PBL2019 Program At-a-Glance

Wednesday, January 9
  1. Welcoming remarks
  2. Forming groups: Take 1
  3. Experience it yourself: The student experience in a PBL classroom
  4. Reflection and questions
  5. Forming groups: Take 2
  6. Survey of problem types and sources
  7. Intro to problem-writing: Constructing a well-formed problem
  8. Problem-writing activity 1
  9. Reflections on day 1
Thursday, January 10
  1. Addressing questions from day 1
  2. Getting started: Building a framework for a PBL course
  3. What elements and processes make a good PBL problem?
  4. Problem-writing activity 2
  5. Matching assessments with your problem and student learning
  6. Problem-writing activity 3: Advanced problem-writing
  7. Reflections on day 2
Friday, January 11
  1. Addressing questions from day 2
  2. XBL: Experiment-based learning using Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs), project-based learning, client-based projects
  3. Maintaining institutional momentum for teaching transformation
  4. It’s not just group work any more: Intro to team-based learning
  5. The small teaching approach to course changes
  6. Final touches on participant gallery walk presentations
  7. Gallery walk with participant problems
  8. Mad minute: Best ideas, best practices, takeaways

Welcoming remarks

Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2019
Time: 9:00-9:15 a.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 215

Facilitators:
John Pelesko, Phil Duker

Description:
Welcome to PBL2019!  The welcoming remarks will set the stage for the next three days along with considerations for how to make the most of the sessions.

Forming groups: Take 1

Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2019
Time: 9:15-9:45 a.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 215

Facilitators:
Jackie Fajardo, Adebanjo Oriade

Description:
Forming students groups that work together productively and cohesively is an integral part to problem-based learning.  Throughout the 3 days, you’ll experience many techniques for forming and working with student groups.

Reflection and questions

Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2019
Time: 11:00-11:30 a.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 215

Facilitators:
PBL2019 facilitation team

Description:
Being a reflective practitioner is valuable for developing your abilities using problem-based learning.  Reflective sessions are an opportunity to start making connections immediately and to apply the session activities to your own teaching situation.  This session will be a reflection on the experience-it-yourself problem.

Forming groups: Take 2

Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2019
Time: 1:00-1:15 p.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 115

Facilitator: Hal White

Description:
Forming students groups that work together productively and cohesively is an integral part to problem-based learning.  Throughout the 3 days, you’ll experience many techniques for forming and working with student groups.

Survey of PBL problem types and sources

Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2019
Time: 1:15-2:45 p.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 215

Facilitators:
Jackie Fajardo, Agnes Ly

Description:
A primary activity of the PBL instructor is finding and creating good problems. What characterizes a good problem for a PBL classroom? What should we think about when we create and test our own problems?

Introduction to problem-writing

Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2019
Time: 3:00-3:30 p.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 215

Facilitator: Mark Serva

Description:
Following a discussion of the features of good problems, participants will begin to write materials suitable for a problem-based course. They will learn how to recognize potential situations, experiences, and events which can successfully be developed into problems. By the end of the session, each participant will have an initial draft of a problem scenario linked to learning objectives for a course they plan to teach. A problem-writing worksheet will help to organize the development process, both during and after the workshop.

Problem-writing activity 1

Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2019
Time: 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 215

Facilitators:
PBL2019 facilitation team

Description:
In this hands-on activity with multiple facilitators, participants will create a new problem that might be used in one of their classes. This problem-writing activity will be followed up with more time for constructing an engaging problem.

Reflections on day 1

Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2019
Time: 4:30-5:00 p.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room TBA

Facilitators:
PBL2019 facilitation team

Description:
Being a reflective practitioner is valuable for developing your abilities using problem-based learning.  Reflective sessions are an opportunity to start making connections immediately and to apply the session activities to your own teaching situation.

Getting started: Building a framework for a PBL course

Date: Thursday, January 10, 2019
Time: 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 215

Facilitators:
Hal White

Description:
Student-centered, inquiry-based instruction is different from more traditional teaching in many ways. This session will help participants to plan for a revised or new course, including what to put in a syllabus, and how to introduce students to these methods..

Problem-writing activity 2

Date: Thursday, January 10, 2019
Time: 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room TBA

Facilitators:
PBL2019 facilitation team

Description:
This is a continuation of problem-writing activities, in consultation with multiple facilitators and participants from cognate disciplines.  In this hands-on activity with multiple facilitators, participants will create a new problem that might be used in one of their classes. Problem-writing activity will be followed up with more time for constructing an engaging problem.

Matching assessments with your problem and student learning

Date: Thursday, January 10, 2019
Time: 2:30-3:30 p.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 215

Facilitators: Kevin Guidry, Stacie Larkin

Description:
In this hands-on session, together we will refine your student learning objectives and problem activities allowing you to develop a plan that (a) monitors students’ progress in and perceptions of the activities and (b) determines how well students are meeting the learning objectives.

Problem-writing activity 3: Advanced problem-writing

Date: Thursday, January 10, 2019
Time: 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 215

Facilitators:
PBL2019 facilitation team

Description:
In a continuation of the earlier writing activities, participants will continue to work on and refine their written problems. This session will highlight ideas for presentation of a problem or case in multiple stages, using techniques for progressive disclosure of information needed for problem resolution.

Reflections on day 2

Date: Thursday, January 10, 2019
Time: 4:30-5:00 p.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room TBA

Facilitators:
PBL2019 facilitation team

Description:
Being a reflective practitioner is valuable for developing your abilities using problem-based learning.  Reflective sessions are an opportunity to start making connections immediately and to apply the session activities to your own teaching situation.

XBL: Experiment-based learning

Date: Friday, January 11, 2019
Time: 1:00-2:30 p.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room 215

Facilitator: Adebanjo Oriade

Description:
This session will explore experiment-based learning that uses Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs).

xBL is used to refer to all of the variations of traditional problem-based learning. The x is a variable placeholder that represents project-based learning, case-based learning, design-based learning, studio-based learning, client-based learning, among other formats.

Maintaining institutional momentum for teaching transformation

Date: Friday, January 11, 2019
Time: 11:00-:11:30 a.m.
Location: Harker ISE Lab, room TBA

Facilitators: George Watson

Description:
Former Dean George Watson has been a leader of efforts to transform undergraduate instruction at the University of Delaware since the early 1990s. He will speak about the challenges of maintaining momentum within classes and schools that hope to replace passive listening with active learning on the part of students.