Courses offered by Concentration Faculty this Semester

Vertical evacuation shelter - Rikuzen-Takata, Japan June 2011.

Vertical evacuation shelter – RikuzenTakata, Japan June 2011

Interested in what courses are being offered? Here are just a few of the required or related courses offered in Fall 2016. Of course, many other classes in sociology, criminal justice, and other departments are offered that would be of interest and value to those students interested in the concentration. Speak to an advisor for more information.

 

Courses offered in Fall 2016

SOCI 324/CRJU325 Issues in Emergency Management

Overview of the development of emergency management in the United States, including the formation of the profession, integration of formal and informal organizations, crisis response, and perceptions of crime and deviance during emergencies. No prerequisites.

Justin Kates - Class of 2010 - serves as Director of Emergency Management for the City of Nashua, NH and adjunct professor at Daniel Webster College teaching crisis management: "The concentration helped acquaint me with concepts like "resilience" before they were buzzwords in the emergency management realm. Having that edge helped me to innovate this field and build a much more comprehensive program here [in Nassau]."

Justin Kates – Class of 2010; Director of Emergency Management for Nashua, NH; adjunct professor at Daniel Webster College teaching crisis management: “The concentration helped acquaint me with concepts like “resilience” before they were buzzwords in the emergency management realm. Having that edge helped me to innovate this field and build a much more comprehensive program here [in Nassau].”

SOCI 367 Seminar: Sociology of 9/11

In consideration of the 15th anniversary of the 9/11/2001 attacks, this course will focus on the social responses during and implications of 9/11. No prerequisites.

SOCI 322/CRJU 322 Crowds, Cults and Revolutions

Analysis of forms of behavior in relatively unstructured situations such as crowds, panics, riots and demonstrations; and processes of interaction: susceptibility, contagion, polarization and communication. Prerequisite: SOCI201

SOCI 471 Disaster, Vulnerability and Development

Introduces students to social vulnerability analysis of disaster. Students examine how social, geographical, and cultural factors as well as patterns of development put people differentially at risk to disasters. Emphasizes the intersection of gender, race, class, age, and ability. Disasters in the US are compared and contrasted to international disasters. Students will explore how vulnerable social groups are affected by and cope with hazardous conditions and events, as well as study the capacities of these groups to increase resiliency. Readings draw from disaster studies, feminist studies, and development studies.

SOCI 355 Environment and Health

Couched in the sociological perspectives of Embodied Health Social Movements (EHM), popular epidemiology, and environmental justice, this course examines how sociologists are studying human health and health disparities as a result of disproportionate exposure to environmental burdens.

 

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