Category Archives: healthy living

4th H for Health

May Edition

Strawberry Ladybugs

Ingredients:

Strawberries

Blueberries

Dark chocolate chips

Plastic zipper bag

 

Instructions:

  1. Remove the tops of the strawberries by cutting a small V-shape (this will leave a little pocket to attach their “heads”).
  2. Cut strawberries in half lengthwise.
  3. Melt chocolate in a microwave safe bowl and scoop into the bag. Cut the corner of the bag.
  4. Squeeze small dots of chocolate onto the strawberries.
  5. Use chocolate to attach the blueberry “head.” Allow chocolate to harden.
  6. Use chocolate to draw legs and antennae on the serving plate.

Penny Walk –

Take a “Penny Walk” with your family over the next month! Get outside and take a “penny walk” to see everything that is springing to life! “Penny Walks” help youth explore new surroundings and get physical exercise at the same time.

Supplies –

  • Penny
  • Paper and pen for scavenger hunt list

 

Activity Steps –

  • Step outside and walk until you reach an intersection in your path.
  • Flip your penny. If it lands on heads, then turn right and continue walking. If it lands on tails, turn left.
  • To make the penny walk more challenging, create a scavenger hunt list with objects you might find outside. Look for these items while you’re on your penny walk!

Healthy Habits Opportunities

Calling all Healthy Habits program participants for our first

Get Experience in Mindfulness Family Day

@ Lums Pond State Park!

Saturday May 14th 10:00am-2:00pm

Join us for mindfulness activities for the family including; all levels family friendly yoga, a self-guided mindful walk through the state park, immersive activities and crafts and a chance to win a 2022 Annual State Park Pass good through November 2022!

Register HERE


Mental Health Awareness Month Family Wellness Challenge!

May is Mental Health Awareness Month! We know mental health is strongly linked with overall health. For the month of May consider joining our May Family Wellness Challenge to boost your family’s overall health

Register HERE


For 4-H Teens

Teens as Teachers: Get Experience in Mindfulness Training goes Hybrid!

Are you a teen between 13-18 with an interest in mindfulness, health, and wellness?

Register HERE to become trained in our GEM-Get Experience in Mindfulness curriculum

Summer Nutrition Teens As Teachers Training!

Saturday June 11th 11:00am-3:00pm at NCC Cooperative Extension, 461 Wyoming Rd Newark, DE 19716

Register HERE

4th H for Health- April Edition

Bunny Faces

 

Mini circle cheeses

Celery – cut into “whiskers”

Baby carrots – cut in half for ears

A large carrot – cut into a triangle for nose

Mini chocolate chips – for eyes

 

Assemble the bunny faces by pushing the baby carrots into the top of the cheese for ears. Place the rest of the pieces on to make a bunny face.


Earth Day Adventures:

Have you heard about Plogging? Want to help the environment while improving your physical wellness? Join Delaware 4-H in plogging, an activity that combines jogging and picking up litter. Gather with your family, friends and 4-H clubs and pick up litter while jogging/walking in your local neighborhoods and parks. This initiative raises awareness by improving environmental, physical, emotional, and social wellness for all. Please sign up for our Plogging for the Planet initiative to celebrate Earth Day during the week of 4/18-4/23/22.

 

Coming up: Plogging for Earth Day, April 18th-23rd. Register here.

https://forms.gle/wLfWnMEgmMB8mJap9

 

Watch Delaware 4-H’s Plogging Vlog (video) here. https://youtu.be/HnFPjmD-QRU

Attached is information about Recycling as well as Safe Plogging tips. Safety tips will be emailed to participants who sign up so don’t be concerned it is a PDF.

Walk Across Delaware

Join us in this pilot program for Walk across Delaware April 4th – May 27th!
Get out there and walk! You will track your miles walked during the week and submit on Sundays.
We will be “walking”  (virtually) from Delmar, DE to the UD Main Campus in Newark, DE which is approximately 96 miles.
We will be taking a small group of participants as we are piloting this program.
If you have any questions or concerns, please reach out to Ms. Kaitlin or Mrs. Lindsay.

Register HERE today!

4th H for Health- March Edition

Leprechaun Hats

 

Ingredients:

Cucumbers

Yellow Bell pepper

White Cheese (I used Provolone)

Honey (or agave syrup)

                                   Small square cutter

      A knife

 

Directions:

  1. Take your cucumber and cut one-inch cylinders (approximately). One cylinder will make two hats.

 

  1. Stand your cucumber cylinders straight up and cut down the middle. Lay them flat, cut side down. Those will be the tops of your Leprechaun hats.

 

  1. With the rest of your cucumber cut some cucumber sticks, slightly larger than your cylinders. Those will be the lip of your hats. (cut a cucumber cylinder larger than your top hat cylinders. Cut those in half, and then cut to make cucumber sticks).

 

  1. With your small square cutter cut a few squares out of yellow bell pepper.

 

  1. With a knife cut some strips of cheese. I just eyeballed it–there really is no need to be precise. If it is too long you can always cut it shorter 🙂

 

  1. Assemble the hats: You need half a cucumber cylinder, one cucumber stick, one yellow bell pepper square and one piece of cheese. You can use a little bit of honey or agave nectar to “glue” down the cheese and bell pepper, if desired. I used a toothpick and dabbed some honey where the cheese was going to be place.

 

Become a Health & Wellness Ambassador!

Are you interested in health, wellness, and helping the community? 
Have you thought about becoming a Health & Wellness Ambassador?
Join us for our next Zoom session April 28th 2022 6:00pm-7:00pm and learn more about how to get involved as an ambassador! 
What are Health & Wellness Ambassadors?
Delaware 4-H Health & Wellness Ambassadors are official representatives and promoters of holistic healthy living, including fitness, nutrition, mindfulness and substance use prevention.
Ultimate Goals of Health & Wellness Ambassadors:
Learn about and promote healthy lifestyle choices
Create media about healthy living
Community outreach & education
Asset building, education, and promotion
Create and facilitate community change
Who should join?
 Teens ages 13-18 interested in cultivating skills of health, wellness, and leading a healthy lifestyle! If you are looking for a way to gain professional or volunteer experience in health and wellness, this is for you!
What does becoming a Health and Wellness Ambassador Entail?
Through registration you will be able to attend our Delaware 4-H Health and Wellness Ambassador monthly meetings with other individuals who share a passion for health and wellness and receive information on opportunities to get involved with promoting health and wellness in the Delaware community. Each month we will focus on areas of health and wellness such as; nutrition, mindfulness, fitness, prevention, and more! We will do this through virtual wellness workshops, hearing from guest speakers and engaging in curriculum training opportunities!
Questions about joining? Contact Alyssa Whittaker
Join us for our next Zoom session by registering below.
Details/Zoom Link will be sent to you upon registration a week prior to the January meeting.

Register HERE


Call for Questions!
Do you have a question about eating disorders OR addiction? Submit your questions anonymously using the  link HERE!

Healthy Fruits and Vegetables We Should All Eat- Spring Edition

The Delaware 4-H Program joins in partnership with GOLO, the pioneering wellness solutions company, to promote and provide important information on vegetables and fruits we should all eat to be healthier. We appreciate the monetary support of GOLO to our 4-H program around the initiative of Healthy Living, and their interest in the health and well-being of our 4-H youth. This is the second issue of this information we will be sharing with all our audiences. 

Please take time to review this information and include more vegetables and fruits in your normal daily diets. Look for additional information we will be sharing on a quarterly basis about other vegetables and fruits to eat.

 

Apricots

• Apricots are available fresh, canned, and dried
• Rich in vitamin E and vitamin C to protect skin cells
• Good source of potassium that improves nerve and muscle function
• Apricots have flavonoids which help to protect and strengthen your blood vessels while reducing inflammation
• Apricots contain a high-water content; one cup offers 2/3 of a cup of water
• Flavors range from sweet to sweet-tart, depending on the variety
• Originated in China, where it was first cultivated about 4,000 years ago
• Turkey and Iran are the world’s largest producer of apricots today
• There are 11 different varieties including Blenheim, Tilton, and Moorpark

https://www.webmd.com/diet/health-benefits-apricots


Asparagus

• Asparagus is a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin A, C, E, and K
• Rich in antioxidants that helps to reduce inflammation
• Helps give the brain a booster to prevent cognitive impairment
• Asparagus is a detoxifying compound that helps break down harmful compounds which helps fight cancer
• Available fresh, frozen, or canned
• Asparagus is a tasty, versatile vegetable that can be cooked in various ways or enjoyed raw in salads
• Contains high levels of asparagine, which serves as a natural diuretic and helps the body reduce excess salts
• There are three types of asparagus: green, white, and purple
• White asparagus are more delicate and difficult to harvest, and purple asparagus are smaller and fruitier in flavor

https://www.eatingwell.com/article/17129/5-powerful-health-benefits-of-asparagus-you-probably-didnt-know/

Banana

• Good source of potassium that helps lower blood pressure
• High in Vitamin B6 and C which may reduce the risk of cancer and diabetes
• Bananas contain several healthy antioxidants, responsible for reduced risk of heart disease
• Native to Southeast Asia and grown in many warmer areas of the world
• Many types and sizes exist, colors ranging from green to yellow and even some red
• Available fresh, frozen, and dried
• During ripening, starch is converted into sugars and reaches more than 16% of the fresh weight
• It is considered one of the most consumed fruits
• Other banana varieties include plantains and red bananas
• About 50 billion tones of Cavendish bananas are produced globally each year
• There are more than 1,000 varieties of bananas grown, but Cavendish is the most commercialized

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/bananas


Leeks

• High in Vitamin K which help with strong bones and reduce the risk of osteoporosis
• Contain carotenoids, substances that protect the eyes
• Rich in antioxidants that help reduce inflammation
• Leeks can be sliced in a salad, added to a roasted dish or soup, or used as a topping to finish a dish
• Farmers grow leeks in trenches to help keep the bulb white
• Leeks can be enjoyed cooked or raw
• The water and fiber in leeks can provide a feeling of fullness that can reduce overeating
• Like onions, leeks are root vegetables that have a mild, sweet flavor
• Greek philosopher Aristotle used a leek diet to create a clear strong voice
https://www.webmd.com/diet/health-benefits-leeks


Lemon

• Great source of Vitamin C and B6 that help with immune function, skin health, and metabolism
• Eating lemons may lower your risk of heart disease, cancer, and kidney stones
• High in potassium which helps to lower blood pressure and maintains positive heart health
• Plant compounds in lemons may have beneficial effects on cancer, cardiovascular disease, and inflammation
• Pectin is the main fiber in lemons which helps to lower blood sugar levels
• Lemons are native to Asia. They grow on lemon trees and are a hybrid of the original citron and lime
• Due to the sour taste, lemons are typically a garnish or juiced
• The high acidity of lemons makes them good cleaning aids
• Lemon trees can produce up to 600 pounds of lemons every year
• California and Arizona produce most of the United States’ lemon crop
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/6-lemon-health-benefits#TOC_TITLE_HDR_2


Mango

• Rich in Vitamin C which aids the immune system, helps the body absorb iron and promotes cell growth
• Contains Vitamin A to help maintain a healthy body
• They offer magnesium and potassium which helps maintain a healthy blood flow
• Mango has digestive enzymes, water, and dietary fiber that aid various aspects of digestive health
• Have powerful plant compounds that act as antioxidants to protect the body
• Originating in India around 5,000 years ago, mangos are one of the most widely consumed fruits in the world
• Available fresh, frozen, canned, and dried
• Mango is often referred to as the “king of fruits”
• Enjoy mango in smoothies, salsa, salads, on top of a burger or seafood dish
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/mango#8.-May-support-eye-health


Watercress

• Watercress are high in phytochemicals, which reduce the risk of developing certain types of cancer
• Rich in vitamin K which is necessary for blood clotting and healthy bones
• High in antioxidants that help to lower the risk of several chronic illnesses such as diabetes, cancer, and heart disease
• High in vitamin C that boost the immune system
• Contains carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin which are essential for eye health
• Ranked number one on the US Centers for Disease Control’s Powerhouse vegetables list
• Watercress are small, round leaves, and edible stems that have a peppery, slightly spicy flavor
• First cultivated in the UK in the early 1800s
• Watercress best eaten raw or lightly steamed and used in a wide variety of dishes

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/watercress-benefits#TOC_TITLE_HDR_11


Pineapple

• Pineapples are rich in vitamin C which is essential for growth and development and a healthy immune system
• High in manganese that maintains a healthy metabolism
• Loaded with antioxidants that may reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and certain cancers
• Pineapples contain digestive enzymes that break down proteins and aid in digestion
• Contain bromelain which has anti-inflammatory properties that provide pain relief for arthritis
• Eating pineapples may reduce the time it takes to recover from surgery or exercise
• Originated in South America, where early European explorers named it after its resemblance to a pinecone
• Pineapples are a sweet, convenient, and easy to incorporate into your diet
• Available fresh, canned, or frozen
• Enjoyed in smoothies, salads, or on homemade pizzas
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/benefits-of-pineapple


Onion

• Rich in Vitamin C and B6 that supports immune function and maintenance of skin and hair
• High in plant compounds and antioxidants which reduce inflammation
• Onions have good source of fiber which helps the digestive tract
• Eating vegetables of the Allium genus have been linked to a lower risk of certain cancers
• Commonly used as a flavoring or side dish
• Can be baked, boiled, grilled, fried, roasted, sauteed, powdered, or eaten raw
• Vary in size, shape, and color but most common types are white, yellow, and red
• Onions can easily be added to savory dishes, including eggs, guacamole, meat dishes, soups, and baked goods
• There are less than 1,000 onion farmers in the United States

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/onion-benefits#TOC_TITLE_HDR_11


Peas

• Peas are rich in vitamin K, C, and A which all help to reduce the risk of diabetes
• High in fiber and protein which makes them so filling and slows digestion
• They have a low glycemic index which is an important factor for blood sugar control
• Peas were used in the early exploration of genetics
• Available in frozen, fresh, or canned varieties
• Since peas are high in starches, they are considered a starchy vegetable
• There are several different varieties of peas available, including yellow peas, black-eyed peas, and purple peas
• The average pea weighs between 0.1 and 0.36 grams

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/green-peas-are-healthy#TOC_TITLE_HDR_2

Vaping Virtual Sessions and Panel

For Teens & Tweens: Understanding Vaping…Know the Risks and Start the Conversation
March 21 at 6 pm
Have you heard how vaping is on the rise among teens and adults? Join us as we discuss this health challenge. Learn the physical, social and emotional impacts, complete a self assessment and practice a strategy to engage in a conversation with a loved one who might be using. Participants will receive a copy of the presentation they can easily share with others.
Please pre-register. A Zoom link will be provided in the confirmation email.
For Teens by Teens, Answers to Questions about Addictions
March 24, 6-7 pm
Join us as Teen Health and Wellness Ambassadors lead a question and answer session with adults who have overcome the struggle of tobacco, alcohol or drug use. Teens and adults will discuss together the impact of culture and the role that positive lifestyle choices have in healthy living and recovery.
Our guest speaker panel includes Sarah Laurel, founder and executive director of Savage Sisters Recovery, a Philadelphia nonprofit focused on helping those affected by substance abuse disorder and homelessness and JT Frank, founder of Consequence of Habit Inc. (CoH), a non-profit dedicated to empowering individuals and communities by bringing awareness to the impact habits have on our mental health, success and the environment.
A Zoom link will be sent to you upon registration.

 

4th H for Health

Chocolate-Covered Strawberry” Frozen Greek Yogurt Bites

Ingredients 

1/2 cup nonfat blended strawberry Greek yogurt (not fruit on the bottom yogurt)

3 1/2 tablespoons 100% fruit seedless strawberry jelly

4 teaspoons mini chocolate chips

Tooth picks

 

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, combine yogurt and jelly.
  2. Chop chocolate chips and add them to the yogurt mixture, stirring thoroughly.
  3. Spoon mixture into molds, or dollop from a spoon onto a parchment-lined baking sheet. If using molds, tap gently on the counter so the yogurt levels smoothly.
  4. Add “popsicle sticks” if desired
  5. Freeze until solid. Unmold or peel from parchment immediately after removing from freezer, while still thoroughly frozen.
  6. Serve immediately or return to freezer tightly wrapped or packaged in airtight containers.

 

Heart Rate Tracking:

1.Leader will explain the different ways to take your heart rate and how to take pulse and how to calculate heart rate. (# of pulses in 10 secs x 6)

  1. Leader will ask youth to count pulse for 10 seconds and calculate resting heart rate. Youth will then write down resting heart rate.
  2. Leader will start a warm-up and youth will mirror their leader.
  3. Leader will tell youth they are walking in a forest and march in place for 1-2 minutes.
  4. Leader will then tell youth a bear is chasing them and run-in place for 1-2 minutes.
  5. Youth will count pulse for 10 seconds and calculate heart rate, then write heart rate.
  6. Leader plays upbeat music while youth jumps rope to music getting faster as they jump rope for 10-15 minutes.
  7. Youth will take heart rate after jumping rope.
  8. Youth will begin cool-down with slow jump roping for 1-2 minutes. Youth will take heart rate and record it. Youth then stop jumping rope and begin stretching. Leader can decide what stretches youth will do (have youth mirror stretches).
  9. Leader will then talk about reflection with you

Healthy Winter Grains We Should All Eat

The Delaware 4-H Program joins in partnership with GOLO, the pioneering wellness solutions company, to promote and provide important information on winter grains we should all eat to be healthier. We appreciate the monetary support of GOLO to our 4-H program around the initiative of Healthy Living, and their interest in the health and well-being of our 4-H youth. This is a special issue of information we are sharing with all our audiences. 

Please take time to review this information and include more winter grains in your normal daily diets. Look for additional information we will be sharing on a quarterly basis.

Oats

• Commonly used in oatmeal, flour, and dairy alternatives such as milk, yogurt, ice cream
• High protein and antioxidant contents
• Introduced to North America in 1602 by Scottish Settlers
• Help to reduce cholesterol, blood sugar
• Increases growth of good bacteria in the digestive tract
• Used to soothe skin conditions such as eczema and heat rashes
• Typically grown in the Midwest and other northern regions
• There are two kinds of oats – husked and naked
• Oat straw is used by farmers as bedding for cattle and horses due to its soft nature
• Involved in industrial purposes such as glue extender and cosmetic products
• Farmers use a combine harvester to harvest the grains, which are then stored in silos

https://blog.aghires.com/13-oat-facts


Winter Barley

• One of the most cultivated crops in the world
• Barley is resistant to drought, germinates quickly and has short growing season
• Contains 8 essential amino acids, vitamins of the B group, and minerals such as magnesium, phosphorus, iron, zinc
• Has high nutritional value which is important in human diet
• Greatest quantity of produced barely is used as animal food
• Barley is used for malt production and the manufacture of vinegar
• Ancient Egyptians used barley to produce bread
• Barley straw can be placed in mesh bags and float in fishponds to reduce algal growth without pond harm

https://www.softschools.com/facts/plants/barley_facts/944/


Wheat

• Wheat is used for white bread, pastries, pasta, and pizza
• Good source of manganese, phosphorus, and selenium
• Rich in vitamin B, vitamin E, and vitamin K
• Low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium
• Principal cereal crop since the 18th century
• Introduced by the first English colonists and became the main cash crop of farmers
• Wheat is the primary grain used in U.S. grain products
• Grown in 42 states in the United States
• There are 6 varieties of wheat – hard red winter, hard red spring, soft red winter, hard white, soft white, and durum

https://wheatworld.org/wheat-101/wheat-facts/


Cereal Rye

• Good source of fiber, vitamin E, calcium, iron, and potassium
• Reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, colon cancer, breast cancer, and diabetes
• Carb-rich grain which helps to make you feel full
• Incorporated in many baked goods, crackers, and breads
• Once known as “poverty grain” because it grows well in poor soils
• Rye is used as a winter cover crop to capture nutrients and enhance soil health
• Russia is the biggest producer and consumer of rye
• Most often gets processed into flour for bread or fed to livestock
• Whole rye berries can be boiled and consumed, which provide a sweet and nutty taste

https://www.foodrepublic.com/2013/03/01/10-things-you-didnt-know-about-rye-the-worlds-most-underrated-grain/


Quinoa

• Quinoa seeds are flat, oval, and usually pale yellow, and taste varies from bitter to sweet
• Has a crunchy and nutty flavor and is gluten-free
• Consists of high amounts of water, and carbohydrates and low in protein and fat
• Reduces risk of obesity and various diseases and diabetes
• Excellent source of fiber and antioxidants
• Contains several minerals including manganese, phosphorus, copper, folate, and iron
• Quinoa helps with metabolism, growth, and development
• Usually boiled and added to salads, used to thicken soups, or eaten as a side dish or breakfast porridge
• Seeds can be sprouted, ground, and used as flour or popped like popcorn

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/quinoa#vitamins-and-minerals

4th H for Health

January Edition

 

Penguin Snack

Ingredients:

Oval crackers

Pretzel Crackers

Cream cheese

Sliced black olives

Large whole black olives

Carrots

 

Directions:

  1. Cut the large olives into quarters to make wings.
  2. Cut some carrot slices into a few small triangles for the beaks and feet.
  3. Spread the cream cheese on the pretzel crackers.
  4. Place olive slices as head and wings
  5. Place carrots as feet and beak

Enjoy!


Mindfulness Activity:

As the holidays wind down and the days become shorter, many people can begin to have the “winter blues”. Breathing exercises are a great way to practice mindfulness, and soften feelings of  sadness, anxiety, or lethargy.

  • INHALE through your nose for 2 seconds (try to fill stomach with air)
  • EXHALE for 4 seconds, like you’re pretending to blow on hot food
  • INHALE count 2
  • EXHALE count 2
  • Repeat 3x!

 

 

HEALTHY VEGETABLES AND FRUITS WE SHOULD ALL EAT

The Delaware 4-H Program joins in partnership with GOLO, the pioneering wellness solutions company, to promote and provide important information on vegetables and fruits we should all eat to be healthier. We appreciate the monetary support of GOLO to our 4-H program around the initiative of Healthy Living, and their interest in the health and well-being of our 4-H youth. This is the second issue of this information we will be sharing with all our audiences. 

Please take time to review this information and include more vegetables and fruits in your normal daily diets. Look for additional information we will be sharing on a quarterly basis about other vegetables and fruits to eat.

Radishes

• Radishes have been around since the 1500s
• Great low-calorie snack; 1 cup = 19 calories
• Members of the Brassicaceae family, related to kale and broccoli

• California and Florida are biggest radish growers
• Seven million tons of radishes are produced every year
• Several varieties are available year-round
• Harvested before they flower
• Adds a tasty crunch to salads
• Great fresh, juiced, or sauteed
• Good source of vitamin C, potassium, vitamin B6, and calcium
• Natural antioxidant to increase immunity of the body

https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/7-healthy-facts-about-radishes


Swiss Chard

• Also known as silver beet, spinach beet, chard, or Roman kale
• Cooking the swiss chard will remove the bitterness but it can be eaten raw
• Most popular in Mediterranean countries
• Can grow to 28 inches high
• Excellent source of vitamin K that helps support vision, heart, and lung health
• Helps to regulate blood sugar levels, prevent various cancers, improve digestion, and reduce fever and inflammation
• Swiss Chard has a large amount of beta carotene which is linked to healthy eyes
https://www.onehundreddollarsamonth.com/10-fun-facts-about-chard/


Carrots

• Available fresh, frozen, canned, and juiced
• Carrots are a common vegetable throughout the world
• There are over 100 species of carrots
• 87% of a carrot is water
• Good source of vitamin A, important for normal vision and the immune system
• Has a high fiber content that can assist with digestion and protects against diverticular disease
• Contain medical properties that repair damaged cells, maintain health of the skin, cure eye disease, and regulate blood pressure

http://www.vegetablefacts.net/vegetable-facts/carrot-facts/


Beets

• Can be boiled, roasted, or used in juices
• Betacyanin which gives beetroot the color, is an antioxidant that helps with the immune system
• Contains betaine which helps relax the mind and helps to suppress depression symptoms
• Highest sugar content of any vegetable
• Low in sodium which helps to reduce the risk of high blood pressure
• The entire plant is edible, from the tips of the leaves to the roots
• High levels of unique antioxidants and anti-inflammatory contribute to a reduction in the risk of many types of cancers

https://www.thespruceeats.com/fun-facts-about-beetroot-4150509


Kale


• Available fresh and frozen
• Packed with antioxidants and other nutrients which helps lower the risk of cancers
• Full of Vitamin A and K that helps the immune system, bone metabolism, and regulating blood clotting
• Harvested after the first frost to ensure that some starches have turned into sugars
• Contains lutein, a nutrient that helps create the plant’s color and keeps eyes healthy
• Good source of fiber
• Kale is a good source of minerals such as calcium needed for bone health, muscle contractions, and hormone regulation

https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/7-fun-facts-about-kale#1


Winter Squash

• Varieties include pumpkin, spaghetti, acorn, and butternut
• Good source of Vitamin C
• Healthy source of fiber
• Contain polysaccharides that help regulate blood sugar
• Seeds can be prepared the same way as pumpkin seeds
• Full of magnesium and potassium to build strong bones and muscle function
• Certain compounds in squash like beta-carotene and lutein help to protect human cells from the damaging effects of oxygen

Winter Squash


Avocados

• Avocados are high in potassium, which should support healthy blood pressure levels
• California produces 90% of the U.S. crop
• Taste and texture depend on the region their grow from
• Great addition to breakfast meals, side dishes, or entrée topping
• Try substituting an avocado for mayonnaise, when massed, it can provide a creamy texture to any dish
• Ripen an avocado by placing it in a brown paper bag with a banana
• Naturally sugar-free and sodium-free which help reduce the risk of high blood pressure

13 Surprising Facts About Avocados


Grapefruit

• Available fresh, canned, and juiced
• Great source of vitamin C which helps maintain healthy skin, bones, and teeth
• High in vitamin A which helps maintain the immune system
• One of the lowest-calorie fruits
• Contains few calories but lots of water which helps with weight loss
• Grapefruit may help reduce insulin resistance, which may lower the risk of developing diabetes
• Many types of antioxidants that help prevent the development of some chronic conditions

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/10-benefits-of-grapefruit#TOC_TITLE_HDR_8


Tangerines

• Great source of vitamin C and vitamin A important for normal vision and the immune system
• Tangerine peel contains antioxidant, called tangeretin that helps to lower cholesterol
• Contains collagen that will prevent and treat skin damage caused by sun exposure
• High in fiber which helps to lose weight
• Antioxidants protect brain cells from the damage associated with schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease.
• Versatile fruit – can be added to numerous dishes from breakfasts to desserts and cocktails

https://www.webmd.com/diet/health-benefits-tangerines#1


Kiwi

• Kiwi offers a range of nutrients such as fiber, vitamin C, folate, copper, and potassium
• Skin and seeds are edible
• 50 different varieties with flesh ranging from custard-like gold to bright pink
• High amount of vitamin C and antioxidants can help control symptoms of asthma
• Kiwi has an enzyme, actinidin, which can effectively break down proteins in the gut, improving digestion
• Contains lutein an essential nutrient in vision health
• Originated from China and was originally called the “Chinese Gooseberry”

Kiwi Fruit – Benefits, Nutritional Value & Kiwi for Weight Loss

Upcoming National Youth Summits- In-Person!


National Youth Summit on Agri-Science
March 10 – 13, 2022

The Delaware 4-H Program will support two (2) Delaware 4-H youth and one (1) volunteer leader/staff chaperone to attend the National Youth Summit on Agri-Science.

At the National Youth Summit on AgriScience high school students interested in becoming Champions for Agriculture in their communities will gain knowledge and skills in agri-science related to the production of food, feed, fuel, and fiber, especially in the rapidly emerging areas of animal and plant sciences and technologies, learn about challenges facing agriculture, interact with agricultural scientists, researchers, leaders, politicians, and advocates, and increase awareness of career opportunities and pathways in agriculture. Students are trained to create action plans to implement in their communities and teach other youth about what they have learned. The structure of the summits maximizes the amount of hands-on learning experiences and translates that learning to direct outcomes.

This Summit is open to any high school student in grades 9-12 as of September 2021.

Delaware 4-H members must complete an application (attached) to be considered to attend the conference.

This application is due to the State 4-H Office by Wednesday, December 15, 2021

Mail or email application to:
State 4-H Office
531 S. College Avenue
113 Townsend Hall
Newark, DE 19716
Email: de4h@udel.edu

2022-Agri-Science-Summit-Application

4th H for Health

4th H for Health

December Edition

Christmas Banana Snowmen

Materials:

2 bananas

1/4 of a carrot

Handful of currants or sultanas chopped

3 strawberries

6 grapes

6 skewers

 

Directions:

  1. Cut the bananas into thick slices (approx. 9 rounds per banana) –
  2. Peel the carrot and cut into small triangular slivers for a pointy nose –
  3. Trim the stem from the strawberries and then cut in half. You should get two hats out of each strawberry –
  4. Cut the grapes in half. (We only used the smooth half and ate the stem end) –
  5. To assemble, thread three slices of banana on to each skewer followed by a strawberry hat and grape half. Gently press the currents into the banana slices to create eyes and the buttons on the body then add the carrot nose

Enjoy!

 

Bonus Activity:

Energizing Active Breaks

Do each activity for 20-30 seconds:

  1. Jog in place as if the abominable snowman is chasing you.
  2. Take steps in place as if you are snowshoeing
  3. Jump up and down as if you are chestnuts popping on a fire
  4. Reach up as if you are trying to grab the North Star
  5. Jump up as if are jumping into a pile if snow
  6. March in place as if you are a toy soldier
  7. Play the drums as if you are announcing winter solstice
  8. Swim as if you are a in a giant pool of eggnog
  9. Shake your body as if you are a wet Polar bear

4th H for Health- November

Turkey Snack Bags:

Materials:

Clear Plastic Gloves

Popcorn

Goldfish

Red and Orange Felt

Googly Eyes

 

Directions:

  1. Line up your Goldfish in each finger of the glove
  2. Fill the rest with Popcorn
  3. Twist the bottom of the glove and tie it in a knot
  4. Glue on googly eyes on the thumb finger
  5. Cut an orange triangle from the orange felt and an oval from the red felt
  6. Glue the orange triangle to the thumb for a beak
  7. Glue red oval on thumb for the wattle

Enjoy!


Bonus Challenge:
Plogging/ Pliking!

Want to help the environment while improving your physical wellness? Join Delaware 4-H and Consequences of Habit in plogging, an activity that combines jogging and picking up litter. In support of Delaware Goes Purple, we are hosting a plogging campaign, where youth can pick up litter while jogging/walking in their local neighborhoods and parks. This campaign raises awareness of recovery while improving environmental, physical, emotional, and social wellness for all.

The goal of this event is to pick up as much trash as possible while you are out jogging (plogging) or hiking (pliking). Participants have between October 15 – November 30 to complete this event(s). Over the month, weigh how much trash you or your club collect. Clubs who send their total weight collected will be included in a raffle for a $100.00 Amazon gift card.

Plogging for Purple Environmental Event

The first 150 participants will receive a t-shirt, gloves, and a pick up stick per group if needed to use when plogging. ​Email your total weight of trash to krjohn@udel.edu and include a picture of your family and friends plogging to be registered for the gift card raffle.

4th H for Health

October Edition

 

Witch Brooms :

12 Sliced ​​cheese

12 pretzel sticks

12 Fresh chives

 

Directions:

  1. Fold the cheese slice in half and with the help of scissors, cut the fringes of the broom.
  2. Roll with the ‘fringes’ downwards using the pretzel stick as the axis of the broom.
  3. Finally to secure the cheese around the pretzel use a chive to tie a knot

Enjoy!


Bonus Opportunity

Delaware 4-H has partnered with Sussex County Health Coalition to Go Purple for the month of October! To help bring awareness and engage our community to stand up against substance abuse. Please sign the pledge to show your support in this awareness (SIGN THE PLEDGE – Delaware Goes Purple – Hook Development).

At your next club meeting have all members wear PURPLE and take a picture! Send it to Kaitlin Klair at kklair@udel.edu and we will create a collage of all clubs in purple!

For more information, reach out to Lindsay at lgooden@udel.edu or visiting: https://delawaregoespurple.org/

Healthy Vegetables and Fruits We Should All Eat

The Delaware 4-H Program joins in partnership with GOLO, the pioneering wellness solutions company, to promote and provide important information on vegetables and fruits we should all eat to be healthier. We appreciate the monetary support of GOLO to our 4-H program around the initiative of Healthy Living, and their interest in the health and well-being of our 4-H youth. This is the second issue of this information we will be sharing with all our audiences.

Please take time to review this information and include more vegetables and fruits in your normal daily diets. Look for additional information we will be sharing on a quarterly basis about other vegetables and fruits to eat.

Apples

• Apples, fresh, dried, or juiced, offer great nutritional value.
• Over 7,500 varieties of apples are grown worldwide.
• Apple trees take 4-5 years to produce fruit.
• Common varieties include Honey Crisp, Granny Smith, Gala, Fuji, Pink Lady, and McIntosh.
• The crabapple is the only apple native to North America.
• Apples are a heart healthy fruit that help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.
• Apples are fat free, sodium free, and cholesterol free.
• Apples are nutrient dense and filled with vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber.

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/apple/


Broccoli

• Broccoli is great fresh, steamed, or frozen.
• It is very versatile – can be raw or cooked, in casseroles, soups or salads, or in stir-fry.
• It is an excellent source of fiber, Vitamin C, and potassium.
• For the best taste, choose broccoli with a firm stem and tightly packed florets that are dark in color.
• Dark color indicates high nutrient levels.
• Broccoli is present in many ethnic cuisines such as Asian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Southeast Asia, Latino, and Mediterranean.

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/broccoli


Asian Pears

• Ripe Asian Pears are hard and do not soften, unlike traditional pears.
• Pears are a member of the rose family.
• Pears are a good source of fiber which benefits heart health and provides a feeling of being full.
• Pears can help reduce cholesterol and blood pressure.
• They are full of Vitamin C and Vitamin K that help the immune system, bone metabolism, and regulate blood clotting.
• Consumption helps to reduce symptoms associated with coughs, ulcers, and constipation.
• Pears can be eaten both raw and cooked.
• Pears are great for canning and dehydrated purposes.
https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/asian-pears-nutrition-selection-storage/


Brussel Sprouts

• Brussel sprouts are available fresh and frozen.
• Choose firm, compact, bright green sprout heads.
• They are great sources of Vitamins B, C, and K helping with eyesight, immune system, cell growth, and healing.
• Brussel sprouts contain high levels of copper which are important for red blood cell growth.
• Brussel sprouts are very low in sodium and calories which reduces the risk of heart disease.
• The U.S. produces 70 million pounds of sprouts each year.
• The sulforaphane that gives brussels sprouts their unique flavor also helps lower cancer risks.
• They are a very versatile vegetable that can be grilled, stir-fried, or roasted.
https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/brussels-sprouts/

 

Celery

• Celery is highly nutritious and packed with Vitamin C which helps target the immune system.
• When selecting, choose straight, rigid celery stalks with fresh leaves.
• Celery protects heart health and reduces risk of heart disease.
• Celery is a low-calorie vegetable with a high-water content of 95%.
• It is a convenient on-the-go snack or can be incorporated into cooked dishes, stir-fries, or salads.
• Celery is rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds that help fight cell damage, muscle inflammation, and promote overall health.
• Celery has high levels of fiber which help to keep bowel movements regular and aids in weight maintenance.

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/celery/


Lima Beans

• Lima beans should not be eaten raw.
• They are a great source of fiber that helps fuel the colon cells to keep them healthy.
• They are available fresh, canned, or dried.
• Lima beans are rich in manganese which helps to boost bone strength and the body’s ability to process fats and carbohydrates.
• Most pod sizes are wide, flat, and slightly curved.
• They are high in Vitamin B6 which helps create hemoglobin and prevent anemia.
• They contain molybdenum which is important in breaking down toxic substances that enter the body.

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/lima-beans/


Turnips

• Small to medium size turnips are the sweetest.
• They are versatile – both its roots and leafy greens can be eaten.
• Turnips can be boiled, mashed, or eaten raw.
• They are low in fat which helps reduce the risk of some types of cancer.
• Turnips are high in fiber providing aid in digestion.
• They are low in cholesterol levels and saturated fat which helps prevent heart disease.
• Turnips are a great source of vitamin K, A, and C, as well as minerals such as folate, copper, and manganese.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/284815#diet-tips


Cabbage

• Cabbage can be steamed, boiled, stuffed, microwaved, or eaten raw.
• Cabbage is high in dietary fiber folate which is a nutrient needed for growth and production of hemoglobin.
• One cup of cabbage is about 15 calories.
• Drinking juiced cabbage is known to assist in curing stomach and intestinal ulcers.
• Cabbage contains quantities of fiber and iron that keeps the digestive tract and colon in a healthy condition.
• Cabbage is high in Vitamin C which prevents skin diseases, arthritis, and rheumatism.
• Cabbage has a high sulfur content which increases keratin production resulting in healthier hair, skin, and nails.

https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/cabbageandthesciencebehindthem


Pumpkin

• Often used to make jack o’ lanterns for Halloween; pumpkin seeds make a fantastic snack.
• Pumpkin can be prepared either savory in stews and soups or sweet in various desserts.
• Pumpkin is a good source of Vitamin A and Vitamin K that helps support vision, heart, and lung health.
• Pumpkin contains no saturated fat and cholesterol free which helps prevent the risk of coronary heart disease.
• Available fresh and canned for good nutrition and convenience.
• Smaller pumpkins tend to be sweeter.

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/pumpkin/


Sweet Potatoes

• Sweet potatoes are available fresh, frozen, or canned.
• They are low in sodium, fat free, and cholesterol free.
• Sweet potatoes have a high fiber content that can assist with digestion and protects against diverticular disease.
• They are a good source of potassium which reduces the risk of high blood pressure and stroke.
• Sweet potatoes are a nutrient rich vegetable, high in Vitamin A and Vitamin C.
• Consumption has been shown to lower risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and prevent obesity.
• Store sweet potatoes in a cool, dark place for use within 3-5 weeks.

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/sweet-potato/

Healthy Vegetables and Fruits We Should All Eat

The Delaware 4-H Program joins in partnership with GOLO, the pioneering wellness solutions company, to promote and provide important information on vegetables and fruits we should all eat to be healthier. We appreciate the monetary support of GOLO to our 4-H program around the initiative of Healthy Living, and their interest in the health and well being of our 4-H youth. Please take time to review this information and include more vegetables and fruits in your normal daily diets. Look for additional information we will be sharing on a quarterly basis about other vegetables and fruits to eat.

Watermelon

·         Over 1200 varieties of watermelon available

·         Juicy, refreshing, and celebrated summertime treat

·         You can eat the entire fruit – the rind has healthy benefits too!

·         Heart healthy fruit that helps to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease

·         Nutrient dense fruit filled with vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber

·         Low in saturated fat and sugar

·         Contains lycopene which has been shown to reduce the risk of certain cancers

·         Offers great hydration for the body because it is 92% water

 

https://www.watermelon.org/nutrition/watermelons-benefits/#heart-happy)

 

Tomatoes

·         A fruit that can come in a variety of colors including yellow, orange, green, purple, and red!

·         Tomatoes, fresh or canned, offer great nutritional value

·         Rich in lycopene which is good for the heart and effective against certain cancers

·         Packed with Vitamins A and C, calcium and potassium

·         Fat free

·         Low in sodium helping to lower the risk of high blood pressure

·         Cholesterol free which helps to prevent heart disease

 

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/tomato/)

Canteloupe

·         High in Vitamin A which helps to support growth of healthy red blood cells

·         High in Vitamin C which supports blood vessels and development of muscle and cartilage

·         High in the dietary fiber folacin which is a nutrient needed for growth and the production of hemoglobin

·         Fiber helps to reduce risk of heart disease and diabetes, as well as helping you to lose weight making you feel fuller longer

·         Full of potassium which helps with hydration, nerve health and proper muscle contractions

·         Contains phytochemicals that foster heart health and good vision that can boost the immune system and risk of some cancers

·         Good for hydration due to water content of 90%!

 

https://fcs-hes.ca.uky.edu/commodity/cantaloupe

Blueberries

·         Known as a superfood due to low calories and significant health benefits

·         Good source of hydration as blueberries are 85% water

·         Highest level of antioxidants in common fruits and vegetables – these protect your body from cell damage

·         Can help reduce cholesterol and blood pressure

·         Good source of fiber which benefits heart health and provides a feeling of being full

·         Can help maintain brain function and improve memory

·         Helps with insulin sensitivity which can lower chance of diabetes

·         Full of Vitamins C and K that help the immune system, bone metabolism, and regulating blood clotting

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/blueberries/)

(https://blueberry.org/health-benefits/

Bell Peppers

·         Great fresh, frozen, or canned

·         Versatile – can be prepared grilled, sauteed, in soup or sauce, or even raw!

·         Available all year as they are not grown seasonally

·         No saturated fat and cholesterol free which helps prevent the risk of coronary heart disease

·         Low in calories making them a great snack or addition to any meal

·         Excellent source of Vitamin C – the highest of any produce!

·         Color of the pepper indicates how low it was on the vine – green being the earliest removed and red being the ripest

·         Red peppers have the most nutritional value because they are on the vine the longest.  They specifically offer Vitamin A which helps to prevent internal disease.

 

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/bell-peppers/

Corn

·         Low in fat, cholesterol free, and sodium free

·         Has a high fiber content that can assist with digestion and protects against diverticular disease

·         Good source of antioxidants and carotenoids which helps promote eye health and prevent macular degeneration and cataracts

·         Consumption has been shown to lower risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and prevent obesity

·         Full of Vitamin B that is beneficial for overall health

·         Contains potassium which supports healthy blood pressure, heart function, and maintenance of muscle mass

·         Does have higher carb content than other vegetables so need to be mindful of serving size

https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/cash-in-on-the-health-benefits-of-corn

Green Beans

·         Great sources of Vitamins C, A, B, and K helping with eyesight, immune system, cell growth, and healing

·         Contains high levels of iron which are important for red blood cell growth and transport

·         Contain easily absorbed silicon which helps with the formation of healthy connective tissues, strengthens nails and boosts skin health

·         Strong diuretic properties serve as a great detox and help rid the body of toxins

·         High in potassium which helps build muscle and keep the heart healthy

·         Full of specific minerals like iron and zinc that assist red blood cells and muscle, and strengthens the immune system as wound care

https://eatfresh.org/discover-foods/fresh-peas-beans

Cherries

·         Highly nutritious and packed with Vitamin C which helps target the immune system and improve skin health

·         High in potassium helping with muscle contraction, nerve function, blood pressure, and critical body processes

·         Full of fiber improving healthy gut bacteria and digestive flow

·         Rich in antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds that help combat oxidative stress, and fight cell damage, muscle inflammation, and promote overall health

·         Eating cherries can help relieve exercise-induced muscle pain, damage, and inflammation

·         Protects heart health and reduces risk of heart disease by helping to maintain a regular heartbeat and remove excess sodium

·         Reduce symptoms of arthritis and gout by decreasing uric acid

·         Helps improve sleep quality due to melatonin, a substance that helps regulate your sleep-wake cycle

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/cherries-benefits#TOC_TITLE_HDR_3

Summer Squash

·         Very low in calories and are great to add to salads or cook on the grill

·         Cholesterol and sodium free helping to reduce the risk of high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, and hypertension

·         Rich in manganese which helps to boost bone strength and the body’s ability to process fats and carbohydrates

·         Extremely high in Vitamin C that helps to reduce the risk of some cancers

·         Supports eye health and reduces risk of cataracts

·         High in Vitamin B6 which helps create hemoglobin and prevent anemia

·         High-fiber content promotes colon health and prevents constipation

·         High in dietary fiber which helps prevent elevated blood sugar level

·         Contains Vitamin A which helps maintain healthy skin and prevents skin aging

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/summer-squash-nutrition-selection-storage/

https://www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/yellow-vegetables#corn

Peaches

·         Fresh and canned peaches contain many nutrients, but are most important for Vitamins A and C

·         Low in fat which helps to reduce the risk of some types of cancer

·         High in fiber providing aid in digestion

·         Low in cholesterol levels and saturated fat which helps prevent heart disease

·         Compounds found in peaches improve the skin’s ability to retain moisture and improve skin texture

·         Provides protection to skin by helping to retain moisture

·         Help reduce allergy symptoms by preventing the release of histamines in the blood

https://fruitsandveggies.org/fruits-and-veggies/peach/

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/peach-fruit-benefits#TOC_TITLE_HDR_5

Health and Wellness Ambassador Opportunities

Health & Wellness Ambassador Summer 2021 Trainings

Open to all teens ages 13-19, you will be asked to become a Teen Health & Wellness Ambassador upon signing up. 

 

Program: Botvins Prescription Drug Misuse and Abuse training is an opportunity to become a peer educator in avoiding misuse/abuse of opioids and prescription drugs.

Training: Virtual via Zoom either Tuesday June 8th from 7:00pm-9:00pm

Registration: REGISTER HERE! [Register by June 7th]

 

Program: Soccer for Success is a sports-based youth development program incorporating health, wellness, and nutrition in addition to teaching youth participants how to play soccer. *No soccer experience necessary

Training: Virtual via Zoom either Monday June 7th from 6:00pm-7:00pm OR Thursday June 10th from 5:00pm-6:00pm

Registration: Soccer for Success Training [Register by June 4th]

 

Program: EFNEP Building my Body is a 5-lesson curriculum to help youth learn more about nutrition to help “build their body”. Lessons include recipe demos to taste familiar foods, as well as movement, activities, and games.

Training: Virtual via Zoom either June 15th from 5:00pm-7:00pm OR June 17th from 12:00pm-2:00pm

Registration: EFNEP Building My Body Training Registration [Register by June 14th]

 

Program: Up for the Challenge is a 5-part series that focuses on healthy nutrition, physical activity, and body image.

Training: Virtual via Zoom either Wednesday June 16th from 5:00pm-7:00pm

Registration: REGISTER HERE for UFTC TRAINING! [Register by June 14th]

Health & Wellness Ambassador Summer 2021 Meetings

https://www.pcsreg.com/health-and-wellness-ambassador-registration

Summer meetings include guest speaker Kate Angermeier of ChristianaCare presenting on the topics below. We will also share any updates, successes, and activities for stipend opportunities. Teen Ambassadorship is open to all teens ages 13-19

 

June 23rd 2:00pm-3:30pm ThinkFirst for Teens: Injury Prevention

ThinkFirst For Teens, a program of the ThinkFirst National Injury Prevention Foundation, is an award-winning public education effort targeting this high-risk age group. ThinkFirst chapters across the United States and in many other countries present compelling educational presentations at no charge for junior and senior high schools, as well as for colleges and after-school programs. Health educators explain how injuries occur, how they affect the body and how they can be prevented. Students learn that one poor choice can change your life forever, so it is each person’s responsibility to cut the risk for injury to themselves and others by making safe choices.                                                                                                   

July 15th 7:00pm-8:30pm ThinkFirst for Road Safety:

Traumatic injuries are the leading cause of death among teens – in fact, teens and young adults are in the highest risk group for injuries. The most frequent causes are motor vehicle crashes, violence, falls and sports and recreation. Among the most serious injuries are those to the brain and spinal cord, often leading to long term or permanent disabilities that can affect a person’s thinking, speaking, ability to walk, move or even breathe as they could before the injury.  The majority of these injuries are preventable when people use basic safety precautions. This program focuses on road safety, distracted and impaired driving.

August 18th 4:00pm-5:30pm Gun Violence as A Public Health Issue (Formerly the Choice Road Program) 

 

We discuss the epidemic of gun violence, and what that looks like inside and outside of the hospital. Topics covered include types of gun violence, the physical, emotional, and psychological impact of gun violence, Protective Factors, Know the Signs (from the Sandy Hook Promise program) and resources for students in their community. This serves as an informational presentation for any age.

If you have any questions, please contact Alyssa Whittaker