Water

Sustainable landscaping and stormwater management are helping conserve water on campus

Stormwater

Catch Basins to corral and manage stormwater

Acres of Main Campus, all of which collects stormwater

Miles of Stormwater Pipes

Stormwater Management Areas (e.g. ponds, bio-rention basins, bio-swales, green roofs)

Outfalls, where water is released to waterways

Creeks Crossing Campus

Stormwater is not treated before entering streams and lakes. Large parts of the UD main campus refresh local underground aquifers. That means something that goes down a storm drain could pollute someone's well water.

Stormwater takes many forms

Oils

Kitchen Grease

Vehicle Fluids

Pesticides & Herbicides

Fertilizer

Pet Waste

Cigarette Butts

Litter

Leaves and Grass Clippings

Metals

Pet Waste

Pick up after your pet. Pet waste is a leading source of bacterial contamination in drinking and recreational water.

Cigarette Butts

If you smoke, dispose of butts appropriately. They are perhaps the #1 form of litter.

Litter

Carry trash with you until you find a trash / recycle bin. Close trash can lids snugly. Close dumpter lids where available.

Leaves and Grass Clippings

Mulch and compost where possible. Bag and put out for collection. Never sweep down a drain.

Metals

Contain and collect metal dust or shards from auto or boat repairs and dispose in the trash.

Oils

Fix oil leaks in your car and always dispose of used oils correctly.

Kitchen Grease

Freeze extra grease in an old can or jug and throw it away in the trash. Never down a drain.

Vehicle Fluids

Wash cars on grass or at a commercial car wash, where the runoff is treated. Fix any leaks in your car.

Pesticides & Herbicides

Use as little as possible, plant flowers that attract bug-eating critters. Read directions and use sparingly, more is not better for your plants.

Fertilizer

Use as little as possible and never apply before it rains. UD Farm manages animal manure carefully to prevent runoff.

Prevention is key

1 quart of oil can contaminate 2 million gallons of drinking water.

Toxins like herbicides and pesticides kill fish, animals and can contaminate drinking water.

Fertilizers, grass clippings & leaf litter release nutrients into waterways, causing toxic algal blooms.

A large portion of litter is unintentional, picked up by the wind or forgotten.

More than 1 million birds and 100,000 marine animals die each year from litter and debris in the ocean.

Storm water doesn’t come from one big polluter. It comes from all of us, one little bit at a time.

All mowers use mulchers so grass clippings are recycled into the soil.

Pesticides and Herbicides are closely regulated and only used when needed in minimum amounts.

UD is upgrading sprinkler systems to prevent waste and improve plant health.

Fertilizer is applied only as needed, based on soil tests. Minimum amounts are applied.

Our motor shop recycles used motor oil and follows all regulations.

We only use car wash sites with wastewater collection to protect stormwater.

UD is a smoke-free campus

All kitchen oils are sold to be turned into biodiesel

Our shops carefully control metal shavings or dust to protect staff health and the environment.

Everyone can help by preventing litter and picking up litter

How does the
University of Delaware
protect local watersheds?

Sustainable Landscaping

UD strives to incorporate a large percentage of native plants on campus while avoiding aggressive and unwanted species.

Check out some of our many green roofs, bio-swales and bio-rention basins with the map.

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