Finding Similarities

WPAMC Class of 2019 fellows walk through the whimsical garden of Beauport, the Sleeper-McCann House to a ledge that overlooks the blue waters of Gloucester Harbor.

November 14, 2018

By Alexandra Rosenberg, WPAMC Class of 2019   On Saturday, the second-to-last day of our Northern Trip, the WPAMC Class of 2019 travelled to Boston’s North Shore. Once there, we visited Beauport, the Sleeper-McCann House. Beauport was originally the summer home of Henry Davis Sleeper, one of America’s first prominent interior designers. As the first site visit of the day, this house set the tone for the day. For me, not only was this house ...

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Going With the Goats

Six white and brown goats along a fence line, walking away from a beige barn.

November 12, 2018

[caption id="attachment_4019" align="alignnone" width="4032"] The goat and sheep herd’s residence on the Winterthur Estate. Photo by author.[/caption] Since the fall semester began, I’ve spent my Friday mornings with twelve of Winterthur’s permanent residents. My Material Culture courses and quality time in the Winterthur collection are exposing me to incredible objects beyond my wildest expectations, but it’s nice to get some educational ...

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The Room Where She Gave Birth

A young white woman with dark hair and dark eyes poses against a dark backdrop. She wears a turban decked in pearls, and her body is wrapped in a highly draped satin gown. She holds a basket of flowers in her right hand.

November 07, 2018

By Kate Budzyn, WPAMC Class of 2019   In Gloucester, our class visited The Sargent House Museum, the 1780s five-bay clapboard house where one of the first American feminist writers, Judith Sargent Murray, lived and wrote.  In 1790, Murray published “On the Equality of the Sexes,” a short and powerful essay which denied the intellectual inferiority of women and blamed gender-based inequality on girls’ lack of access to ...

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François Boucher, Two Ways

A youth in a classical robe and with black, curly hair looks up and over their shoulder to the left. The image is made of red, black, and white lines suggesting colored chalk.

November 05, 2018

By Joseph Litts, WPAMC Class of 2020   Usually, all I need to hear are the words “French” and “rococo” and I’m sold—add “works on paper” and I’m as happy as a clam. As part of the first-year connoisseurship classes, our prints and paintings block has taken us through the developments of early-modern and modern reproductive printing processes. One of my favorite techniques is the crayon method of engraving, so called because of ...

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