020, which is somewhat of an anomaly for an artist whose most recent album was released in mid-2018 and whose last performance prior to that had been announced to be her last performance ever. Her 2018 single “Nobody” achieved popularity online, but until 2020, her popularity remained more insular. This can be attributed to many things, whether it be her excellent songwriting, her often melancholy lyrics speaking to people living through quarantine, or, funnily enough, TikTok trends. Continue reading

“Aca-knowledging Little Victories” by Grace Kearns

If you found yourself on the second floor of Trabant Student Center on any Tuesday evening, you would think you had just wandered onto Barden University’s campus by mistake. In the cinematic masterpiece that is Pitch Perfect (2012), Barden University is home to four collegiate a Cappella groups. UD just so happens to one-up Barden with eight groups on our very own campus. 

As a first-year member of the MelUDees, I have yet to be in a Riff-Off or perform for the Obamas, and I (thankfully) have been spared from singing any horrendous mashups of “I Saw the Sign” and “Bulletproof.” However, to answer the question that all of my hometown friends and family first asked when I joined in September: yes, it is a lot like Pitch Perfect. I have lived some of the most iconic scenes in the movie, from the involvement fair, to performing gigs around campus, and even hanging out with the other a Cappella groups. My most movie-like moment so far, though, was competing in the International Championship for Collegiate a Cappella (ICCAs) last month.  Continue reading

“College: A Work in Progress and a Work of Art” by Grace Kearns

My earliest memory of campus takes me back to my little, four-year old pigtails, tied up with blue and golden bows. As I sat on my dad’s shoulders, he pointed out the very sports field that he used to play football on each week. For weeks after, I ran through the house, humming the “Fight Song”. With two proud Blue Hen alumni as parents, I felt as if I had heard all there was to know about the University of Delaware. During my first official tour, I couldn’t help but make connections. Old College was not just the postcard campus building, it was where my parents first met. Russell was not just a dining hall, it was where my parents would sneak in a quick lunch together between classes. And Main Street was not just a little stretch of shops and restaurants, it was where my parents went on their very first dates. That being said, I adjusted to life at UD pretty fast. It felt familiar. Honestly, this worried me. I worried that I could outgrow it too fast. Continue reading

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