“Have A Plan and Believe In It” by Shrinidhi Dandibhotla

Hi guys! It’s me again, Shrinidhi. I wanted to share some tips and tricks that have helped me to be successful in my classes this semester, as well as things that I do to make sure I can accomplish all the different goals that I have set for myself.

We are all currently in a situation where we are being forced to adapt and adjust our previous ways of life. The time we once spent going out with family and friends has now turned into virtual Zoom meetings. And as frustrating or annoying as it may be, this is very likely to be our new way of life. So, rather than exhausting my mental energy feeling bad about what I don’t have control over, I’ve decided to start looking at the brighter side of things.  Continue reading

“The Philosophy of More Cowbell” by Nadya Ellerhorst

I was warned multiple times before starting college to not make too many commitments so as to make the transition from high school to university life easier. I took the message to heart, reminding myself the importance of saying “no” throughout the summer. 

Next thing I knew, fall semester arrived, and I basically forgot everything.

Currently, I am a reporter for The Review; participate in QUEST, Blue Hen Leadership Program, and Delaware Diplomats; work an internship; and pursue an Honors course load in order to fulfill credits for 2 majors and a minor.

Oh yeah, and I write for 186 South College.

Some might say I’m doing too much, even amid the present digital circumstances. Perhaps I would be, if I didn’t subscribe to the philosophy of “More Cowbell.”

For the select percentage of readers who have no clue as to the reference I’m making (i.e., if “More Cowbell” doesn’t ring a bell), there exists an SNL gem featuring the legendary likes of Will Ferrell and Christopher Walken that centers on (you guessed it) the emperor of percussion— nay, all—instruments: the almighty cowbell.

In it, Blue Öyster Cult records “Don’t Fear the Reaper” (on the off chance you haven’t heard this song before, kindly climb out from that rock you’ve been living under and give it a listen. Now.) What ensues are multiple debates as to the degree of cowbell the song necessitates.  Continue reading

“Nostalgia” by Alaka Deshpande

“I wish there was a way to know you’re in the good old days before you’ve actually left them,” goes the quote by Andy Bernard from The Office, a quote that seems to resonate with everyone. Nostalgia is such a powerful feeling: we all reflect on and relive the happiest moments of our past in our minds. We evoke a warm, happy feeling with just a hint of sadness while we yearn to be back in that moment, knowing that it has passed.

Nostalgia is especially powerful under our current circumstances, when life looks much different than it used to before. It feels like our lives have been stripped away of so many things that they used to be full of: the busy and bustling long days on campus full of classes and club meetings, dining hall dinners, and late nights with friends. These have all been reduced down to long days alone in my room, taking Zoom classes from my bed.  Continue reading

Staying Politically Engaged after the Election by Clara Kinken

If you’re like me, this lengthy campaign season and prolonged election cycle has seriously taken its toll. While political burnout might seem easier to succumb to than it has in the past, this year has also helped many of us realize political and civic engagement can be more rewarding than we previously imagined. With the 2020 election displaying record voter turnout, particularly among young voters, students may feel inspired to continue their political engagement. 

Staying involved in civic processes is not a one-size-fits-all. There are a vast number of ways students can remain engaged outside of voting, from formal classroom education to extracurricular peer-led discussions. In recent years, including this one, the University of Delaware has been named a top school for the Student Voting Honor Roll, which not only demonstrates that our student body remains civically engaged, but also indicates that there are a number of on-campus offerings that foster a supportive environment for political awareness. 

While the 2020 presidential election may be over, there are still plenty of other opportunities for students to get involved with politics outside of casting ballots. If you feel civic engagement has been a transformative experience for you and would like to spend time encouraging fellow students to join in the democratic process, then you should check out Make It Count. If you’re interested in finding ways to have safe and productive political discussions or to learn more about political issues, Let’s Talk is another RSO to try. Both of these RSOs are non-partisan, but more ideology-specific RSOs are available as well, including the College Democrats and College Republicans, among others.  Continue reading

“How To: Start Your Own Podcast” by Abhigna Rao

I’m just going to say it: podcasts are the greatest digital media development since sliced bread! Okay, okay, that’s a matter of opinion–and sliced bread isn’t digital media. That being said, the realm of podcasting has been rising in popularity over the last several years, and whether your interests lie in politics, literature, mental health,  sports, current affairs, chat shows, or anything in between, you have likely given an episode a try on Spotify, Audible, or another streaming platform. Maybe you’re an avid podcast listener already, or maybe you’re still looking for just the right one to jump into–or perhaps, you’re even considering starting your own.

Well, guess what? I had the coolest opportunity to have a hand in starting up a podcast just a few months ago (more on that later!), and for anyone who has been thinking about doing the same for a while or just looking to pick up a new hobby over the upcoming breaks, here are my tips on how to get started. Continue reading

« Older posts

© 2021

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Skip to toolbar