Category: Yamini Vyas (page 1 of 2)

“Indian Student Association Spotlight – A President’s Perspective” by Yamini Vyas

Throughout my elementary, middle, and even high school days, my father would always joke: “Yamini for President!” Of course his joke was fully laced with seriousness, but to my immensely shy and introverted self, the idea was seemingly impossible. Fast-forward through years of me working through my public speaking anxiety and sharpening my leadership skills to this year, where I have the privilege of serving as President for UD’s Indian Student Association (ISA). After enrolling in the Honors College, one of the first things I looked into during my freshman year was becoming a member of this organization. And sophomore year, as I aimed to be more involved, I  effectively became ISA’s Treasurer. 

ISA aims to facilitate understanding between students to cultivate meaningful, lasting relationships among community members of all different backgrounds. We promote social and cultural activities originating from all over India, ranging from Punjab to Tamil Nadu. And although it is referred to as the “Indian” Student Association, we house an all-inclusive environment where any student can be a member regardless of their cultural heritage. While this is not an exhaustive list of our events and celebrations, below are some of our most prominent and memorable ones that you won’t want to miss.   

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“To Overthink or To Oversimplify” by Yamini Vyas

Whether I like to admit it or not, I am very much the type of person to overthink. As an Honors business student with many responsibilities, I tend to rely heavily on set schedules, definitive answers, and clear outcomes. And if anything begins to come undone, my composure seems to slowly unravel as well. A plethora of what-ifs overshadows the detailed plans that were once finalized in my mind. Everything could go wrong, right? 

Whether he likes to admit it or not, one of my closest friends is very much the type of person to oversimplify. As an Honors pre-med student with many responsibilities, he tends to go with the flow. And if anything begins to come undone, his composure stays fixed, slowly accepting what comes his way as is. Why worry when everything could still go right? 

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“Minimize Stress Through Maximum Organization” by Yamini Vyas

After coming back from a long winter break, it can be difficult to settle back into your college life for the spring semester. You might be working to understand the structure of your courses, ranging from note-taking techniques to exam schedules. Or shifting your job schedule to work around weekly class times. Or trying to at least somewhat normalize your sleep habits. Or maybe, you’re struggling with all of the above. 

This semester, along with a rigorous course load, I will be returning to my positions as a Peer Consultant at the Career Center, Treasurer for the Indian Student Association, and Secretary for Active Minds. In addition to those leadership roles, I continue to be an active member of Women in Business, the Accounting Students Association, and of course, the ever-engaging Honors blog. I’m sure that many of you, if not all, can relate to the endless accumulation of things to do that constantly flows through these types of schedules. For me, each semester starts off frantically as I try to figure out how to efficiently manage all of my different roles and responsibilities. And for me, the key is organization. 

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“Beyond the Comedy – Life Lessons from ‘Friends'” by Yamini Vyas

236 episodes. 10 seasons. One of the most popular television shows of all time. Friends revolves around the intertwined lives of six friends who navigate their 20s and 30s in New York City. Categorized as an American sitcom, the series definitely lives up to its name. Each episode is created with the perfect amount of comedic timing, sarcastic remarks, and playful banter. But behind that comedy lies a plethora of teachings to take away and implement into our own lives. As a bigger-than-huge fan of Friends myself (I’ve watched the entire show more than three times), these are the five main lessons I have recognized and continuously try to implement in my own life: 

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“Major Changes to Your Major” by Yamini Vyas

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” Always a simple question, but never really a simple answer. 

In elementary school, I remember wanting to be a teacher. In middle school, I remember wanting to be a lawyer. And in high school, I shifted from both of those tracks because I wanted to go down a business path. 

During each phase of my life, I had a clear answer for the notorious question. I never felt particularly confused about my career plans. And still, my answer kept evolving as I grew, matured, and continued to learn new things about myself. Some of us know what we want to do with our lives from the very beginning. Others are still working to figure it out. There’s no “right” answer, and there’s no “right” time because the process of finding an aspiration varies from person to person. 

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