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Tag: advice (page 1 of 12)

“Major Decisions” by Nicole Pinera

It is hard to believe that the end of the spring semester came so quickly. My first year as a college student is  complete; in comparison to how long it felt like I waited to get here as a high school student, desperate to break out into the “real world,” it’s gone by all too fast. With the end of the semester came the (somewhat tedious) process of planning for the next fall semester. I took the opportunity to reflect on my current major and solidify some big decisions.

At some point during the fall semester, after scouring the course catalog a few times and reflecting on my current classes, I decided that I wanted to switch out of Exercise Science. Based on my interests, the logical decision seemed to be Biological Sciences. But all of this raised an obvious question: when do I make the switch? I found myself in an academic advisor’s office around midterms during the fall semester, asking all of these questions and unsuccessfully trying to figure out four years in one meeting. Her advice to me? “Go back to your dorm and worry about your midterms for now.” It wasn’t the right time to start questioning all of my life decisions, and the courses that I was taking had me on the right track for Exercise Science or Biology. There was no rush to make that decision at the time, and I’m glad that I took the time to consider my options. Continue reading

“My Experience Changing Majors at UD” by Ryan Dean

Choosing a major is one of the most important decisions in one’s college career. Unfortunately, it’s also one of the first choices students are pressured to make. And the ramifications for selecting a pathway inappropriate for you vary wildly, from adding on a semester to catch up on classes, to going back to school years later. Therefore it’s critical that you decide on a major that both satisfies your interests and secures your economic future. In my case, I simply lacked the experience to say for certain exactly what I was interested in. My parents were willing to support me in whatever career path I chose, which was very kind but ultimately placed greater responsibility on me to enroll in a program that was compelling and feasible. I ended up selecting a major that aligned with where I believed my skills lay, namely, English—with the caveat that I would return to the matter after my first year at UD.

Over the course of two semesters, I managed to explore a variety of topics within and beyond my selected field of study. I took classes in subjects that had always interested me but were not offered in my previous schooling, all the while fulfilling a collection of breadth requirements I would need to complete regardless. By the conclusion of this investigative period, I had finally landed upon an avenue of study that I had always trended towards, but never thought to pursue: Computer Science. However, the idea of altering such a fundamental aspect of my college education appeared quite daunting. I feared that I might go about this process incorrectly as a consequence of my own ignorance, hindering my ability to take required courses or even delaying my graduation date. I wasted valuable time mulling over my decision and attempting to research the necessary steps. Continue reading

“Top Four Tips for Finding a Job After College” by Avery Beer

“What are you doing after graduation?”

This question seems to be asked at least once a day, and I am sure to all my fellow graduating class members, you know exactly what I mean. These last few years have given me so much here at Delaware; but what I can tell you is that there are just some things that you cannot learn in a classroom. Yes, you guessed it. I’m talking about the complex, competitive, seemingly never-ending job search. I have had quite a few internships, and I am currently in the job search process now. It is not easy by any means, but having experience with the internship search has taught me a bit about what it takes. I have become a sort of “connoisseur” in this area, so I have decided to compile a list for all of you Blue Hens reading this who may also be looking for a job. Once your résumé is polished, check out these top four tips for landing a job post-graduation.

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“Connection” by Avery Beer

From the day we are born until the day we die, the power of human connection is a force stronger than anything. As we grow up, a lot of us forget that it is 100% okay to still need to feel that. Babies cry because they need to be touched, loved, nurtured and attended to. That never really goes away. Just as our basic needs of food, water, air, and shelter stay constant, so does our need for each other. Not only does our psychological survival depend on human connection, but our physical survival as well.

Feeling connected to another person can be so powerful, whether it is through friendship, love, or blood. Picture a yin-yang: we are all balancing each other out but have a little bit of ourselves in the other person. I believe that sometimes, we just meet people that understand our souls. It just works. We are wired to connect. Think about the complexity of interconnection amongst people who can simply be present for each other. Whether it is an outcome of a dyadic interaction or a larger group interaction, human connection is one of the purest forms of brilliance. If we erase the material belongings of life, we would be more than okay as long as we had each other. Somewhere as people get older, our ego gets in the way without us really knowing it, and we sometimes fall into accepting the idea that we can do it all alone. We want to do everything ourselves: we want to feel needed but not do the needing. Life really is not made for that. Life is made for connectedness. Continue reading

“Presentation Tips” by Ryan Dean

In most college courses, classes consist of lectures, note-taking, and group assignments. But every so often students are required to demonstrate their knowledge publicly, in the form of an oral presentation. These occur so infrequently that many are unfamiliar with the strategies necessary to put on an engaging and informational presentation, or are out of practice with the behaviors of a skilled presenter. Fortunately, my high school afforded me plenty of opportunities to sharpen my proficiency in this vocation, and in this blog post I would like to share some of the techniques I have learned both through experience and mentorship.

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