Member Accomplishments

Member Accomplishments

This page consists of member accomplishments within the past two years sent to us by the associated member. These blurbs are posted in the order received and will be kept on the page for a rolling period, based on the amount of new submissions received. If you have accomplishments that you would like to have posted on this page, please send your contributions to Dick Sacher (dsacher@udel.edu), UDARF secretary.


David P. M. Northmore, professor emeritus of Psychological & Brain Sciences, gave a poster presentation entitled The magical number four in visual perception conjured from neural network tinkering at the Champalimaud Research Symposium: Quantitative Approaches to Behaviour and Neural Systems. Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown. Lisbon, October 2018.


Deborah Andrews, professor emeritus of English, received the 2018 Outstanding Article in the International Journal of Business Communication award, given by the Association for Business Communication. The article derives from her ongoing research on the physical environment for communication in 21st century workplaces, supported in part by grants from the UDARF research fund. Citation: Andrews, D. (2017). A space for place in business communication research. International Journal of Business Communication. 54:3, 325-336.


Philip Goldstein, professor emeritus of English, presented a paper entitled “Aesthetic Theory: From Theodor Adorno to Reception Study.” at the Reading Now conference, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel, June 28, 2018. The paper criticized Adorno’s realism and showed that readers of art matter more than art’s aesthetic autonomy.


Lou Hirsh, retired UD director of admissions, received the Margaret E. Addis Service to NACAC Award at the 2017 National Conference of the 16,000-member National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC). The Addis Award recognizes a “NACAC member who has provided the association with unique and outstanding service.”

Hirsh just completed a two-year term as chair of NACAC’s Admission Practices Committee and served as a member of its Steering Committee on Admission Practices, where he helped draft the new SPGP: NACAC’s Code of Ethics of Professional Practices, which was approved unanimously by the NACAC Assembly at its September 16, 2017 meeting.


Lou Hirsh, retired UD director of admissions, presented “College Admission Ethics, Student Rights, and NACAC’s Statement of Principles of Good Practice” at the Delaware School Counselor Assoc. Spring Conference, Dover, DE, Apr. 10, 2017. (NACAC: National Associate for College Admission Counseling)

At its 2017 annual conference, the Potomac & Chesapeake Assoc. for College Admission Counseling (PCACAC) awarded Hirsh its annual Richard L. Apperson Award, the association’s highest honor presented to a PCACAC member “whose career embodies the ideals of the association – providing extraordinary service to students, to PCACAC, and to the college counseling profession.” Williamsburg, VA. Apr 24, 2017

Hirsh also conducted a session with Jim Jump (St. Christopher’s School, Richmond, VA) on “A Preview of the Work of NACAC’s Steering Committee on Admission Practices.” With members of the Steering Committee on Admission Practices, they are re-writing NACAC’s code of ethics for the college admissions profession.


Robert F. Brown, professor emeritus of philosophy, published the book Ferdinand Christian Baur: Lectures on New Testament Theology, translated by Robert F. Brown. Oxford University Press, 2016.


Jay Halio, professor emeritus of English, presented a Perspectives series gallery talk on Aug. 30 at the Old College Gallery in conjunction with the “First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare” and the exhibition “Illustrating Shakespeare: From Boydell to Baskin.”


Lou Hirsh, retired UD director of admissions, participated in an Aug. 3, 2016 webinar, “Ethics and the Early FAFSA” along with Melanie Corrigan Storey, senior director for higher education and student aid policy, Global Policy and Advocacy at The College Board, and Cassie Magesis, director of college readiness, The Urban Assembly, New York, New York. The webinar was hosted by the National Association for College Admission Counseling, the College Board and the American School Counselor Association. On Aug. 29, Hirsh participated in the Higher Ed Live podcast, “FAFSA’s Prior-Prior Year Meets Travel Season,” together with Megan McClean, vice president of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, and Isaiah Tolbert, admissions counselor at Nazareth College in Rochester, New York, and hosted by Adam Castro, vice president of enrollment at Bloomfield College in New Jersey.


Clella Murray, formerly with the College of Education, published a new book, Murder at the University. Barnes and Noble (63 E. Main St., Newark) held a book signing on Wednesday, October 17, 2016.


David Pong, professor emeritus and former chair of the Department of History, led an interdisciplinary study tour this summer to Macau, Hong Kong and Beijing, funded by a Ford Foundation grant to the Hong Kong America Center. Fifteen U.S. students, including three from UD, were paired with 15 Chinese fellows from the Choi Kai Yau College at the University of Macau, where Pong serves as college master.


Gibbons Ruark, professor emeritus of English, has published a new book of poems, The Road to Ballyvaughan. The book is a retrospective of poems Ruark has published “out of Ireland” over four decades. It was published by Jacar Press in  Durham, North Carolina, and there was an Irish printing last winter. The author traveled to Dublin in April to launch the book at the Irish Writers Centre. Also, Ruark published a new poem in The New Yorker in November 2015 and another new poem appeared recently in the Irish Times, recalling a last evening with the poet Seamus Heaney in Dublin in September 2012.


Peter Weil, associate professor emeritus of anthropology, published the article “Ephemera: Writing the Old Way in the Typewriter Age — Culture, Identity, and Signatures in the Acceptance of the Typewriter,” ETCetera, Journal of the Early Typewriter Collectors Association, No. 114, Fall, 2016, pp. 12-17.


William W. Boyer, Charles P. Messick Professor Emeritus of Public Administration, Department of Political Science and International Relations, and Edward C. Ratledge, associate professor and director of the Center for Applied Demography and Survey Research, School of Public Policy and Administration, are co-authors of Growing Business in Delaware: The Politics of Job Creation in a Small State, published by the University of Delaware Press (2016).


A new book by James C. Curtis, professor emeritus of history, focuses on photographers hired by the federal War Relocation Authority (WRA) and shows how their images were shaped by the government’s need to explain and justify the evacuation, confinement and eventual resettlement of over 110,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Discriminating Views: Documentary Photography and Japanese American Internment was the subject of an April 4, 2016 article in the Wilmington News Journal.


Theodore (“Ted”) E. D. Braun, professor emeritus, Department of Languages, Literatures, and Culture, presented “Lies, Slanders, Prevarications, Calumnies: Voltaire and his Fictive Le Franc de Pompignan” at the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Pittsburgh, March 31-April 3, 2016.


Philip Goldstein, professor emeritus of English, University of Delaware-Wilmington, has published an essay titled “Philosophical Postmodernism: From Adorno and Derrida to Foucault” in The Edinburgh Companion to Critical Theory, ed. Stuart Sims, Edinburgh UP: Edinburgh, Scotland, 2016: 145-61.


Peter Weil, associate professor emeritus of anthropology, has published “Ephemera: Typewriters on Parade” in Etcetera, Journal of the Early Typewriter Collector’s Association, No. 112, Spring 2016, pp. 13-18.


Theodore (“Ted”) E.D. Braun, professor emeritus, French and comparative literature, gave a presentation on “Voltaire’s fictive Le Franc de Pompignan,” at SEASECS, Savannah, Georgia, Feb. 25-27, 2016.


Jan H. Blits, professor emeritus of education, has recently published Rome and the Spirit of Caesar: Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” (Lexington Books). It is his ninth book.


Gary May, professor emeritus of history, entertained alumni, students and friends of the University with stories from his book Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy and his involvement with the Oscar-nominated film Selma, at the Delaware Diamonds Society’s annual Authors Series on November 2, 2015 in Philadelphia.


David P.M. Northmore, professor emeritus of psychological and brain sciences, gave a talk titled “Holding Attention for 400 Million Years: A Possible Midbrain Mechanism” on November 11, 2015 at the Department of Biology, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain, and on December 1, 2015 at the Department of Anatomy, University College, London University, United Kingdom.


Jonathan Sharp, professor emeritus of oceanography in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, has been named to the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography’s (ASLO) inaugural Class of Fellows. Initiated in 2015, the ASLO Fellows program honors members who have advanced the aquatic sciences via exceptional contributions that benefit the society and its publications, meetings and other activities. Sharp was named an ASLO Sustaining Fellow. The inaugural Class of Fellows will be honored at the association’s annual meeting in Santa Fe, New Mexico, scheduled for June 5-10, 2016.


Richard Sylves, professor emeritus of political science and international relations, has published Disaster Policy and Politics, second edition, Sage CQ Press, Thousand Oaks, California, 2015.


Theodore (“Ted”) E.D. Braun, professor emeritus, languages, literatures and cultures, organized and chaired a panel on, “Why You Should Know Your Enemies” and delivered a paper on “Voltaire’s Enemy: Le Franc de Pompignan: Intellectual, Urban Planner, Philanthropist” at the South-Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Point Clear, Alabama, February 26-28, 2015 and also at the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Los Angeles, 19-21 March, 2015.

He organized and chaired a panel on “Nation, Port, and Family: Reading, Mapping and Censoring in the Ibero-American Enlightenment” at the International Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Rotterdam 27-31 July 2015. At the East-Central/American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, West Chester, PA 12-14 November 2015 he organized and chaired a panel on “The Eighteenth-Century Version of Email and Social Networks” and delivered a paper on “A Little Corner of Voltaire’s Vast Correspondence”

During 2015 he published two articles: “The Controversy over the Morality of the Theatre in Early Enlightenment France”, Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Theatre Research, vol. 29, no. 1, Summer 2014 (published in 2015) and “Songs Without Music: The Hymnes of Le Franc de Pompignan”, Religion in the Age of Enlightenment, vol. 5 (2015), p. 277-293


Robert Stark, professor emeritus of mathematical sciences and civil and environmental engineering, co-authored (with Carla Morris) two new math books published by John Wiley: Fundamentals of Calculus (August 2015) and Finite Mathematics: Models and Applications (September 2015)


Peter Weil, associate professor emeritus of anthropology, has published “Ephemera: Typewriters Make the News – The Role of Typewriters in Creating and Defining ‘News’ in the United States,” ETCetera, Journal of the Early Typewriter Collectors Association, No. 110, September 2015, pp. 10-15 and 21. Also in that issue, “National News: Change in Initial Production Date of the National Midel 1 (Philadelphia) Type Writer,” p. 9, and, with Martin Howard and Robert Messenger, “New Evidence for the First Portable Typewriter [in 1878],” pp. 16-17 and 21.


Philip Goldstein, professor emeritus of English, University of Delaware-Wilmington, presented two papers at the Reception Study Society conference on Sept. 25-26, 2015 in Fort Wayne, Indiana, one on “Toni Morrison’s A Mercy: The Critique of Patriarchy and History’s Lost Opportunities,” and the other on “Mark Twain’s Detective Fiction: From Pudd’nHead Wilson to the Double-Barrelled Detective Story.” He also presented a paper Nov. 7 on “Toni Morrison’s Beloved: The Forgotten History of Slavery and Patriarchy” at the Society for the Study of American Women Writers in Philadelphia.


Nina Athanassoglou-Kallmyer, professor emerita of art history and a specialist in French art from the 18th to the early 20th centuries, has been appointed the next editor-in-chief of The Art Bulletin. The flagship journal of the College Art Association, The Art Bulletin has been the most prestigious journal in art history worldwide for nearly a century. After a year as editor designate, Athanassoglou-Kallmyer will serve a three-year term, from July 2016 through June 2019, with the March 2017 issue her first as editor. After her editorship, she will remain on the journal’s editorial board as past editor through June 2020.


Jan Blits, professor emeritus of education, has published Rome and the Spirit of Caesar: Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar (Lexington Books).


Leslie F. Goldstein, Judge Hugh M. Morris Professor Emerita of Political Science, presented a paper on Oct. 10 at the annual meeting of the MidAtlantic Law and Society Association in New York City. The title of the paper was “Mendez v. Westminster: the Case that Brought Together Puerto Ricans, Mexican Americans, African Americans, Japanese Americans, and Jewish Americans, and Changed the Face of America.” [from October 16, 2015 UDaily For the Record]


Costel “Cos” Denson, retired Vice Provost of Research, Interim Dean of Engineering, professor of chemical engineering, is the recipient of an honorary Doctor of Science degree from Lehigh University. The Faculty Honorary Degree Committee and the Board of Trustees voted to unanimously to award the degree at Lehigh’s 147th commencement ceremony on Monday, May 18, 2015. Cos was honored for his advances in the sciences.


Victor Klemas, professor emeritus, School of Marine Science and Policy,  is co-editor of Remote Sensing of Wetlands: Applications and Advances, 555 pages, edited by Tiner,, R.W., Lang, M.W. and Klemas, V.V. and published in March 2015 by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, Boca Raton, FL. and New York, NY.  During 2014-15 he has also authored or co-authored a number of articles on remote sensing, including:

Klemas, V. (2015). Remote Sensing of Mangroves. In Tiner, R.W., Lang, M.W. and Klemas, V.V. (eds.) Remote Sensing of Wetlands: Applications and Advances. CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, Boca Raton, FL. and New York, NY. pp. 243-264.
Klemas, V. and Pieterse, A., (2015). Using remote sensing to map and monitor water resources in arid and semiarid regions. Advances in Watershed Science and Assessment. T. Younos and T.E Parece (eds.). Springer International Publishing, Switzerland. 292 p.
Klemas, V. (2014). Remote sensing of riparian and wetland buffers: An overview. Journal of Coastal Research, 30, 869-880.
Klemas, V. (2014). Remote sensing of coastal ecosystems and environments. In C.W. Finkl and C. Makowski (eds.), Remote Sensing and Modeling: Advances in Coastal and Marine Resources, Coastal Research Library 9. Springer International Publishing, Switzerland.
Klemas, V. and Yan, X-H. (2014). Subsurface and deeper ocean remote sensing from satellites: An overview and new results. Progress in Oceanography, 122, 1-9. Elsevier Science Publishing Co., New York, N.Y.
Klemas, V.; Finkl. C., and Kabbara, N. (2014). Remote sensing of soil moisture: An overview in relation to coastal soils. Journal of Coastal Research, 30, 685-696.

Norman B. Schwartz, professor of emeritus of Anthropology, has recently published an essay with A. R. Corzo titled “Swidden counts: A Petén, Guatemala milpa system – production, carrying capacity and sustainability in the Southern Maya lowlands” in the Spring 2015 Journal of Anthropological Research Spring 71:69-93. He has also delivered lectures at CUDEP, University of San Carlos in Petén, Guatemala and Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Mexico. His last short consultancy with the World Bank ended in 2011.


Lou Hirsh, retired UD Director of Admissions and Chair of the Admissions Practices Committee of the Potomac and Chesapeake Association for College Admissions Counseling (PCACAC), and Jake Talmage, Director of College Counseling at the St. Paul’s School in Baltimore, MD, conducted a session entitled, “So What’s Ethical? Current (and Thorny) Case Studies in Admissions Ethics” on April 20, 2015 at the 50th Annual PCACAC Conference at the Omni Homestead in Hot Springs, VA.


The late A. Julian Valbuena, Elias Ahuja Professor of Spanish at UD from 1960 until his retirement in 1999, was honored by the University of Murcia, Spain, where he received his “Licenciatura” (bachelor’s.) degree. Two articles were published in his honor, written by Francisco Javier Diez de Revenga. The first, “Ángel Valbuena Briones, Tras La Estela de Calderón de la Barca, is available online at http://www.udel.edu/002517 and shows his career and list of publications with accompanying photos. The second “Hispanistas murcianos en norteamerica, Angel Valbuena Briones. Discurso de aperture del Curso Academico de 2015,” was published by the Real Academia Alfonso X El Sabio, 2015, pgs. 25-31. Dr. Valbuena died Feb. 5, 2014.


Charles E. Robinson, professor emeritus of English, delivered the 10th Leslie A. Marchand Memorial Lecture at the CUNY Graduate Center in New York City on March 13. His lecture, “Byron and Hazlitt: Inclining Their Ears Towards Each Other,” was organized by The Byron Society of America, and it will be printed in a collection of these Marchand lectures edited by Kathy Kernberger to be published by the University of Delaware Press in 2016.


Richard Davison, professor emeritus of English, presented “A Visit With F. Scott Fitzgerald” on March 16, 2015 at the Newark Senior Center.


The Board of Directors of the National Association for College Admissions Counseling (NACAC) has appointed Louis (“Lou”) Hirsh, Retired Director of Admissions, to a two-year term as Chair of NACAC’s Admissions Practices Committee. His term begins October 1, 2015. The Admissions Practices Committee monitors compliance with NACAC’s Statement of Principles of Good Practice and proposes amendments to that document. NACAC’s 14,000 membership includes secondary school counselors and college admissions officers throughout the United States and many countries overseas.


Nancy King, professor emerita, the University Honors Program, will be leading a workshop at the national meeting of the School Reform Initiative in January 2015 in Tucson, AZ, with Jacy Ippolito, UD class of 2001 and Assistant Professor of Education at Salem State University (MA). The workshop is titled: Facilitating the Use of Imagemaking and Storymaking to Explore a Text.


Robert F. Brown, professor emeritus of Philosophy and former director of the University Honors Program, had two translations published by Oxford University Press in 2014: Hegel: Lectures on the Philosophy of Art, The Hotho Transcript of the 1823 Berlin Lectures, edited and translated by Robert F. Brown; Ferdinand Christian Baur, History of Christian Dogma, edited by Peter C. Hodgson, translated by Robert F. Brown and Peter C. Hodgson


Fleda Brown, professor emerita of English and former poet laureate of Delaware, gave a reading from her newest collection of poems Oct. 29, 2014 on the Newark campus.  The collection is entitled No Need for Sympathy.


Richard Davison, professor emeritus of English, discussed “Actors on Acting” during a presentation Sept. 22, 2014 at the Newark Senior Center.


Leslie F. Goldstein, Judge Hugh M. Morris Professor Emerita of Political Science, presented the Constitution Day Lecture at the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Massachusetts, on Sept. 17, 2014 on the topic, “The U.S. Supreme Court and Racial Minorities.”


Lou Hirsh, retired director of admissions, represented the Admissions Practices Committee of the National Association for College Admissions Counseling (NACAC) in a presentation entitled, “Principles, Ethics, and Shades of Gray,” at the Chief Enrollment Officers’ Forum at NACAC’s 2014 Annual Conference in Indianapolis, Sept. 18-20. He also presented “Think Like a College Admissions Committee” at Sussex Technical High School in Georgetown, Delaware, on Oct. 23, 2014.


The fall 2014 issue of the Virginia Quarterly Review features an article about the late Thomas W. Molyneux, who was a member of UD’s English department faculty from 1967 until his death in 1977. The article, which may be found at www.udel.edu/002389, was written by Stephen Goodwin, author of several novels and two nonfiction books.


John Weiss, retired professor of art, paid tribute to his mentor Minor White in an article, “Minor White and Me,” published Sept. 17, 2014 in The Getty Iris, the online magazine of the Getty. Inthe article, which may be found at www.udel.edu/002390, Weiss describes how the renowned American photographer changed his life.


Nina Athanassoglou-Kallmyer, professor emerita of art history, has been appointed Professeure Invitée at the Université de Paris XIII for fall 2014. Her appointment includes research, seminar presentations and participating in faculty-student activities for the semester.


Joan DelFattore, professor emerita of English and legal studies, wrote “A Professor Emerita Seeks Her New Identity,” looking at the keys to a successful retirement, in the July 14, 2014 issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education’s Chronicle Review.


A special issue of the journal Mathematical Methods in the Applied Sciences has been dedicated to Robert Pertsch Gilbert, Unidel Professor Emeritus of Mathematical Sciences, in honor of his retirement. An editorial in the journal cited Gilbert’s “lifelong achievement in mathematics and its applications and computation” and said the issue can be considered a supplement to a 2012 special issue of Complex Variables and Elliptic Equations that celebrated his 80th birthday.


Philip Goldstein, professor emeritus of English, Associate in Arts Program, Wilmington, presented a paper titled “Mark Twain’s Detective Fiction: From Pudd’nHead Wilson to The Double-Barrelled Detective Story” at the American Literature Association convention in Washington, D.C., May 23, 2014.


David Pong, professor emeritus of history and Asian studies, delivered a lecture on “China’s First Railway: International Relations and China’s Modern Development—Conflict and Contradictions” in Mandarin Chinese as part of the University of Delaware-Peking University Exchange Program on May 7, 2014 at the Center for Classical Chinese Studies at Peking University. He also has been appointed Overseas Senior Research Fellow at the Modern History Centre of the Hong Kong Baptist University. He will serve as an academic adviser for research and publication for the center, and participate in its academic activities for the next five years.


Leslie F. Goldstein, Judge Hugh M. Morris Professor of Political Science Emerita, has three recent publications: “How Equal Protection Did and Did Not Come to the United States, and the Executive Branch Role Therein” in the University of Maryland Law Review 73, December 2013; “Original Meaning, Precedent, and Popular Sovereignty?: Whittington et al. v. Lincoln et al.,” in the Fordham Law Review, November 2013; and a review of The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass: In Pursuit of America Liberty, by Nicholas Buccola, in American Political Thought, fall 2013.


Jeffrey B. Miller, professor emeritus of economics, gave a talk at the Digital CPA CPA2BIZ Cloud User Conference sponsored by the American Institute of CPAs on Nov. 22, 2013. The title of the talk was “Expanding Your Digital Value Via Eldercare and Social Security Advisory Services.”


Clella Murray, formerly with the College of Education, received a 2013 first place award for her book Dangerous Journey from the National Federation of Press Women for young adults.


Theodore Braun, professor emeritus of French and comparative literature, was recently honored in France, where he delivered the introductory speech at the Académie de Montauban on April 16. He was awarded honorary citizenship on his 79th birthday on April 18. For more information, see the UDaily Article.


Willard and Jean Fletcher
The University of Delaware Press has just published Willard and Jean Fletcher’s edition of the memoir of an American diplomat in Nazi- occupied Luxembourg, 1939-1941 – the same time Bill was living there, and discussed in his “Intellectual Journey” talk. A copy of the book’s cover and a description of its contents can be seen onUniversity of Delaware’s webpage for the book.


Philip Goldstein, professor emeritus of English, is the author of “Reception and/or (in)fusion: Interpretation and Literary Institutions in the 21st Century,” in the book Romancing Theory, Riding Interpretation: (In)fusion Approach, Salman Rushdie, edited by Ranjan Ghosh.


Leslie Goldstein, Judge Hugh M. Morris Professor Emerita of Political Science and International Relations, contributed an essay on judicial review around the world to the International Encyclopedia of Political Science (SAGE Reference, 2012).


Thomas Pauly, professor emeritus of English, is the author of a new book Game Faces: Five Early American Champions and the Sports They Changed, published by the University of Nebraska Press. The book looks at five important but nearly forgotten athletes from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.


Theodore Braun, professor emeritus of French and comparative literature

New article: “Le Franc de Pompignan Turns 40: A Midlife Crisis?” New Perspectives on the Eighteenth Century, 9 (2012), 3-13

Conference Papers:

South Central Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 21-23 February 2012: “A Midlife Crisis, or Le Franc de Pompignan Rediscovers Religion”

American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 21-25 March 2012: “Two Eighteenth-Century Spanish Translations of Voltaire’s Tragedy Alzire


Carol Hoffecker, Richards Professor Emerita of History, has published recently.

New Castle, Delaware: A Walk Through Time by Barbara E. Benson and Carol E. Hoffecker tells the history of Delaware’s most picturesque town in the context of its architecture and its neighborhoods. Published by Oak Knoll Press, the book is profusely illustrated with full color photographs and maps.


Fleda Brown, professor emerita of English and former poet laureate of Delaware, has a new blog in which she plans to discuss books, poets, writing and her life since retiring from UD and moving to Michigan. The blog may be found at fledabrown.com/blog/.


Carol E. Hoffecker, Richards Professor Emerita of History, was presented the Governor’s Heritage Award by Delaware Gov. Jack Markell on Delaware Day, Dec. 7, in Dover. The award is presented annually to an individual who has made a distinguished contribution to the recognition, preservation and celebration of Delaware’s heritage.


David L. Mills, professor emeritus,was a pioneer of the early Internet and its precursor networks. As a result, UD’s new research computing cluster has been named for him in his honor. The 5,000-processor, high performance computing cluster will serve the needs of advanced research. Mills, who was professor of electrical and computer engineering from 1986-2008, continues to teach and lead research sponsored by such agencies as the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the National Science Foundation.


Paul Mettler, professor emeritus and former department chair in the Department of Physical Therapy, was named the Brooks Professor and Program Director of the Physical Therapy at the University of North Florida.


Herbert E. Allen, professor emeritus in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering with a joint appointment in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, presented a seminar on “Ecotoxicity of Nickel and Copper in Soil: The Terrestrial Biotic Ligan Model” at Yangtze University and Wuhan University in China. During his stay, he was also appointed a visiting professor at Yangtze University.


Jerry Beasley, professor emeritus and former department chair. The Department of English presented the “The Beasley Fete” on Oct. 13. The event included a roundtable discussion of New Contexts for 18th Century British Fiction: “Hearts Resolved and Hands Prepared,” a collection of essays written in Beasley’s honor.


William W. Boyer, Charles P. Messick Professor Emeritus of Political Science and International Relations and a visiting scholar in the Center for Applied Demography and Survey Research, delivered a lecture “David Hamilton Jackson and the U.S. Navy in St. Croix, 1917-1931,” invited by the Virgin Islands Humanities Council in its program “Peace, Time and Memory,” Oct. 1, at Fort Frederik, Frederiksted, St. Croix. Boyer also undertook two signings of his book “America’s Virgin Islands: A History of Human Rights and Wrongs” during the visit and was interviewed at radio station WSTA in St. Thomas and featured in the St. Croix newspaper The Avis.


Theodore Braun, professor emeritus of French and comparative literature. Elected as a membre correspondant of the Academie de Montauban, founded in 1730 by Jean-Jacques Le Franc de Pompignan, a prominent magistrate and author who was targeted by Voltaire as a dangerous enemy of the philosophies who were trying to alter the course of French society. Professor Braun is recognized both as an expert on Voltaire and a leading scholar of Le Franc de Pompignan. He will be inducted in April 2012.


David Roselle

David Roselle, president emeritus, has been honored by the University of Kentucky, which is naming a new 144-bed residence building on its Lexington campus for him. He was president of UK from July 1987 through December 1989, before serving as UD’s president from May 1990 to July 2007. He is now director of Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library.