Author: Amanda (page 2 of 11)

“Top Four Tips for Finding a Job After College” by Avery Beer

“What are you doing after graduation?”

This question seems to be asked at least once a day, and I am sure to all my fellow graduating class members, you know exactly what I mean. These last few years have given me so much here at Delaware; but what I can tell you is that there are just some things that you cannot learn in a classroom. Yes, you guessed it. I’m talking about the complex, competitive, seemingly never-ending job search. I have had quite a few internships, and I am currently in the job search process now. It is not easy by any means, but having experience with the internship search has taught me a bit about what it takes. I have become a sort of “connoisseur” in this area, so I have decided to compile a list for all of you Blue Hens reading this who may also be looking for a job. Once your résumé is polished, check out these top four tips for landing a job post-graduation.

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“UDaB and Me” by Erin Jackson

A huge number of people on this campus participate in service, and an impressively large group go on alternative break programs. It simply blows my mind how many people are not only willing – but unbelievably enthusiastic – to dedicate the one week they have off during an otherwise non-stop semester to go on one of these programs. Nothing about this process is easy—socially, financially, emotionally, physically, or mentally. When you sign up to spend a week of your life with near strangers somewhere you’ve never been before, meeting people or experiences you’ve never encountered before, you’re not just stepping out of your comfort zone—you’re leaping into a whole new realm of unknown that cannot compare to anything you’ve done before. I’m sure everyone knows someone who has done an alternative break and come back physically incapable of talking about anything else. However, since my program left the day after Christmas and came back just at the start of winter session, I missed my chance to go off about what an amazing program it was—and that’s actually not what I want to talk about here. I want to talk about the people who made this program what it was. Continue reading

“Connection” by Avery Beer

From the day we are born until the day we die, the power of human connection is a force stronger than anything. As we grow up, a lot of us forget that it is 100% okay to still need to feel that. Babies cry because they need to be touched, loved, nurtured and attended to. That never really goes away. Just as our basic needs of food, water, air, and shelter stay constant, so does our need for each other. Not only does our psychological survival depend on human connection, but our physical survival as well.

Feeling connected to another person can be so powerful, whether it is through friendship, love, or blood. Picture a yin-yang: we are all balancing each other out but have a little bit of ourselves in the other person. I believe that sometimes, we just meet people that understand our souls. It just works. We are wired to connect. Think about the complexity of interconnection amongst people who can simply be present for each other. Whether it is an outcome of a dyadic interaction or a larger group interaction, human connection is one of the purest forms of brilliance. If we erase the material belongings of life, we would be more than okay as long as we had each other. Somewhere as people get older, our ego gets in the way without us really knowing it, and we sometimes fall into accepting the idea that we can do it all alone. We want to do everything ourselves: we want to feel needed but not do the needing. Life really is not made for that. Life is made for connectedness. Continue reading

“Presentation Tips” by Ryan Dean

In most college courses, classes consist of lectures, note-taking, and group assignments. But every so often students are required to demonstrate their knowledge publicly, in the form of an oral presentation. These occur so infrequently that many are unfamiliar with the strategies necessary to put on an engaging and informational presentation, or are out of practice with the behaviors of a skilled presenter. Fortunately, my high school afforded me plenty of opportunities to sharpen my proficiency in this vocation, and in this blog post I would like to share some of the techniques I have learned both through experience and mentorship.

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“Start Moving This Semester!” by Jenny Gloyd

For me, this semester is strikingly similar to the last. I am excited to continue living in Redding, to travel up to the same beautiful corner of campus every week to sing in my choir, and to dive back into some general chemistry—I strangely missed the challenge of it! Despite the comparability between my two semesters at the University of Delaware, there has still been an adjustment period this time around. This is the time to ask myself, “Do I want to approach this semester the same way as the last?” My personal answer to this question is that surrendering to the same routine would be outright boring. Among tweaked study habits, new involvement in clubs, and other little improvements, the best decision I have made this semester is to START MOVING!

I have decided to stay active this semester. I was on the cross country team all four years of high school and loved it, so why not start running here at UD? As of now, almost every day of the week I lace up my sneakers and head out on a running trail—my favorite so far has been running on the trails on North Campus. Continue reading

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