Category: Archive (page 2 of 7)

Stories from further back in the Honors blog history

Guest Post: My Little E(tip)phany, by Yasmin Mann

The gym was full of people; athletes warming up for their matches and talking strategy, referees inspecting the courts for the first round of games, and audience members taking their places along the walls. My teammates and I were huddled together, stretching. I was trying to get myself in the zone and ready to go. Our referees indicated it was time to start and we took our places. My heart was pumping and adrenaline was rushing. I was so ready to start off the intramural volleyball season with a win.

Okay, so in reality, stakes probably weren’t as high as I hyped them up to be. Continue reading

Guest Post: A World Scholar in Madrid

Hailey Zirkle, Honors Program ’20

Four continents, eleven countries, seventeen states. I am eighteen years old, and I have covered 4.5 percent of planet Earth in my travels. Just over two months ago I left my home state of Delaware to embark on one of the biggest moments of not only my travel career, but also of my life.

My name is Hailey Zirkle. I was born in South Carolina but moved north to Delaware during my childhood. At the age of fourteen I began working my first job at Amore Pizza, followed soon after with another job at Limestone Vet Hospital. Graduating from Conrad High School in June 2016, I made the brave decision to begin my college experience at the University of Delaware in another country: Spain.

Here are some cultural differences I noted within the first few hours of being in Spain. Continue reading

Guest Post: Hailey Zirkle in Madrid

Four continents, eleven countries, seventeen states. I am eighteen years old, and I have covered 4.5 percent of planet Earth in my travels. Just over two months ago I left my home state of Delaware to embark on one of the biggest moments of not only my travel career, but also of my life.

My name is Hailey Zirkle. I was born in South Carolina but moved north to Delaware during my childhood. At the age of fourteen I began working my first job at Amore Pizza, followed soon after with another job at Limestone Vet Hospital. Graduating from Conrad High School in June 2016, I made the brave decision to begin my college experience at the University of Delaware in another country: Spain.

Here are some cultural differences I noted within the first few hours of being in Spain.

  1. Walking is the main form of transportation. For this reason, the sky in Spain is the bluest I’ve ever seen.
  2. Printer paper is longer than at home. (8.5×12 vs 8.5×11)
  3. Everyone eats later. Natives don’t even think about dinner until 21:30.
  4. People stay out until 06:00. Every night.
  5. During conversations it is normal for natives to stand very close to one another.

And yet I find myself, in the midst of all of these cultural differences, loving every moment. Within the first week I realized just how much new there was surrounding me that it was easy to feel lost but also at home at the same time. As one could guess, travel is my favorite activity. Spain itself is incredible in that there are mountains, beaches, forests, and deserts all within a one hour flight of each other. So here’s the part where I tell you about the new that has been discovered, and the new that still remains.


 

Week 1-5: Spain Sightseeing

Monasterio de Piedra – Upon arrival to the Monastery I was left speechless. Upon departure, I was left with three words: waterfalls and vegetation. The monastery itself was used by Buddhist monks and built in the Romanesque period. In 1835, the monastery was confiscated by the Mendizabal decree and the monks were forced out.

How to Watch the Sunset by Gillian Zucker

Every day, we travel to another world where we can do anything and be anything we want to be. We are scientists researching cures to deadly diseases. We are pilots, flying high-speed planes to tropical destinations. We are authors or artists, receiving praise for our masterpieces. If I told you that this alternate universe existed within your reach, would you believe me? With the help of the services and apps that our phones, laptops, or tablets grant us nowadays, we can do anything and be anything we want to be. But are we losing something in the process?

Continue reading

Why I Dance by Gillian Zucker

Sadly, everyone has been affected by cancer in some form. From the day I understood what this horrible disease was, I decided that I would fight it once and for all. So, I participated in the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life event in my community, later becoming its Activities Co-Chair and Event Lead. In these roles, I put on a successful event that celebrated cancer survivors, remembered the loved ones we have lost, and fought back against the disease, while funding cancer research. Naturally, I wanted to continue my involvement in the fight against cancer at UD, but I wasn’t sure where to start.

Now, let me tell you something about myself. Everyone who knows me and ever sees me in any sort of celebratory setting (proms, weddings, even in musicals) says that I’m a really bad dancer. I’ll admit, this is pretty true. And while bad-dancing is exhilarating, my skills – and stamina – typically quit after a simple “Cotton Eye Joe.” As you can imagine, when I first heard about UDance, the University of Delaware’s 12-hour dance marathon, I was very excited but also a bit overwhelmed. To me, a three-hour-long school dance where I was fist pumping and jumping to Kris Kross’s “Jump” seemed like a lot of time and a lot of energy. For weeks, I wondered: “How do the dancers and moralers at UDance keep up their energy for 12 hours straight? Why do they dance?”

Soon enough, the answer came to me. In the fall, Joe McDonough was invited to Redding Hall to tell the residents his story. I could feel the tears falling from my face as he spoke about the passing of his son, Andrew, after his battle with leukemia in 2007. In order to honor Andrew’s life and help other kids (our “B+ Heroes) who are battling childhood cancer, McDonough started the Andrew McDonough B+ Foundation. The money raised at UDance helps the B+ Foundation directly support the families of our heroes and fund pediatric cancer research. In this moment, I had an epiphany. I thought back to my own experience helping fight cancer with the Relay for Life. I signed up to get involved in UDance immediately.

When we raised $1,701,667.81 on March 13th, when we proudly displayed our “B+ Foundation” gear all year on campus, and when we pledged to be dancers or moralers at the event, we were not doing any of it for the pictures or primarily for our own enjoyment. We did it all FTK (For The Kids) so that one day cancer in every form will be a myth of the past. Oftentimes, when we are busy with our own lives, we forget just how much of an impact we can have on others. But we need to remember that when we are involved in UDance all year, we are making a difference and saving lives. And that is exactly why I dance: for a smile, for a life, for a cure.

Older posts Newer posts

© 2022

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Skip to toolbar