Edible Research: Material Musings on a Loaf of Bread

January 04, 2021

By Kelly Fu, '22 These strange times are turning our relationship with things upside down. Many of us have not stepped foot inside a museum for months. Even for fellows in the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture, it is a rare treat to roam the museum house and its collections. As a result, we are growing increasingly familiar with the things in our immediate domestic environs: that chip in the same mug we drink from daily, ...

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A City on the Blade of a Knife

December 31, 2020

By Jena Gilbert-Merrill, '22 A panorama on the blade of a knife is not something we are likely to encounter on our cutlery today. This set of forks and knives in Winterthur's collection, featuring cityscapes of Washington, Philadelphia, New York, Boston, and London, stands out for its unusual use of ornamentation. The cities, identified in Gothic lettering on the reverse of the blades, are accompanied by classical embellishment with decorative scrolls ...

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Through the Eyes of the World’s People: The Materiality of Visiting Early Shaker Villages

Color-lithograph print showing Shaker men and Shaker women dressed in traditional Shaker costume dancing in the middle of a Shaker meeting house on a wooden floor. Bonnets, hats, and coats are hung up on the wall behind the dancing members. In the foreground, visitors can be seen in nineteenth century dress watching the ritual.

September 16, 2020

By Christopher Malone, '21 “Having heard of various accounts of the very singular mode of worship practiced by the people called Shaking Quakers, I this day went to visit them.” -Moses Guest, Sunday October 10, 1796 [caption id="attachment_4622" align="aligncenter" width="566"] Woodcut showing a view of Hancock Shaker Village, founded in 1790 by the Shakers in western Massachusetts. The village contains a stone round-barn built in 1826, one of ...

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Tudor Screams and Baroque Dreams: Building a Royal Legacy at Hampton Court

September 02, 2020

By Christopher Malone, '21 Long before the Victorians retrofitted Hampton Court Palace (the palace first began as a manor house in 1086 and was expanded by Thomas Wolsey in 1514 before it was taken by Henry VIII in 1526) with mock-Tudor windows, architectural ad-ons and imagined brickwork, the site went through centuries of development to match the tastes of each successive monarch during their reign and subsequent use of the palace. Cardinal Wolsey ...

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