186 South College

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Tag: advice (page 1 of 11)

“Connection” by Avery Beer

From the day we are born until the day we die, the power of human connection is a force stronger than anything. As we grow up, a lot of us forget that it is 100% okay to still need to feel that. Babies cry because they need to be touched, loved, nurtured and attended to. That never really goes away. Just as our basic needs of food, water, air, and shelter stay constant, so does our need for each other. Not only does our psychological survival depend on human connection, but our physical survival as well.

Feeling connected to another person can be so powerful, whether it is through friendship, love, or blood. Picture a yin-yang: we are all balancing each other out but have a little bit of ourselves in the other person. I believe that sometimes, we just meet people that understand our souls. It just works. We are wired to connect. Think about the complexity of interconnection amongst people who can simply be present for each other. Whether it is an outcome of a dyadic interaction or a larger group interaction, human connection is one of the purest forms of brilliance. If we erase the material belongings of life, we would be more than okay as long as we had each other. Somewhere as people get older, our ego gets in the way without us really knowing it, and we sometimes fall into accepting the idea that we can do it all alone. We want to do everything ourselves: we want to feel needed but not do the needing. Life really is not made for that. Life is made for connectedness. Continue reading

“Presentation Tips” by Ryan Dean

In most college courses, classes consist of lectures, note-taking, and group assignments. But every so often students are required to demonstrate their knowledge publicly, in the form of an oral presentation. These occur so infrequently that many are unfamiliar with the strategies necessary to put on an engaging and informational presentation, or are out of practice with the behaviors of a skilled presenter. Fortunately, my high school afforded me plenty of opportunities to sharpen my proficiency in this vocation, and in this blog post I would like to share some of the techniques I have learned both through experience and mentorship.

Continue reading

“Start Moving This Semester!” by Jenny Gloyd

For me, this semester is strikingly similar to the last. I am excited to continue living in Redding, to travel up to the same beautiful corner of campus every week to sing in my choir, and to dive back into some general chemistry—I strangely missed the challenge of it! Despite the comparability between my two semesters at the University of Delaware, there has still been an adjustment period this time around. This is the time to ask myself, “Do I want to approach this semester the same way as the last?” My personal answer to this question is that surrendering to the same routine would be outright boring. Among tweaked study habits, new involvement in clubs, and other little improvements, the best decision I have made this semester is to START MOVING!

I have decided to stay active this semester. I was on the cross country team all four years of high school and loved it, so why not start running here at UD? As of now, almost every day of the week I lace up my sneakers and head out on a running trail—my favorite so far has been running on the trails on North Campus. Continue reading

“Artes Vita: Touching Up Your Work Flow” By Abhigna Rao

HI EVERYONE! WELCOME BACK! I hope everyone had a lovely, restful Winter Break, whether you were taking a Winter Session, chilling at home, away on vacation, or studying abroad!

But now it’s back to the grind, and I can’t be the only one who’s feeling a tad bit overwhelmed with the impending hustle of the next twelve weeks. It’s only been three weeks into the spring semester, and I already feel like the rustic bricks of Old College are being thrown at me.

Nevertheless, how we handle the pressure of achieving a healthy work-life balance is fully within our control—if we develop the right mindset to do so. One of my objectives for personal growth this semester is to really work hard to stay on top of my academics and activities, and I want to share with you some of the strategies I have been using in order to do just that. Continue reading

“Think Like a Tomato: A Guide to the Pomodoro Method” by Nicole Pinera

We thrive on the ping of new notifications, two paragraph long summaries of three-hundred page novels, and fifteen second video clips… and it is killing our productivity. When it’s time to sit down and study or write that final essay that’s been hanging over your head all semester, it can be hard not to start mindlessly scrolling through your phone. I’ve found a technique that helps me focus and get work done. Especially as UD Honors students, who typically have too many commitments and just not enough hours in the day for every one of them, being productive and focusing on the task at hand is a lifesaver.

For anyone who knows a little bit of Italian (disclaimer: I don’t, I used Google Translate), you’ll know that “pomodoro” translates to “tomato.” If you don’t get how a tomato can help you do your homework, don’t worry; there’s a fun backstory to this simple but effective productivity method. A college student named Francesco Cirillo used a tomato-shaped kitchen timer to break his work up into 25 minute blocks, followed by a short break. The concept, originally devised in the 1980s, stuck, and this widely popularized technique is known as the Pomodoro Method today. Continue reading

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