Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 10:20 a.m. – 12 noon
Location: 208 Gore Hall

Supplemental materials:
SFI2016: Information Literacy and Metaliteracy Toolkit

How can an oral history project help students tackle the contextual nature of authority?  How does the creation of broadsides based upon an historical collection help students examine how the format in which information is delivered impacts the way it is received?  What unique opportunities to examine audience does the creation of a video present to students? Would the experience of creating a data-layered city map increase students’ ability to analyze aspects of inequality along lines of race and class?

This workshop will provide some insight into these questions by highlighting innovative assignments which challenge students to critically engage with information by placing students in the role of creator.

The workshop will feature four lightning talks by faculty members and librarians that will detail these student projects.  Following the lightning talks, participants will have the opportunity to engage in a cross-disciplinary discussion of the challenges inherent in fostering information literacy among students and ideas for taking a metaliteracy-inspired approach to these challenges.

 

Moderators

Meg Grotti

Meg Grotti    
Associate Librarian and Assistant Head of Instructional Services, Reference and Instructional Services Department, University of Delaware Library

Meg Grotti is an associate librarian and Assistant Head of Instructional Services at the University of Delaware Library, where she provides leadership and support for the cross-departmental team of librarians who provide instructional services.  Meg also serves as library liaison to the School of Education.  Meg holds an MLIS from Syracuse University and an M.Ed in Educational Technology from the University of Delaware.

Tom Mackey

Tom Mackey    
Vice Provost for Academic Programs, SUNY Empire State College

Thomas P. Mackey, Ph. D. is Vice Provost for Academic Programs at SUNY Empire State College. His academic and professional interests are focused on the collaborative development of metaliteracy.  He is interested in the connections to open learning, the design of innovative social spaces, and the critical engagement with emerging technologies. His partnership with Trudi Jacobson to originate the metaliteracy framework emphasizes the reflective learner as producer and participant in dynamic information environments. They co-authored the first article to define this model with Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy (2011) and followed that piece with their book Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (2014).  This team co-authored the essay Proposing a Metaliteracy Model to Redefine Information Literacy (2013) and a new co-edited book for ALA/Neal-Schuman entitled Metaliteracy in Practice (2016). Previously they co-edited several books on faculty-librarian collaboration and co-authored several articles about information literacy. Tom is part of the editorial team for Open Praxis, the open access peer-reviewed academic journal about open, distance and flexible education that is published by the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE). He is also a member of the Advisory Board for Progressio: South African Journal for Open and Distance Learning Practice. Connect with Tom via LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/thomasmackey and Twitter: @TomMackey.


How can an oral history project help students tackle the contextual nature of authority?

Roger Horowitz

Roger Horowitz    
Associate Director of the Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society, Hagley Museum and Library, and Professor, History

Roger Horowitz is Associate Director of the Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society at the Hagley Museum and Library and Professor of History at the University of Delaware. He has published widely in the area of food history, most recently Kosher USA: How Coke Became Kosher and Other Tales of Modern Food. Oral history has been a part of his research and teaching activities for 30 years. In the mid-1980s he worked on a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to interview workers in the American meatpacking industry. These interviews were a major source for his dissertation, and some excerpts were published in his book, Meatpackers: An Oral History of Black Packinghouse Workers and their Struggle for Racial and Economic Equality. Since then Dr. Horowitz has continued to use oral interviews as part of this research, taught many oral history training sessions, and offered courses on oral history at the University of Delaware, most recently on the history of Newark’s Chrysler assembly plant. He has served as President of Oral History in the Mid-Atlantic Region and as a member of the executive council of the Oral History Association.

L. Rebecca Johnson Melvin    
Librarian and Head, Manuscripts and Archives Department and Curator of the Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Senatorial Papers, University of Delaware Library
L. Rebecca Johnson Melvin is Librarian and Head of the Manuscripts and Archives Department and Curator of the Joseph R. Biden, Jr., senatorial papers at the University of Delaware Library.  She is responsible for all aspects of collection development and of supervising staff involved in managing the primary source collections, which range in format from traditional works on paper to photographs to audio-visual recordings to born-digital media, including web sites.  Her professional and publishing activities reflect experience with congressional collections and political papers, literary manuscripts, women's collections, regional history (Mid-Atlantic), scrapbooks as an archival genre, photography and visual materials in collections, archival description standards, and conservation of archival collections.  She is involved with planning digital initiatives using manuscript collections and outreach for primary sources including instruction, exhibitions, and internships.  She is co-author with UD faculty Deborah C. Andrews and Vicki Cassman of “Learning as Doing: Undergrads Using Special Collections for Conservation and Material Culture Studies,” in Past or Portal: Enhancing Undergraduate Learning through Special Collections and Archives  (ACRL 2012).

How does the creation of broadsides based upon an historical collection help students examine how the format in which information is delivered impacts the way it is received?

Martha Carothers

Martha Carothers    
Professor, Art & Design

Martha Carothers teaches typography and image in the Visual Communications program, along with book arts. Visual design projects in her courses integrate the plethora of resources in Morris Library Special Collections, University Museums, and Faculty Commons. Carothers is a past chairperson of the Department of Art, former Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, and previous Associate Director of University Undergraduate Studies.

Curtis Small

Curtis Small    
Assistant Librarian and Coordinator, Public Services Special Collections Department, University of Delaware Library

Curtis Small is Assistant Librarian in the Special Collections department of University of Delaware Library. As coordinator of public services for the department, he handles instruction, reference requests and also coordinates exhibitions. Curtis has a particular interest in the history of the book and in African American print culture. He is also a project member for Colored Conventions, a digital humanities project here at UD. Prior to obtaining an M.L.I.S. degree in 2013 (Simmons College), he earned a Ph.D. in French from New York University, and taught French language and French and Francophone literature at the college level, with a focus on Haitian literature."

 


What unique opportunities to examine audience does the creation of a video present to students?

Hannah Lee

Hannah Lee    
Senior Assistant Librarian and Program Coordinator, Multimedia Literacy, Multimedia Collections and Services Department, University of Delaware Library

Hannah K. Lee is a senior assistant librarian and program coordinator for the multimedia literacy program in the Student Multimedia Design Center at the University of Delaware Library. Her responsibilities include collaborating with faculty across departments and assisting students in creating multimedia content. She has a B.A. in English with a minor in Education, an M.A. in English with a specialization in Writing Studies, and an M.S. in Library and Information Science, all from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Michael McCamley

Michael McCamley    
Associate Professor, English

Michael McCamley's research and teaching interests include composition pedagogy and theory, literacy studies, writing program administration, and creative writing pedagogy. He has taught courses in first-year composition, honors composition, creative writing, professional writing, and literature, and developed on-line writing courses for distance education. His work has appeared in WPA: Writing Program AdministrationCollege Composition and Communication, and College English, and his creative work has received several honors, including a production by the University of Arizona Theatre Department.


Would the experience of creating a data-layered city map increase students’ ability to analyze aspects of inequality along lines of race and class?

Jessica Edwards

Jessica Edwards    
Assistant Professor, English

Jessica Edwards, Ph.D. has developed and taught courses in professional writing, critical race studies, and composition studies. Her scholarship considers ways to engage critical race theory, the intersections of race, racism, and power, in writing classrooms. Dr. Edwards was a Faculty Diversity Scholar in 2015 with the Center for Teaching, Assessment, and Learning at UD and her scholarship has appeared in Computers and Composition Online.

Linda Stein

Linda Stein    
Librarian, Reference and Instructional Services Department, University of Delaware Library

Linda Stein, M.S., M.A. is a Reference and Instructional Services librarian at the University of Delaware Library with subject responsibilities for English and American literature, comparative literature, theatre, and fashion and apparel studies. She has contributed articles on information literacy instruction to Reference Services Review and Research Strategies, and is the co-author of Literary Research and the American Realism and Naturalism Period: Strategies and Sources.

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