Recent and ongoing areas of research and associated projects:

Since the 1980’s I have been conducting research that focuses on intergenerational relationships and development across a variety of contexts. While most of the research has focused on various aspects of father-child relationships, understanding the contexts and consequences of fathering for men and their families has led to research and theory development regarding factors influencing father involvement, including birth attendance and bonding, masculinity, femininity, androgyny and other personality factors, different patterns of transitions to parenthood, work patterns and career development, gender equity in division of labor, the effects of timing on father involvement, fathering and religious faith, and men’s perceptions of midlife development as they are effected by fathering, work and marriage. Ongoing research projects inform my teaching and community service, which, in turn, pose new research questions and theoretical considerations.

 

A Resource Theory of Fathering

In November of 2014, together with Jimmy Hull and Kimmy Dutton, I presented A Resource of Fathering at the Theory Construction and Research Methodology preconference at the National Council on Family Relations in Baltimore, MD.   Click here for a copy of the paper.  A revised version of the paper appears in The Journal of Family Theory and Review.  I  have begun to collaborate to collect qualitative interview data from diverse groups of fathers. We are investigating how men with diverse social addresses perceive, garner, and deploy fathering resources to enhance their involvement and relationships with their children.

Father-Child Relationship Quality

In November of 2018, I presented a paper at the Theory Construction and Research Methodology preconference at the National Council on Family Relations in San Diego.  The paper presents a historical and theoretical review of the field of fathering as it has transitioned from a focus on father involvement toward father-child relationship quality (FCRQ).  In it, I show why  FCRQ is the better lens for understanding father-child relationships over time and present ways to move fathering scholarship into deeper consideration of FCRQ.