Tag: honors (page 1 of 10)

“Your Life is Your Choice” by Shrinidhi Dandibhotla

There comes a point in everyone’s life when they question why they started what they did in the first place. Why did I choose to do this? What was I thinking?

As a first-year Honors student, I know how stressful and intimidating it can be to start this new chapter of your life during a global pandemic. While the world is fighting to keep people alive, you are fighting your own battles with virtual education and extracurriculars. And trust me, I know it’s not easy no matter what anyone else tells you. 

Honors students tend to be high achievers, setting high, possibly even unrealistic, goals for themselves. And while staying so focused on getting to the finish line, it’s easy to forget where the race even began. They begin to blindly run towards an unclear destination. And I don’t want to sit here and tell you that the journey to achieve your goals is easy and to just stay focused on your target, because if I did, I would be lying. The path of life is far from easy–but it’s not impossible.  Continue reading

“Winter Recollections and Springing Forward” by Abigail McGraw

Picture this: you’re sitting in your ENGL 110 class listening to Mr. Peters explain Flat Earth conspiracy theories when your eyes catch sight of a white speck through the window. And then you realize–SNOW!! IT SNOWS IN DELAWARE!!

This may seem a bit dramatic, but I have seen more snow in the first two weeks on campus than I’ve seen in the last two years in Virginia Beach. I’ve always loved the snow and have always been deprived of it. Hallmark movies have been taunting me with the thought of snow on Christmas while it was warm enough to go swimming at the beach during the holidays. I love everything about snow; the way it falls so softly and makes the world go quiet; the way it reflects the streetlights and makes the cloudy skies glow with warm orange light; and most of all, I love the sound it makes when it crunches under my feet. Continue reading

“Learning How to Say No” by Rachel Gray

These are unprecedented times with loads of uncertainty, whether that be with grades, work, relationships, or home life. Everything has been up in the air. If you’re like me, you’ve been feeling “bleh” a lot recently, mostly from our situations right now. Like many others, online schooling has taken a toll on my mental health, so finding the positives in this trying time has been super important. At this current point in the semester, staying motivated might seem super difficult, but it’s not impossible. Continue reading

“A Trip to UDairy Creamery” by Jenny Gloyd

The University of Delaware is a lively place. The qualities of the school and the community around it make it somewhere you want to be. I see people walking on campus, smiling and chatting with friends, and families who pass by Morris Library, The Green, and Main Street, appreciating campus even though access is restricted for the time being. Amidst the chaos of an online semester, there is still a beating heart on campus.  Continue reading

“Transitioning to a Spring Semester Mindset” by Abigail McGraw

Winter break was a time of relaxation and relief from a tough fall semester. While we couldn’t travel and see family for the holidays, my family and I still made the most of our time off. I continued to work with the First-Year Fellows, and we organized some amazing programs over the winter to stay engaged with the Honors community while on break. I also participated in the E-52 virtual production of Check Please! directed by Heidi Fliegelman and Christine Marchesano. 

But if you’re anything like me, you probably spent most of the winter break sleeping in, playing with pets, and living a mostly unstructured life. I didn’t take any winter courses, which left me no choice but to play Animal Crossing and nap on the couch with my dog. Suffice to say, I haven’t exactly been disciplined in keeping a routine as of late, which was slightly problematic as the Spring semester rapidly approached. Continue reading

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