Tag: mental health

“New Starts, New Semesters, New Year’s Resolutions” by Alex Stone

Being on campus again feels like I have been transported back to my freshman year. Everything feels brand new. Just walking around campus, I find myself looking at a map to be sure that I know how to get to my Women and Gender Studies class in Gore Hall. And, just the other day, I had to have my roommates remind me that the Scrounge in Perkins is called the Den. I am learning to adjust to life on campus all over again, but this time, I am not the same person as I was freshman year. I am looking at this semester as a fresh start and a second attempt at my freshman year. It is all about new beginnings and new experiences, and with new beginnings, come new resolutions; this school year, I have decided to make a New Year’s resolution: I want to journal more. Continue reading

“this is me trying” by Alex Stone

This past year has been very isolating, physically as well as emotionally. I remember how much in disbelief I was when we got the email last spring saying that we had to go home and take classes online for the rest of the semester. I honestly believed that by the summer, life would be back to normal. I believed that I would be returning to campus in the fall and seeing my friends very soon. I did not picture spending many long months in quarantine, isolated from everyone. I did not imagine the toll this would take on my mental health. I did not expect to feel so anxious, lonely, and fearful of the future. But something else I didn’t expect was to be listening to three new albums by Taylor Swift. This past year, Taylor Swift released the albums folklore and evermore, and just recently, her 2008 album, Fearless, but rebranded to Fearless (Taylor’s Version). I do not know if it was fate or some higher power that knew I needed these albums when I did, but every single one was released right when I needed her music the most. Continue reading

A Healthy Mindset during Social Distancing by Lorraine Capenos

I’m sure no one planned to experience a global pandemic during their college experience, and I’m no exception. Especially since it’s my last semester here at UD, social distancing has really thrown a wrench in my senior plans, and sometimes maintaining a positive and healthy mindset can be challenging. It can be easy to sink into disheartening thoughts about the state of the world and the unfortunate fact that I’m going to miss out on some experiences I was really looking forward to. When these thoughts and feelings come up, I take my time to feel them out and process them, understanding that my emotions and experiences are valid. That being said, I try not to dwell on them and remember to keep things in perspective. I choose to practice gratitude, taking time to appreciate the blessings I have in my life, and acknowledging that this is difficult for everyone but that I am safe and healthy, which is a privilege in itself. I believe it is important to find a balance, accepting and processing your feelings, while still maintaining perspective and gratitude.

I have also chosen to practice patience and forgiveness with myself, when I am low-energy or when I am not as optimistic or productive as I want to be. This is an unprecedented time period that most of us weren’t prepared for in the slightest. It is difficult to adjust your life on that large of a scale. Human beings are social creatures, so it is normal to feel a little blue when you can’t socialize with your friends in person for months. Add to that the monotony of quarantine and losing out on senior activities, and it’s understandable that I have had little motivation lately. So, I am being patient and flexible with myself, since being harsh on myself would likely get me nowhere and just make me feel worse. Instead, I am taking things slowly and allowing myself the time I need to process things, even when I am not being “productive” according to certain standards. Continue reading

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