Catching the Feels: Being Healthy in Relationships

Wanting to feel connected to others is an important part of life for all of us, and forming healthy relationships is something we strive to do, often without any guidance on how we should do that. If we are lucky, our family and friends provide healthy role models, otherwise we are often left to figure things out on our own. The truth is, all relationships take an investment of time, and ongoing effort to build and maintain. Being healthy in a relationship is not about being perfect, but about trying to be our best selves. Here are some things to strive for as we aspire to #lovebetter and to make sure our relationships are thriving. 

Iwannaknow.org suggests that in a healthy relationship, partners:

  • Are treated with kindness and respect
  • Are honest with each other
  • Like to spend time together, but are comfortable also spending time apart
  • Take an interest in things that are important to each other
  • Respect one another’s emotional, physical, and sexual limits
  • Can speak honestly about their feelings
  • Have fun together and make each other feel good

What Is a Healthy Relationship?

  • Being comfortable with who you are and what you want to do
  • Empowering. It is free from judgment, shame, stigma, coercion and violence
  • Pressure free; not being forced into anything by a partner or by society
  • About respectful relationships
  • Consensual and caring
  • Safe
  • Mutually reciprocated
  • Equally pleasurable for all partners
  • Respecting boundaries. Both your partners’ and your own.

What Do Blue Hens Say about Healthy Relationships

Learn more about healthy relationships and understanding boundaries by watching the videos below:

Alcohol and Sexual Assault

  • Alcohol is the most commonly used date rape drug. 50% – 70% of sexual assaults involve alcohol 1.
  • It is illegal and against UD’s code of conduct to use alcohol as a way to get someone to have sex with you.
  • You cannot consent to sex if you are intoxicated.
  • The UD Helpline is 302-831-1001, press 1 for a Sexual Offense Support (S.O.S.) victim advocate
  • If you are a victim of sexual misconduct while you were drinking, you will automatically receive amnesty

Sexual Offense Support

S.O.S. Victim Advocates are available to call 24/7/365.  Press 1 to reach a victim advocate. The staff member who answers will take a first name and phone number, and an S.O.S. Victim Advocate will call you back within 10 minutes.

kNOwMORE Pledge

This pledge represents your commitment to know more about sexual misconduct and do your part to prevent it. After signing the pledge, you can pick-up a free t-shirt from Student Wellness to recognize your participation and encourage others to take the pledge.

Sexual Misconduct Resource Card

Click to download our Sexual Misconduct Resource Card (pdf), which includes information related to self-care, confidential support services, and bystander intervention.

Blue Hens CARE and Intervene

This guide demonstrates ways Blue Hens can protect and look out for each other by being Active Bystanders.

Choosing Well at UD

Click on the images or titles below to explore the "Choosing Well at UD" series which includes information about topics such as substance use, safer sex, healthy relationships, stress management, and more.

  1. Klein, L. B., Rizzo, A. J., Cherry, L. H., & Woofter, R. C. (2018). Addressing alcohol’s role in campus sexual assault: A toolkit by and for prevention specialists. Chapel Hill, NC: Campus Advocacy and Prevention Professionals Association and Prevention Innovations Research Center. https://cola.unh.edu/sites/cola.unh.edu/files/media/SAAlcToolkit