186 South College

grab your coffee, sit back and hang out with the UD Honors Program for a while

Author: Amanda (page 1 of 9)

“Presentation Tips” by Ryan Dean

In most college courses, classes consist of lectures, note-taking, and group assignments. But every so often students are required to demonstrate their knowledge publicly, in the form of an oral presentation. These occur so infrequently that many are unfamiliar with the strategies necessary to put on an engaging and informational presentation, or are out of practice with the behaviors of a skilled presenter. Fortunately, my high school afforded me plenty of opportunities to sharpen my proficiency in this vocation, and in this blog post I would like to share some of the techniques I have learned both through experience and mentorship.

 

PRESENTATION SKILLS

Regardless of the topic of a given demonstration, the behavior of the presenter is critical to promoting audience attention and comprehension. I’m sure you’ve heard some of these tactics before, but warrants restating that eye contact, posture, and gesticulation are all great tools to maintain viewers’ engagement. Try segmenting the crowd into 3 groups (or more, depending on the size of the venue) and make eye contact with individuals in each of those sections successively. Focusing too long on those closest to you could alienate other parts of your viewership. Likewise, good posture goes a long way in portraying an aura of confidence, indicating to your audience that you are competent in whatever is being discussed. Hand gestures are also useful in exhibiting your passion for the subject matter, increasing your credibility.

 

PRESENTATION TOOLS

Your skills as a presenter won’t mean much unless you have intriguing, comprehensible graphics for your audience to look at. In a PowerPoint presentation, slides are complimentary to your own speech. That means they should be brief, simple, and visually appealing. A good rule of thumb is to keep the text under 25 words, as this prevents the audience from becoming overwhelmed or tuning out to your verbal presentation. I have personally had the most success with animated bullet points, as these allow you to decide when your viewers see a piece of information, and in what order. Of course, you can always rely on a picture or graphic to liven up a slide, but be careful that it isn’t offering new information, and is cropped appropriately.

In those courses when droves of students are giving presentations, it is especially necessary to use unique slideshow templates. The default templates available on Google Slides and Microsoft PowerPoint are likely to be used by other students, so I recommend using a website like SlidesCarnival to download a free and visually pleasing template that will stand out from those of your peers.

 

The strategies I have outlined in this blog post are by no means intended to be exhaustive, nor could they be. The circumstances surrounding a demonstration, like the locale, audience, and topic will influence the creative decisions that go into crafting a presentation. For instance, slideshows are best suited for small, indoor environments; while charts and graphs are practically essential when presenting the results of an experiment or study. However, the techniques stated above will be a boon to any presentation, since audience engagement and comprehension are at the center of public speaking.

 

Link to SlidesCarnival: https://www.slidescarnival.com/

 

“Start Moving This Semester!” by Jenny Gloyd

For me, this semester is strikingly similar to the last. I am excited to continue living in Redding, to travel up to the same beautiful corner of campus every week to sing in my choir, and to dive back into some general chemistry—I strangely missed the challenge of it! Despite the comparability between my two semesters at the University of Delaware, there has still been an adjustment period this time around. This is the time to ask myself, “Do I want to approach this semester the same way as the last?” My personal answer to this question is that surrendering to the same routine would be outright boring. Among tweaked study habits, new involvement in clubs, and other little improvements, the best decision I have made this semester is to START MOVING!

I have decided to stay active this semester. I was on the cross country team all four years of high school and loved it, so why not start running here at UD? As of now, almost every day of the week I lace up my sneakers and head out on a running trail—my favorite so far has been running on the trails on North Campus. Continue reading

“What I Gained from Studying Abroad for a Semester” by Hayley Whiting

When I graduate and look back at my time at UD, I know that studying abroad will be one of the best experiences I will take away from my four years as an undergraduate. My experience offered a completely unique opportunity to not only explore a new place but also to get to know myself. Here is what I gained from studying abroad in Paris for a semester!

First and foremost, my semester abroad strengthened me as individual. Before my trip, I had to go through the extensive visa process by following all of the steps and gathering all the needed documents, so, with determination, I was able to successfully complete the process on my own. Also, although I have flown with my family before, I flew on my own for the first time going to Paris, and then three more times for my fall break in Italy and my trip back to the U.S. It was rewarding knowing I could navigate the airport process by myself instead of relying on someone else! I also learned how to get around the city on my own. Once I got to Paris, it took me a few tries, but I quickly was able to figure out the metro system and was soon jumping on and off, making transfers, and following the signs in the underground passageways without a problem (but with the help of Google Maps, which is not only useful for metro routes but also for walking directions). I also really appreciated having my own unique experience exploring the city. I enjoyed many days jumping on the metro and choosing from the enormous selection of sights to see in Paris. I also decided to write in a journal consistently while I was there, which I have never done before, so it was nice to reflect on my day-to-day experiences and record my thoughts. Continue reading

“Artes Vita: Touching Up Your Work Flow” By Abhigna Rao

HI EVERYONE! WELCOME BACK! I hope everyone had a lovely, restful Winter Break, whether you were taking a Winter Session, chilling at home, away on vacation, or studying abroad!

But now it’s back to the grind, and I can’t be the only one who’s feeling a tad bit overwhelmed with the impending hustle of the next twelve weeks. It’s only been three weeks into the spring semester, and I already feel like the rustic bricks of Old College are being thrown at me.

Nevertheless, how we handle the pressure of achieving a healthy work-life balance is fully within our control—if we develop the right mindset to do so. One of my objectives for personal growth this semester is to really work hard to stay on top of my academics and activities, and I want to share with you some of the strategies I have been using in order to do just that. Continue reading

“Completing my English Degree” by Amanda Langell

As the semester comes to a close, I find myself in a nostalgic, uncharacteristic mood.  Four years ago, I was just trying to survive my first finals week as a stressed-out, overwhelmed freshman. It sounds cliché, but I have no idea how time has moved so quickly, and now I’m concluding my last ever fall semester as an undergraduate. My best friend and I met for lunch today and we couldn’t believe how much we have grown since we met on move-in day at Redding. It feels like a lifetime ago, yet it also feels like yesterday. I have a feeling a lot of clichés will be thrown out in this post, but I can’t help it.

I came into college declared as an English major, not knowing much beyond my passion for reading and writing. Despite some looming doubts and outside voices, I trusted I would figure out my path eventually. Over the past years, I took literature classes that excited me, creative writing classes that bettered me, and English classes that just sounded fun. I became a member of the Writing Fellows Program, a writer (and now editor) for this blog, and an editor of Caesura, the campus literary magazine. I also added history as a second major and worked extremely hard to balance two of the most writing-centric subjects offered at the university. Sometimes it was a lot, but I made it out alive. I successfully increased my passions through my education and will leave UD this upcoming spring as a better student and a better person. Continue reading

Older posts

© 2019 186 South College

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Subscribe By Email

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.

Please prove that you are not a robot.

Skip to toolbar