302-831-2141

Resources

Why might individual or group therapy be recommended to a student?

Individuals seek counseling for many reasons, ranging from a wish to solve a long-standing problem to a desire to enhance their personal growth. To address the personal, educational and career concerns of the students, the CCSD offers a variety of services. Students come in to discuss issues such as: roommate conflicts, anxiety and stress management, depression, eating disorders, career choices, and family concerns such as divorce and alcoholism. Students may also receive psychiatric services if medication is considered essential to the treatment of their concerns.

Here are some of the common instances when counseling might be recommended to a student:

  • Fundamental or traumatic changes in personal relationships: death of a family member or friend, divorce or separation in the family, pregnancy, etc.
  • Significant changes in mood or behavior: withdrawal from others, asocial activity (e.g., lying, stealing) spells of unexplained crying or outbursts of anger, or unusual agitation.
  • References to suicide: since it is difficult to distinguish between serious threats or passing idle thoughts of suicide, judgment about the seriousness of a situation is best made in consultation with a psychologist or psychiatrist.
  • Anxiety and depression: these are two of the more common symptoms which can significantly impair a student’s functioning.
  • Psychosomatic symptoms: concerns such as tension headaches, loss of appetite or excessive eating, insomnia or excessive sleeping or chronic stomach distress, etc.
  • Alcohol and drug abuse: evidence of excessive drinking, drug abuse or drug dependence is almost always indicative of psychological problems.
  • Social justice or discrimination concerns: challenges related to sense of belonging, differential treatment, feeling invalidated, feeling unsafe physically or emotionally, or experiencing or witnessing hostility directed toward oneself or others.
  • Career choice concerns: often these concerns reflect the student’s struggle to understand themselves and the world of work. Sometimes it reflects a problem with decision-making in general.
  • Concern about academics: such as contemplating dropping out of school, worrying about possible academic failure, or considering a transfer to another school.

Emergency Assistance

If you perceive an immediate danger or risk of suicide, call 911 for immediate assistance.

CCSD has daily emergency walk-in availability during business hours. Students can also reach mental health support 24 hours a day on the UD Helpline or the Crisis Text Line.

Contact CCSD

Worried about a student?

Resources for Faculty and Staff

What is my role?

Approximately one in four University of Delaware students in every graduating class have used services provided through our center. Students experience significant life changes when they come to college, and those who hold an identity that is underrepresented (such as returning adult students, members of a minority group, veterans, students with disabilities and so on) are even more likely to experience unique difficulties making this transition. Causes of stress are often interrelated and may result in a student turning to anyone who is perceived as knowledgeable, caring, and trustworthy. CCSD welcomes student wellbeing concerns from all faculty and staff, and we encourage you to use this site as a resource to determine next steps.

Is consultation available?

The CCSD provides consultation services for students, staff, professionals, and faculty. These consultations often focus on a concern for an individual, behavioral problems which occur in classrooms, or other issues that may have important psychological dimensions. Our clinical staff will attempt to respond to requests for consultation as soon as daily schedules permit. Please tell the receptionist if you think the situation is an emergency requiring immediate attention.

What happens after I refer a student?

All students eligible to pay the Student Health Fee are entitled to a thorough assessment and recommendation for counseling. All services provided by the CCSD are intended to provide short-term assistance to students in dealing with personal, career, and educational concerns which may be barriers to their academic progress.

After an initial assessment of a student’s concerns, the psychologists and/or psychiatrists will determine if an individual’s needs may best be met by the CCSD’s services or are beyond the scope of those services. In the latter cases, such individuals will receive a referral to other sources of assistance, on or off-campus. The CCSD does not provide forensic services that involve litigation or require court testimony.

Interviews conducted at the CCSD are confidential in nature. Information cannot be released except upon a student’s written request, in circumstances which would result in clear danger to the individual or others, or as may be required by law. The CCSD adheres very strictly to this policy.

If a faculty or staff member is interested in a student’s contact with the CCSD, information can best be obtained directly from the student. Students are not bound by the same promises of confidentiality that professional psychologists are obliged to keep.

In some instances, a student may want the CCSD to share certain information with a faculty or staff member, and can give CCSD a written authorization which specifies the purpose and the content of such a disclosure.

When and how do I refer a student to CCSD?

Not every student needs professional counseling. Sometimes simply listening and offering encouragement and empathy can help a student feel understood. If you want to let a student know that his or her concerns are normal and expected, be sure not to minimize the problems in doing so. What is a simple solution in your view may be harder to imagine for another person.

If distressing circumstances are affecting a student’s wellbeing or ability to make satisfactory academic progress, a referral for counseling may be in order. Referrals are usually indicated in the following situations:

  1. A student presents a problem or requests information which is outside your range of knowledge;
  2. You feel that personality differences which cannot be resolved between you and the student will interfere with your efforts to help the student;
  3. The problem is personal, and you know the student on other than a professional basis (friend, neighbor, relative, etc.); or
  4. A distressed student is reluctant to discuss a problem with you for some reason.

If you’ve determined that a student could benefit from professional counseling, speak with them in a direct, straightforward fashion in which concern for their welfare is shown, and make it clear that this suggestion represents your best judgment based on observations of their behavior. Specific feedback about behaviors of concern is recommended. Above all, it is not advisable to attempt to deceive or trick the student into seeking counseling.

Except in emergencies, the option must be left open for the student to accept or refuse counseling. If the student is skeptical or reluctant, simply express your acceptance of those feelings so that your own relationship with the student is not jeopardized. Give the student an opportunity to consider other alternatives by suggesting that they might need some time to think it over. If the student emphatically says “no,” then respect that decision, and again leave the situation open for possible reconsideration at a later time.

If the student agrees to the referral, they or you may call us at 302-831-2141 to make an appointment. In either case, the student’s first meeting with the CCSD will be an interview in which the student and the clinician make decisions about the type of help needed. Initial appointments are usually scheduled within a few days. Students requiring immediate help are seen on an emergency basis. You should follow up with the student at a later date to show your continued interest even if they did not accept your attempted referral.

What should I do in an emergency?

In emergency situations involving students who are unwilling or unable to seek help on their own, contact any of the following:

Center for Counseling & Student Development: 302-831-2141
UD Helpline 24/7/365: 302-831-1001
Crisis Text Line: Text “UDTEXT”, or "STEVE" for students of color, to 741741
Student Health Services: 302-831-2226
UD Police and/or Ambulance: 911

Resources for Family and Friends

What is my role as a parent or family member?

College is a time of great change, when students become more independent and learn how to manage their lives. For families, we know this transition can be filled with anticipation as well as anxiety, confusion and hope. We recommend that you support your student’s growth by:

  • providing a steady, supportive home base for your student;
  • recognizing that there will be ups and downs in a student’s needs and expectations;
  • following your student’s lead and encourage them to work through problems using you as a consultant;
  • helping your student balance their thoughts and emotions to make their best decisions;
  • noticing and appreciating the new skills your student develops; and
  • taking care of your own needs during what can be a stressful and confusing time.

Whether your student will be returning home for the holidays or commuting throughout the year to UD, consider how their new levels of responsibility and independence will be acknowledged in the home. If you’d like to talk through the situation you are experiencing, feel free to call CCSD at 302-831-2141.

What is my role as a friend?

You may find yourself concerned with the behavior, emotional concerns or demeanor of a friend. Many students talk with a counselor because they want some ideas about how to be helpful to another person. If a consultation meeting would be helpful to you, call CCSD for a phone consultation or appointment at 302-831-2141. We recommend that you support your friend by:

  • listening to and putting yourself in the shoes of the friend about whom you are concerned to help them feel understood and cared about;
  • being specific about your concerns and direct about your recommendations if you decide to address them;
  • recognizing that change often happens in stages, and your friend may not take your advice immediately; and
  • reaching out to CCSD or any of our emergency services if you feel that the situation is urgent.

What happens if my student or friend seeks counseling?

It is not unusual for a student to come to the University having already received counseling at home. Others may not have previous counseling experience but might have a difficult time in making the transition to college. If you are a family member who knows your student has a history of mental health problems or treatment, please check with us before school begins about what we can offer and what you may need to seek off-campus. Your continued support and involvement is often crucial to your student’s wellbeing. While the University aims to provide a supportive environment for students, it cannot replace the essential role of family.

All students eligible to pay the Student Health Fee are entitled to a thorough assessment and recommendation for counseling. All services provided by the CCSD are intended to provide short-term assistance to students in dealing with personal, career, and educational concerns which may be barriers to their academic progress.

After an initial assessment of a student’s concerns, the psychologists and/or psychiatrists will determine if an individual’s needs may best be met by the CCSD’s services or are beyond the scope of those services. In the latter cases, such individuals will receive a referral to other sources of assistance, on or off-campus. The CCSD does not provide forensic services that involve litigation or require court testimony.

Interviews conducted at the CCSD are confidential in nature. Information cannot be released except upon a student’s written request, when the student is a clear danger to self or others, or as may be required by law. The CCSD adheres very strictly to this policy.

What should I do in an emergency?

In emergency situations involving students who are unwilling or unable to seek help on their own, contact any of the following:

Center for Counseling & Student Development: 302-831-2141
UD Helpline 24/7/365: 302-831-1001
Crisis Text Line: Text “UDTEXT”, or "STEVE" for students of color, to 741741
Student Health Services: 302-831-2226
UD Police and/or Ambulance: 911

Resources for Self-Help

Resources for Underrepresented Students

Resources for Off-Campus Referral

Students’ first contact with the CCSD typically consists of a triage meeting. Our goal is to provide each student with continuity of care and an unbroken path of support, within a short-term model. A student may be referred off-campus if, in the clinician’s judgment, the student’s counseling requirements fall beyond the scope of the services offered by the CCSD. Our full-time Referral Coordinator is available to work with students and, if they choose, their families to find a local resource that will better serve their needs.

When you meet with the Referral Coordinator, your needs and preferences with regard to an outside therapist will be assessed. You’ll discuss topics such as whether or not you will be using insurance, whether you need to walk or would be willing to take public transportation, and how quickly you need an appointment. If you would like to include family members in the process, or to have insurance benefits explained, the Referral Coordinator can assist with those considerations as well.

Once a referral has been generated and/or an initial appointment with an outside therapist has been scheduled, the Referral Coordinator will follow up with you to ensure the match was a good one and to make sure all of your questions have been addressed. Through our robust referral program, the CCSD strives to address the needs of students presenting with mental health concerns, whether those needs are best served by one of our own clinicians or by an outside provider.

Other Off-Campus Provider Directories
Delaware Psychological Association
Psychology Today Therapist Directory
National Board for Certified Counselors

Local providers interested in becoming part of our local referral system may email our referral coordinator, Allison Banbury at abanbury@udel.edu. Existing providers may update their directory information through this form.