“Learning to Ask for Help” by Alex Stone

My first in-person, spring semester is already over, and I am still learning, or more like re-learning, how to navigate a college life that is not behind a computer screen. For so long, college consisted of sitting in my childhood bedroom, attending classes online, and having my dogs as my only study partners. It felt like I was very much on my own. Even with all the opportunities that UD had to offer online over the pandemic, it just did not feel the same as in-person school. I felt like I had to navigate this confusing time on my own, and as a pre-med student, that seemed so daunting.  Continue reading

“On Doing Things Alone” by Nadya Ellerhorst

As we approach the spring semester’s grand finale, with final RSO meetings and bouncy house-laden end-of-the-year events,  it’s really hard to feel alone, especially with everyone having the shared experiences of preparing for finals while trying to conclude things on a fun note.

I definitely consider myself the type of person who actively tries to make time to go to as many events on campus as possible throughout the year. Doing so is a great way to take a break from academics and to have memorable, enriching, potentially eye-opening experiences, be it at a theater performance or a guest lecture. I’d be lying if I said that I didn’t appreciate the occasional freebie, either. Sometimes, however, attending such events solo can prove to be a challenge. 

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“Crippling Ambition” by Shayna Demick

gripping your throat, your joints, tissue, your fingers and toes, submerged in your blood stream, strangling your woes, 

ambition has taken command of your being. 

ambition drives some to make strides, defy the odds and establish themselves. 

but for me, my ambition suffocates me and collapses on top of me before I even vacate my starting position. 

I have crippling ambition.

I want everything I can’t have. 

I feel it so strongly that it makes me weak.

I’m feeble and fearful. 

failure taunts me everywhere I look. 

I want my dreams too badly that I am paralyzed by my ambition.  Continue reading

“A Word of Advice” by Brittany Connely

Time has flown by fast. It seems like just yesterday that I was a freshman from across the country, eager to grow up and have new experiences. Never would I have guessed back then that I would become the person I am today and meet people that I cannot imagine my life without. Many of my posts this past year have been me reminiscing about what used to be and what could have been while trying to make the most of each day. With this being my last post for 186 South College, I wasn’t sure how to wrap up all of my experiences into one short blog post. If I were to write a post about everything that has happened since I first came to UD, it would be the size of a book. So, instead of that, I want to give one piece of advice to current graduates, future graduates, and anyone else who needs it.

It’s okay to not know what you are doing. Continue reading

“Nearing the Summit” by Felicia Seybold

Back when times were simpler, I used to plop down on the couch with my Nintendo DS and my troubles would melt away as I became completely absorbed in catching Pokémon or destroying zombies with my botanic army. I had a tiny world in the palm of my hands, filled to the brim with memorable characters, dazzling worlds, and soundtracks that pull on my heartstrings to this day. Some time last year, I decided to buy a Nintendo Switch Lite for myself in an effort to replicate the simple joy I had as a child while playing DS games. I had acquired my Switch Lite at a time where I was at the end of my rope trying to survive a global pandemic and go through college online. Social media was no longer cutting it as an escape route; too often it bombarded me with the endless deluge of tragedy occurring every day, tiring me further when I needed rest. So, I decided to take a cue from my childhood, and once again plop down on the couch with a cozy video game rather than scroll mindlessly through my phone. Though I was turning to video games to forget my troubles, I could find myself relating to the struggles that my video game characters had to go through, and in some ways it helped me to cope with my own while in college. Out of all of the games that I have played, none has showcased this more than the game Celeste.

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