SIT 2018 Schedule

Below is an overview of the SIT 2018 schedule and in-depth descriptions for each session.

SCHEDULE OVERVIEW

SESSION INFORMATION

DAY ONE

Small changes = big differences: Teaching practices that work in all courses


Presented by: Stephanie Foote

Time: May 30th | 9:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.

Location: ISLL first floor lounge

Format: Keynote

Materials to bring: Writing utensils and paper

Description: Participants will leave this keynote with practical strategies and approaches they can incorporate in their courses immediately to increase student learning and engagement.

Large classes, high-impact practices


Presented by: Stephanie Foote

Time: May 30th | 10:20 a.m. – 12:25 p.m.

Location: ISLL 215

Format: Keynote Break-out Workshop (seats are limited)

Description: This interactive workshop will help participants identify strategies and approaches, from the keynote address, that they can intentionally incorporate in their gateway courses to increase learning and engagement of all students.

Embracing the “G” word: Thinking critically about the research process


Presented by: Lauren Wallis, Andy Ross, Allison Tharp, Delice Williams

Time: May 30th | 10:20 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.

Location: ISLL 207

Format: Interactive Workshop

Description: In Spring 2018, a cohort of instructors met to discuss how we can better support students throughout the arc of the research process, from selecting and narrowing topics to synthesizing outside sources with their own ideas. One of several themes that emerged from our community of practice was the complexity of navigating between Google and scholarly search tools and sources. Students’ existing strategies for finding and evaluating information might feel at odds with scholarly sources and search tools, and sometimes they are required to put aside the familiarity of Google entirely, in favor of library databases. In this session, we approach teaching research as an integrated process, highlighting activities designed to help students build on their existing information practices and draw connections between phases of research. The interactive session will focus on strategies and activities to help students think critically about their search practices and evaluation strategies across platforms, and participants will leave with concrete ideas to bring into their classrooms.

Introducing computational reasoning


Presented by: Kevin Guidry, Jennifer Lambe, Shannon Miller, Chrystalla Mouza, Victor Perez, Lori Pollock, Kathy Pusecker, Daniel Stevens

Time: May 30th | 10:20 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.

Location: ISLL 202

Format:

Description: “Computational Reasoning” is a General Education objective for all undergraduate students at UD.  In this session, faculty and staff with an NSF-funded project to explore computational reasoning and its place in UD courses will introduce the concept and help faculty begin thinking about how it relates to their discipline and their courses.  At the completion of this session, attendees will be able to (a) define computational reasoning, (b) describe how it is being taught at UD, and (c) begin thinking about how it can be integrated into their courses.

Responding to sticky situations


Presented by: Corrin Omowumni & Naomi Nash

Time: May 30th | 11:25 a.m. – 12:25 p.m.

Location: ISLL 207

Format: Discussion & Informational

Description: There are lots of resources on campus to help students deal with challenges they encounter in and out of the classroom, but it isn’t always easy to make the right connections. This session will give participants the opportunity to discuss common challenges (e.g. frequent lateness or absence, poor performance on exams, inability to work well in teams…) and find the appropriate campus supports. Colleagues from Academic Enrichment and the Blue Hen Success Collaborative will provide participants with resources and quick links to help smooth over those sticky situations.

Showcasing UD faculty experiences with computational reasoning


Presented by: Kevin Guidry, Jennifer Lambe, Shannon Miller, Chrystalla Mouza, Victor Perez, Lori Pollock, Kathy Pusecker, Daniel Stevens

Time: May 30th | 11:25 a.m. – 12:25 p.m.

Location: ISLL 202

Format:

Description: This session will feature several UD faculty in different disciplines (e.g., communication, math, music, sociology) who have successfully infused computational reasoning into one of their courses as part of the NSF-funded project at UD to do this work.  At the completion of this session, attendees will be able to (a) describe several different ways that computational reasoning has been infused into courses at UD and (b) provide several examples of specific computational reasoning activities that faculty have successfully used in their courses.

Learning with and from classroom research


Presented by: Josh Wilson, Beth Morling, Michelle Cirillo, Deborah Allen

Time: May 30th | 1:50 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

Location: ISLL 215

Format: Faculty Panel

Description: Many of our colleagues conduct research about learning in their own classrooms, while others conduct studies in k-12 classrooms with important impacts on college learning. In this panel discussion, you’ll hear from your colleagues who are engaged in this work, and learn more about how this research is conducted and what questions they are striving to answer. Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions of the panelists and to spark ideas about their own classroom research.

Using Canvas analytics data to improve student learning


Presented by: Mu He

Time: May 30th | 1:50 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

Location: ISLL 202

Format: Informational Session

Materials to bring: Laptop recommended

Description: Participants will leave this session with a knowledge of what analytics features are available in Canvas and how to use these analytics tools to gain insights into their courses. Participants will also learn about external tool integrations in Canvas and how to use/request them. 

Provost’s E-Learning Initiative Faculty Panel


Presented by: Jack Baroudi, Kathryn Berkow, Karen Hoober, Kristen Ritchey

Time: May 30th | 2:55 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.

Location: ISLL 207

Format: Faculty Panel

Materials to bring: Web enabled device recommended

Description: By the end of this session participants will be able to discuss considerations for developing an online program, identify resources available to faculty interested in developing online courses and programs, recognize some of the commons challenges in launching an online course or program, and apply tips and strategies for online course and program development. 

Providing students feedback at scale: defeating the passive learning monster


Presented by: Jackie Fajardo & Annie Renzetti

Time: May 30th | 2:55 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.

Location: ISLL 215

Format: Informational & discussion

Description: Defeat the passive learning monster during and outside of class. This session offers strategies leveraging: tips to connect names to faces, document camera or Doceri for illustration labeling, iClicker, and other UD supported tools you may not know exist. Through open discussion, colleagues will identify student feedback gaps that often develop in larger classes. A hands-on activity will guide participants through the reflective development of challenging multiple choice questions that can be utilized in class as iClicker activities or online as Canvas quizzes, optimizing the Test-Test-Study-Test model. Participants will leave with a greater appreciation for resourceful tools that help engage and inform the large lecture experience.

Wine & Cheese Reception


Time: May 30th | 3:55 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Location: ISLL courtyard (ISLL lounge if inclement weather)

Format: Reception

Description: Join your colleagues in celebrating teaching at our wine & cheese reception following the first day of SIT. 

DAY TWO

What comes after diversity? Campus realities and classroom inclusion


Presented by: Sean Eversley Bradwell

Time: May 31st | 9:00 a.m. – 10:10 a.m.

Location: ISLL first-floor lounge

Format: Keynote

Description: For many institutions, “diversity” is a numerical goal. We measure our success in achieving “diversity” by the percentages and proportions of student identities and academic achievements. And yet, what comes after diversity? What comes after presence on campus or in a major discipline? This interactive talk will explore current practices of “diversity” and the role of inclusion and inclusive pedagogy in college and university classrooms.

Teaching & learning with a new(er) generation of students


Presented by: Sean & Nicole Eversley Bradwell

Time: May 31st | 10:20 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.

Location: ISLL 215

Format: Keynote breakout session

Description: Gen Z. iGen. Centennials. The Über Generation. The names may change but one thing is certain, there is a new generation of student coming to our campuses. Currently identified as the most racially diverse, the most technologically savvy, and far more pragmatic than their Millennial counter-parts, Generation Z will continue to challenge traditional programs and practices in higher education. This workshop explores the major characteristics of Gen Z and subsequent impacts on educational approaches to promote diversity and foster inclusion.

Managing group projects


Presented by: Katy Berkow & Christina Wesolek

Time: May 31st | 10:20 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.

Location: ISLL 207

Format: Interactive workshop

Description: Many students struggle with working effectively in groups, even when they can recognize the value of the activity or project. This faculty-led session will introduce participants to some easy-to-employ group work activities, and allow participants to create more effective and engaging group work experiences in their classrooms.

Creating, evaluating, and adopting Open Educational Resources and Open Textbooks


Presented by: Klaus Theopold, Meg Grotti, Gracy Adeneye, Claire O’Neal

Time: May 31st | 10:20 a.m. – 11:20 a.m.

Location: ISLL 202

Format: Hands-on Workshop & Faculty Panel

Description: If you are redesigning a course and are interested in supporting your students’ success by reducing course costs, join us for a discussion and hands-on workshop on the topic of open educational resources and open textbooks.  University of Delaware faculty members who have created open educational materials that are used nationally and locally will discuss their experiences creating these open resources, and librarians who specialize in open educational resources will lead participants in a hands-on exploration of open textbooks and other no-cost, openly licensed materials that can support your students’ learning while reducing barriers to their successful learning.

Getting your students to read everything (including the syllabus!)


Presented by: Bill Lewis

Time: May 31st | 11:25 a.m. – 12:25 p.m.

Location: ISLL 207

Format: Interactive Workshop

Materials to bring: Writing utensils and a sample reading assignment from your class

Description: One of the answers to the question, “Why don’t students read?” is that students do not see a purpose for reading, or readings are rarely discussed in class. In this way faculty lose a critical opportunity to purposefully use readings for student engagement and extension of their knowledge. In this session participants will learn how to describe the important role of background knowledge and purpose setting on student reading comprehension. Participants will also learn how to use research-based strategies to prepare students for the challenges of reading disciplinary material and how to plan post-reading activities that encourage students to synthesize what was read. 

Observing & documenting classroom teaching


Presented by: Kevin Guidry, Terry Harvey, Hannah Kim

Time: May 31st | 11:25 a.m. – 12:25 p.m.

Location: ISLL 202

Format:

Description: Classroom observations can be powerful ways to gather meaningful information about teaching and learning.  This information can be provided to faculty to help improve teaching and it can also be used as data in educational research.  In this session, UD faculty and staff who have conducted classroom observations will share their experiences and resources.  At the completion of this session, attendees will be able to (a) select an appropriate course observation protocol and (b) observe a class to provide feedback for a colleague or inform educational research.

Infusing computational reasoning into your course


Presented by: Kevin Guidry, Jennifer Lambe, Shannon Miller, Chrystalla Mouza, Victor Perez, Lori Pollock, Kathy Pusecker, Daniel Stevens

Time: May 31st | 1:50 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.

Location: ISLL 202

Format: Hands-On Workshop

Description: Faculty who would like to explore infusing computational reasoning into one of their courses are invited to bring their syllabi and course materials to this workshop to work with faculty and staff who have previously worked with UD faculty to do this in their courses.

Hearing & learning from UD students


Presented by: Mark Serva

Time: May 31st | 1:50 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.

Location: ISLL 215

Format: Interactive Workshop

Description: We asked UD students about their experiences with group work, and what practices faculty members can use to make them feel more welcome. In this session, you’ll hear their reflections and the practices that made an impact. You’ll have an opportunity to discuss their comments with your colleagues and consider what strategies make the biggest impacts on student learning.

Showing achievements: poster and demo sessions


Time: May 31st | 2:55 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.

Location: ISLL Lounge

Format: Poster session

Description: 

Uncommon Artifacts and the Common Reader: Introducing First-Year Students to Special Collections and Museums

Office of Academic Enrichment

Faculty Commons Partners

Canvas

iClickers

UDCapture

Instructional Improvement Grant- Stephanie Kerschbaum (Scholarly Teaching Group)

National Survey of Student Engagement Town Hall High Impact Practices

Instructional Improvement Grant- Sujata Bhatia

Instructional Improvement Grant- Julia Bayuk

Instructional Improvement Grant- Rusty Lee

Instructional Improvement Grant- Claire O’Neal

Instructional Improvement Grant- Ruth Fleury-Steiner

Collaborating to Build A Pathways Model Program: Academic Transitions at the University of Delaware

Student Multimedia Design Center

Survey Research Lab

Consulting with teaching and technology with Faculty Commons


Time: May 31st | 2:55 p.m. – 3:55 p.m.

Location: ISLL Lounge

Format: Discussions & consultations

Description: 

  • ATS | Canvas, iClickers, Google: Drive (Team), Sites, Slides
  • CTAL
  • Library | Digital Scholarship Librarian
  • ELI | Consulting with faculty for UD Content course additions to Pathways and 50/50 UD courses and or student advising for language challenges in UD classes
  • PCS | Teaching (Virtually) Everything: VR/AR for Online Learning: Sample the latest augmented reality and virtual reality apps for Android and Apple iOS devices at the Teach (Virtually) Everything: VR/AR for Online Learning table. Some of the apps available will allow you to dissect a frog, explore a life-sized human body, or drive around the moon in the lunar rover during the Apollo 15 mission. Bring your own tablet or smartphone, or use one of the devices available to immerse yourself in the newest AR and VR technology. The UD Online Testing Center: Computer-based Proctoring Services: Are you looking for a secure testing environment that will deter academic dishonesty and verify students’ identities? Do you need a scalable proctoring solution for a large class? Do you need help digitizing your paper or scantron exams for Canvas? Are you interested in remote proctoring services for online courses? Visit the UD Online Testing Center’s table to learn more about our services.
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