Stephanie L. Kerschbaum

Stephanie L. Kerschbaum is an associate professor of English at the University of Delaware. Her first book, TOWARD A NEW RHETORIC OF DIFFERENCE, offers a theory of marking difference to understand how difference circulates and is taken up in everyday conversations and interactions. This theory is important for writing teachers and researchers who are interested in understanding how mundane, everyday interactions are consequential for broader cultural and instiutional change. After its publication, it was awarded the “Advancement of Knowledge Award” from the Conference on College Composition and Communication.

Her recent co-edited collection, NEGOTIATING DISABILITY: DISCLOSURE AND HIGHER EDUCATION, was published by the University of Michigan Press in 2017. A collaboration with Laura T. Eisenman and James M. Jones, this book grew out of the 2013 Disability Disclosure in/and Higher Education conference sponsored by UD’s Center for the Study of Diversity and held on the UD campus.

As a deaf academic, Stephanie frequently draws on her own experiences being the only signing deaf person in many of the environments she moves through to deepen her understanding of marking difference. At UD she regularly teaches courses in disability studies, writing studies, and rhetoric.

Since 2016 she has served as the faculty coordinator for the University of Delaware’s Faculty Achievement Program, which builds on UD’s Institutional Membership in the National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity to connect faculty with one another and cultivate a campus climate supportive of all kinds of faculty work.

She is currently writing a book about the ways that disability is noticed and taken up within higher education environments, focusing on narratives written and shared by disabled faculty members.

Contact

Readers may contact her via email at kersch at udel dot edu. Her twitter handle is @slkersch.

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