302-831-2141

Community Support

CCSD offers resources for coping and connection, including specific support for students impacted by current and ongoing events and those who have traditionally under-utilized our services.

The COVID-19 pandemic and nationwide reawakening to racial trauma has brought light to the injustices suffered by people of color in our communities. All of our staff have been trained in racial trauma, and we have been working to make our center more accessible and more equitable in our offerings, such as our culturally responsive services which include Student of Color and Rainbow Drop-In Hours. We also respond via our Community Support blog when we become aware of community or global events that impact our students’ mental health, and we always welcome suggestions for improvement at 302-831-2141 or studentwellbeing@udel.edu.

Emergency Assistance

If you perceive an immediate danger or risk of suicide, call 911 for immediate assistance.

Students can also reach mental health support 24 hours a day on the UD Helpline or the Crisis Text Line.

Worried about a student?

At CCSD, we see you and we hear you

As we prepare to enter the third year of an unexpected pandemic, it is no secret that health providers (especially mental health, and especially in higher education) are feeling the strain. COVID-19 upended much of what we knew about life — how our jobs worked, what was expected of us professionally and personally, how to navigate relationships, and so on. This upheaval happened in the midst of a nationwide mental health crisis, when more people and especially more college aged individuals were presenting higher levels of anxiety and other support needs than in decades past. This upheaval also happened in the latest era of societal awakening to racial inequities, bringing agony not only for what happens, but for the absence of systemic changes that are so desperately overdue. And it happened in the middle of a polarized political landscape, in which so many have lost sight of a middle ground toward a better tomorrow.

The pandemic has been, for me, a professional and personal tipping point.

As the most recent director of UD’s Center for Counseling and Student Development, I saw firsthand how these experiences weighed heavily on all of you –– students, faculty and staff alike –– and deeply impacted our day-to-day lives in ways we never imagined possible. The culmination of what I experienced, professionally as well as personally, led me to realize that I must reprioritize key aspects of my life, including my family and career, and led me to step back from my position as director this past July 1.

Staying on as senior psychologist, I have appreciated doing more of the clinical work with students, supervision and student outreach that drew me to this field. I’ve been energized, despite the climate I just described, to continue my journey toward becoming a compassionate professional who is attuned and responsive to inequities in and around my environment. I’ve been proud to work alongside my colleagues in pursuing transformational collaboration in and outside of our counseling center that will allow us to better serve the needs of UD students now and into the future.

Among other achievements, this work has led to our move to the Wellbeing Center at Warner Hall, placing us one floor away from Student Wellness and one building over from Student Health. It has led to an expansion of therapy options for which no advance appointment is needed, such as daily crisis walk-in hours and protected drop-in hours for students of color, those who identify as LGBTQIAA+ and more. It has included a considerable lift to have all of our clinicians trained and resourced to provide telehealth care, as well as create capacity to hire more clinical staff.

In short, this work has resulted in more ways for our staff to clinically engage students, more ways to access services, and more equitable offerings than we have ever seen at the University of Delaware since CCSD’s creation in 1946.

To be clear, our work is not done. Sometimes it feels like we are using sandbags to stem a tsunami: providing support one bag at a time, only to be washed away by all that is beyond our reach. Our collective, growing understanding of mental health and all it affects is a positive development, but one that was straining our systems long before COVID-19 or George Floyd. Despite the odds, we continue to rework those physical, organizational, and theoretical structures that allow us to work smarter in serving student needs — but we do it amidst constant reminders that we aren’t able to work hard or fast enough.

The nature of confidential work precludes responding specifically to complaints, making campus counseling centers an easy target for dissatisfied students, their friends, and those whispering further down the lane. Some of these complaints are truthful. All of these complaints, whether sent privately or aired via public platforms such as Instagram, are taken seriously and investigated to the fullest extent of our abilities — which, when they are made anonymously, means copious hours of poring over clinical notes to determine where something may have been said or done. Indeed, it is those quick, general and anonymous comments that are so easy to make which are the most difficult for us to investigate and hold specific staff accountable for.

This investigative work is in addition to the assessment we undertake routinely, and the tens of thousands of (confidential) client reviews that the public never sees. The relationships we build with our clients, and community members through our work is what buoys us some days. For all the feedback, both positive and negative, there is only one thing I can say: thank you. I know that the effort to be heard stems from wanting the University’s mental health support network to be the best it can be. I know also that despite our mission to help all students feel welcomed and better prepared to succeed, this has clearly not been the case for all students.

As professional, licensed psychologists, psychiatrists, advanced nursing professionals, and counselors, we are responsible for our behavior and can be held accountable not only through the Division of Student Life* and the broader University**, but also through our professional licensing boards***.  I encourage anyone who has felt maligned by unethical behavior in any professional setting to report this behavior.

I share the disappointment, frustration and anger any time that I hear the center has fallen short, either of inspiring students to seek help or of meeting their expectations for support. Despite no longer serving in the director role, I remain committed as a senior psychologist to pursuing any and all changes that are needed for the center to best serve students’ mental health needs.

Embracing conflict rather than shying away from it is part of our calling as mental health professionals. As we continue to find professional (and personal) relief to keep doing this work, I hope that students will continue to guide our path forward as a center and provide specific, actionable feedback** on our progress. These past two years have been easy on no one and if we’re going to reach a better tomorrow, we’ll be doing it together. I look forward to it.

Brad Wolgast
Senior Psychologist
Center for Counseling and Student Development
Student Life: Wellbeing

We want to hear from you.
*Email your feedback to studentwellbeing@udel.edu, or submit anonymous feedback on the CCSD website.

**You can also submit an internal, anonymous complaint via UD’s EthicsPoint compliance hotline.

***Each state has licensing boards that are designed to review complaints about professional behavior.  All CCSD staff are governed by the legal and ethical guidelines of our profession and overseen by the Delaware Board of Examiners. You can report a healthcare provider online or call 302-744-4500 to speak to an investigator.

CCSD Social Justice Statement

I am pleased to announce that the Center for Counseling and Student Development has refined our values, goals, and direction, with specific aspirations regarding social justice. I’d like to thank the many staff members, students, and alumni who have been part of this work thus far, as well as provide you with the attached full statement on this topic as part of an invitation to hold us accountable for progress. We humbly put forward this statement as a reminder of our aspirations as well as our difficult history which inadvertently upheld oppression in many forms.

Our overarching goal remains to continually become more welcoming and effective care providers for all students. Through a better understanding of how student and staff identities, privilege, and oppression affect mental health and use of services, we will actively pursue an environment that honors authentic selves and advances equity at UD.

We recognize that our actions will speak louder than our words and invite you to stay informed about our progress as well as updates to this living document via our blog and the @LiveWellUDel Instagram channel. If you ever have suggestions, feel free to pass them along. We look forward to continuing our collaborative support of the whole UD student and thank you as always for your partnership.

Sincerely,
Brad Wolgast and the entire CCSD Team

 

Earthquake in Haiti

We at the CCSD join the world in mourning the unimaginable death toll from Saturday’s 7.2 magnitude earthquake in Haiti. In addition to the growing number of lives lost, tens of thousands of homes and businesses were destroyed or damaged, leaving far too many in desperate need of assistance. If you are a UD student who has been impacted by this event, please reach out to the counseling center at 302-831-2141 or the UD Helpline at 831-1001 (24/7).

Resources for resilience and self-care in times of crisis:
101 Ways to take care of yourself when the world feels overwhelming
Taking care of yourself

Additional UD Resources for Support:
UD’s Office for International Students and Scholars: (http://www1.udel.edu/oiss/)
Office of Dean of Students: (https://sites.udel.edu/deanofstudents/)

Ways to assist relief efforts in Haiti:

 

Support for Indian Diaspora

Since mid-March, India has been experiencing a devastating surge in Covid-19 cases and deaths. The immense grief and sadness has been further intensified by shortages in vaccines, hospital beds for critically ill individuals, necessary treatments such as oxygen tanks, and a lack of transparency regarding the current state of affairs in many state and union territories in India.

The CCSD extends our hearts out to the victims in India and their families. The realities of this crisis highlight the current privileges across the U.S. in the forms of decreasing social distancing requirements and increasing access to vaccines. For any students in the UD community who would like to speak with a counselor to receive support in processing and coping with experiences of trauma, grief, or other emotions, please contact us at 302-831-2141.

The UD Helpline is available 24/7/365 for phone support at 302-831-1001. Students of Color can also text STEVE to 741741 for a crisis counselor.

Students can also reach out to the office of Student Diversity and Inclusion, which has resources for Asian Pacific Islander and Desi American students.

Additional Mental Health Resources

 

Derek Chauvin Verdict

The CCSD expresses relief for the guilty verdicts in the murder trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin. This relief is mixed with deep sadness for the death of George Floyd, and the recognition that while this one officer has been held accountable in this one instance, we are still a long way from seeing justice for Black and Brown Americans, who continue to suffer and die as a result of police brutality and racial bias. That any of us were unsure of the outcome of this case is a testament to how much work remains to be done.

A Community Processing and Connection event, hosted by Dean of Students Adam Cantley, and Fatimah Conley, Interim Chief Diversity Officer will be held for students seeking a place to process the trial and verdict:

April 21, Wednesday 4:30-6:00PM 

https://udel.zoom.us/j/96489363509
Passcode: ComConnect 

In addition, we offer Student of Color Drop-in Hours:  Students of color can meet with staff of color without going through our triage process.  To access these appointments, call our main number and request one of these meetings.  You will be offered the first available open time.  Current hours are Mondays 10:00 A.M & 3:00 P.M., Tuesdays 10:00 A.M., Wednesdays 2:00 P.M., and Thursdays 11:00 A.M & 2:00 P.M.

We also encourage students to attend the April 22 “Seeds of Change” presentation Seeds of Change Speaker Series: “What Does ‘Defund the Police’ Mean? A Real Conversation.”

Join Student Diversity and Inclusion and University of Delaware Alternative Breaks on Thursday, April 22nd from 6pm-7:30pm for a workshop and moderated Q&A on what defunding the police means in actual practice, and how we build more equitable futures with local racial and environmental justice organizer Christianne Marguerite.  Two of the event’s attendees will win free copies of Mariame Kaba’s new abolitionist book “We Do This ’Til We Free Us.”  

Upcoming “Seeds of Change” Speaker Series on April 22nd | The Associate

During the Trial of Derek Chauvin

Like so many of you, we at CCSD are watching and paying attention to the trial of Derek Chauvin in Minnesota, the former officer who killed George Floyd.  Listening to the testimony and rewatching the video can be retraumatizing and has an impact on us all. We are aware that each of us is waiting and hoping for a just outcome, and some measure of peace for George Floyd’s family.

We encourage you to reflect on your thoughts and feelings (e.g., journaling and meditation), and process your experience with your friends and family members – we are all dealing with this in some way.  And if you feel like talking to a professional about how you are doing with these experiences, please reach out and find us at CCSD.

If you are a student of color and would like to talk to one of our staff of color, consider accessing our Student of Color Virtual Drop-In Hours (more information below).  You can access any of our services by calling our main number 302-831-2141 and asking to speak with a counselor.  You may call M-F, 8-5.

Of course, the UD Helpline is also available for your support (24/7: 831-1001).  And there are 2 text lines that provide support as well (UD Crisis Text Line: Text “UDTEXT”, or “STEVE” for students of color, to 741741).

Please take good care of yourself during these trying times and connect with places that provide you a sense of community.

Student of Color Virtual Drop-in hours:   Students of color can meet with staff of color without going through our triage process.  To access these appointments, call our main number and request one of these meetings.  You will be offered the first available open time.  Current hours are Mondays 10:00 A.M & 3:00 P.M., Tuesdays 10:00 A.M., Wednesdays 2:00 P.M., and Thursdays 11:00 A.M & 2:00 P.M.

Graduate Students of Color Discussion Series: A space for grad students of color to talk about surviving and finding ways to thrive in a PWI.  April’s Topic of the Month: Power.  Friday, 4/9 and 4/23 – 1-2pm.

Online Self-Care Resources from CCSD are available here: https://sites.udel.edu/counseling/self/

Anti-Asian Racism

In recent weeks, we have seen a horrifying rise in anti-Asian racism across the United States. Numerous crimes of hate and acts of violence have been committed against Asian and Asian American individuals and communities, and these are only the ones that have been documented publicly. Throughout the pandemic, these hateful attacks have at times averaged approximately 100 per day, and the group STOP AAPI Hate – dedicated to ending hate crimes against Asian American Pacific Islander communities – received reports of more than 2,800 incidents of anti-Asian hate between March and December 2020. Most recently, this violence has included the murder of 84-year-old Thai-American Vicha Ratanapakdee in San Francisco, three brutal assaults in Oakland’s Chinatown district, the assault on Noriko Nasu and her boyfriend in Seattle, and an attack on a 52-year-old Asian American woman standing outside a New York City bakery.

The Center for Counseling and Student Development extends our hearts out to the victims of this violence and their families, and adamantly condemns these acts of racism and White supremacy. We also recognize that this form of hate is not new. There exists a long history of violence and racism against Asian and Asian American people in the U.S., embedded deeply within the institutional and social fabric of this country and driven, upheld, and normalized by its White supremacist foundations and history. During the pandemic, xenophobia and hate crimes against Asian and Asian American communities have been fueled by conspiracy theories and racist lies perpetuated on social media and by prominent members of the government. Furthermore, the historical impacts of the “Model Minority” myth and the unique ways Asian Americans are positioned within the racial hierarchy of the U.S. often render racial violence against Asian and Asian American people invisible. Finally, whether experienced directly or vicariously via media exposure, anti-Asian racism can have adverse impacts on the psychological health of Asian and Asian American individuals, including heightened anxiety, depression, and racial trauma.

This violence reminds us all of the continued work we must do to combat racism, White supremacy, hate, and violence in all of its forms. We call on all members of the UD community to stand in solidarity against these attacks. Especially during this time of disconnection, we encourage members of this community to reach out to each other and offer support.

For any students in the UD community who would like to speak with a counselor to receive support in processing and coping with experiences of racialized trauma, abuse, harassment, discrimination, or violence, please contact us at 302-831-2141.

Students of color can also meet with staff of color during Students of Color Virtual Drop-In Hours without going through CCSD’s triage process. To access these appointments, please call our main number (302-831-2141) and request one of these drop-in meetings. You’ll be offered the first available time. Current hours are Mondays 10am and 3pm, Tuesdays 10am, Wednesdays 2pm, and Thursdays 11am and 2pm. If these times do not work for you, please let our front desk staff know you would like to meet with a Counselor of Color and we will work with you to have you meet with one of them.

The UD Helpline is available 24/7/365 for phone support at 302-831-1001. People of color can also text STEVE to 741741 for a crisis counselor.

Students can also reach out to the office of Student Diversity and Inclusion, which has resources for Asian Pacific Islander and Desi American students.

Those wanting to engage in action to support the work of ending hate crimes against AAPI communities can also go to STOP AAPI Hate’s website

Black History Month

The CCSD would like to honor Black History Month by acknowledging, in this time of another racial reckoning, that Black history is American history.  Our schools and our history books have been woefully inept at telling the story of the Black experience in our country. The contributions of Black Americans have barely been acknowledged let alone celebrated.  There are many books available that can help you learn more about Black resilience and protest in the face of oppression and racism.  We hope you will explore the resources available and make a commitment to learning and spreading the word about Black contributions and struggles in America because it is an important part of all of our history.  This knowledge is critical for healing our divided nation.  May this journey take you well beyond the month of February. Below you will find links to many different resources sent out by UD’s Student Diversity and Inclusion

https://www.udel.edu/udaily/2021/february/black-history-month-events-diversity-equity-inclusion-learning/

 

Learning & Resources

Read This:

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Listen:

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Watch This: 

Black History Mo & Beyond Book GiveawayBlack History Month & Beyond Book Giveaway

To kick off Black History Month, we are giving away copies of recent books by two Black womxn building new realities where all Black lives matter; The Purpose of Power: How We Come Together When We Fall Apart by Alicia Garza (@chasinggarza) and Our Time is Now by Stacey Abrams (@staceyabrams).

Enter to win the book giveaway by commenting on this post and telling us what Black author that you’ve read is most inspiring to you in this moment.

Giveaway winners will be randomly chosen by the end of the month. Enter NOW through February 28th at 11:59pm and winners will be announced on March 1st on our Instagram!


UD Celebrates Black History Month

Article by Diane Stopyra Photo by Evan Krape February 01, 2021
UD honors the contributions of African Americans in art, literature, advocacy. Click here to explore all the events and opportunities around campus during Black History Month.


Lift Every VoiceLift Every Voice
Celebrating 250 Years of African American Poetry: An Online Exhibition
Lift Every Voice is a year-long, nationwide celebration of the 250-year tradition of African American poetry, its richness and diversity, and its central place in American poetry. The initiative is directed by Library of America in partnership with the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and with libraries, arts organizations, and bookstores in all fifty states. It is supported by funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and Emerson Collective.

Online exhibition design by Dustin Frohlich.


Social Justice Resource FairStudent Diversity & Inclusion
News and Opportunities

Social Justice Resource Fair
Student Diversity & Inclusion (SDI)
February 18 | 6 p.m.

Register Here
Drop into the Social Justice Resource Fair on Gather.Town to engage with different groups, organizations and programs to learn more about getting involved in social justice education & initiatives.
Registration for this event is REQUIRED to be added to the Gather.Town platform. Register Here!


Follow Student Diversity & Inclusion on Instagram!
Student Diversity & Inclusion (SDI)

Click to join Student Diversity & Inclusion on Instagram for news, resources & giveaways!

 


Events & Opportunities Around CampusSocial Justice & Healthcare

Discussion Disparities within the Healthcare System
UDance

Monday, February 8 | 6 p.m.
Zoom Link

Please join UDance as we host a discussion to start to open doors to racial disparities within the healthcare system. This discussion will be led by two members of our faculty, Dr. Latoya Watson, Mother of B+ Hero Mariah and UD Assistant Dean of the Associate in Arts Program and Dr. Erin Knight, UD Assistant

Martin Luther King Day 2021

MLKMartin Luther King Jr. day is Monday, January 18th.  It’s a day without classes when the University is otherwise closed.  All of us at CCSD encourage the UD community to reflect on and make use of the day in ways that honor the legacy of Dr. King, those beside him, and countless others before and after him in the struggle to achieve a socially just society.

Dr. King was a leader of the civil rights movement who strove for racial justice with great courage and personal sacrifice. He worked tirelessly until his assassination, and there remains much work to be done to create the just and equitable society he envisioned. When we are assaulted daily by reports of hate, racism, and violence, this day offers an opportunity to make positive change.

You may well ask: ‘Why direct action? Why sit-ins, marches and so forth? Isn’t negotiation a better path?’ You are quite right in calling for negotiation. Indeed, this is the very purpose of direct action. Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue.” (Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter from Birmingham Jail”)

Please consider this a “day on, not a day off” by doing something for your community to honor his legacy.  Even during a pandemic, it’s possible to make meaning of the day.  And then consider making the effort last the rest of the week, the rest of the year, and the rest of your life. 

https://www.udel.edu/udaily/2021/january/martin-luther-king-jr-national-day-service-community-engagement-wilmington-newark-litter-clean-up-poetry-reading-food-bank/

 

Following the Riots on the US Capitol and other State Capitols

We at CCSD want to acknowledge the unsurprising but horrific and disgusting events in our nation’s capital yesterday.  Terrorists breached our Capitol, at the invitation of the president of the United States,  with very little resistance from the forces that are tasked with protecting our democracy and our citizens, resistance that was easily mustered against the Black Lives Matter protests last summer.

We recognize the emotional and psychological impact of witnessing violence, terrorism, and racist acts even if they take place at a physical distance, for all students and particularly for our BIPOC students.  It amplifies the daily racial trauma they endure. We are in pain as we name this and acknowledge the deep work ahead of this nation and recognize this additional weight on our collective mental health.  We ask all who have white privilege on campus, to examine your hearts and beliefs and challenge yourself to help make the UD community a more inclusive and safer environment for all.

For those Black Identified students who need a place of support, we have the Black Identified Student Support Group that meets via Zoom on Tuesdays from 3- 4:30 pm. It is facilitated by Dr. Ghynecee Temple and Dr. Jennifer Major. If you would like to join, please see the flyer for RSVP information.

The UDHelpline is available 24x7x365 for phone support at 302-831-1001.

People of color can also text STEVE to 741741 for a crisis counselor.

We would also like to provide some helpful links.

Campaign Zero  is a project of the non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, “We The Protesters,” that encourages policymakers to focus on solutions with the strongest evidence of effectiveness at reducing police violence: https://www.joincampaignzero.org/
Where Change Started
Don’t Talk about Implicit Bias Without Talking about Structural Racism
Threats to Equity: White Supremacist and Colonial Logic
Blaming Trump is too Easy: This is Us
Showing Up For Racial Justice

Elliot Page

On December 1, 2020, Elliot Page opened up to the world via Instagram about being transgender and non-binary. Page, who uses he/him or they/them pronouns and starred in the films Juno and X-Men and Netflix show Umbrella Academy, wrote the following in his social media post:

“I feel overwhelming gratitude for the incredible people who have supported me along this journey. I can’t begin to express how remarkable it feels to finally love who I am enough to pursue my authentic self. I’ve been endlessly inspired by so many in the trans community.”

Page further wrote that his joy in making this announcement also feels “fragile,” because he recognizes that discrimination, hate, and violence toward trans folx is still widespread and carries “horrific consequences.” In 2020 alone, at least 40 trans people have been murdered in the United States, most of whom were Black and Latinx trans women. These individuals include Aerrion Burnett, Nina Pop, Felycya Harris, Tony McDade, and many others, given that these murders are often misreported or not reported at all. Furthermore, just days before Page’s announcement, actress and advocate Laverne Cox shared that she and a friend were victims of a transphobic attack while hiking near Los Angeles.

CCSD celebrates Page’s authenticity and courage in sharing themself with the world. We also recognize that countless trans, non-binary, gender non-conforming, and genderqueer folx – including those who are studying and working at the University of Delaware – are still forced to live in silence and fear due to transphobia and oppression. CCSD encourages all members of the UD community – especially those who identify as cisgender (those who are not transgender, meaning that their gender identity aligns with the sex assigned to them at birth) – to deepen and expand their understanding of what it means to be a trans or non-binary person, and to work tirelessly toward a future in which all human beings can live in safety as their authentic selves. Some resources are included below for members of the trans and non-binary community at UD, as well as resources for allies to support and empower trans folx in our lives and communities.

This article, for example, by GLAAD (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation), provides guidelines for communicating about Page and other trans and non-binary people, including use of correct pronouns and avoidance of “deadnaming”. While written specifically for journalists, the article also provides important and valuable information for cisgender people.

Other resources: 

Native American Heritage Month

November is Native American Heritage Month. It is a time to reflect and celebrate the culture and traditions of American Indian and Alaskan Native people. Celebrating the contributions of American Indian and Alaskan Native folks during the month of November began in 1990 when George H. W. Bush declared this month National American Indian Heritage Month. CCSD encourages the UD community to continue to develop their knowledge and understanding of Indigenous culture through conversations, articles, books, and movies. Please find a list of resources below.

University of Delaware is located on land that was and continues to be home to the Nanticoke and Lenni-Lenape people. We express gratitude and honor the people who have inhabited, cultivated, and nourished this land for thousands of years. For additional information regarding local tribes, please visit our Indigenous People’s Day blog post: Indigenous Peoples Day | Center for Counseling & Student Development | UD Division of Student Life.

Finally, while Native American Heritage Month is a time to celebrate, we would be remiss not to acknowledge the historic and systematic oppression that Native folks have endured since our nation’s founding. In celebrating their rich and diverse cultures, we also acknowledge what has been lost. 

Walter Wallace Jr.

At the Center for Counseling & Student Development, we mourn the tragic murder of Walter Wallace Jr., a husband, father, son, Black man and member of the Philadelphia Community. His family announced that he was battling a mental illness and experiencing a mental health crisis. They called for help, not the police who shot and killed him. More training and resources–especially around de-escalation techniques and non-lethal means of restraint–for those working with and responding to people experiencing a mental health crisis are greatly needed.

As a center, we unequivocally condemn acts of racism and white supremacy and stand in support of the ongoing protests calling for justice and accountability. We believe Black Lives Matter and we recognize the impact Mr. Wallace’s murder has on the Black Community and on our Black and Brown students on campus.

If you find that you need individual support in processing your experience, or would just like to speak with a counselor, contact us at 302-831-2141.

For those Black Identified students who need a place of support, we have the Black Identified Student Support Group that meets via Zoom on Tuesdays from 3- 4:30 pm. It is facilitated by Dr. Ghynecee Temple and Dr. Jennifer Major. If you would like to join, please see the flyer for RSVP information.

Students of Color Virtual Drop-in hours:   Students of color can meet with staff of color without going through our triage process.  To access these appointments, call our main number and request one of these meetings.  You will be offered the first available open time.  Current hours are Tuesdays at 1:00 P.M., Wednesday at 11:00 A.M. & 1:00 P.M., and Fridays at 11:00 A.M. If these times do not work with your schedule, please let our front desk staff know you would like to meet with a Counselor of Color and we will work with you to have you meet with one of them.

The UDHelpline is available 24x7x365 for phone support at 302-831-1001.

People of color can also text STEVE to 741741 for a crisis counselor.

We would also like to provide some helpful links.

Campaign Zero  is a project of the non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, “We The Protesters,” that encourages policymakers to focus on solutions with the strongest evidence of effectiveness at reducing police violence: https://www.joincampaignzero.org/

The Marshall Project  since 2014, has been curating some of the best criminal justice reporting from around the web:  https://www.themarshallproject.org/records/3382-police-abolition#

 

Nigerian Anti SARS Protests

The shootings of dozens of peaceful protesters in Nigeria is horrifying and absolutely wrong!  For some in the UD community, this violence comes even closer to home.  Whether you are an international student from Nigeria or person supporting the human rights violations young Nigerians were protesting, we here at CCSD offer our support to you, our Blue Hen community.

CCSD invites any student affected by the violence in Nigeria to seek out supportive counseling services from our CCSD counseling staff, as we recognize that such events and the ongoing stress resulting from them can be overwhelming and make it difficult to cope and navigate one’s role as a student. Please visit our main page for information regarding appointment hours and drop-in hours.

Brad Wolgast and Ogechi Nwordu

Indigenous Peoples Day

October 12 is Indigenous Peoples Day. Indigenous Peoples Day acknowledges the impact of European settlement and celebrates Indigenous resilience throughout the Americas. It advocates for Native visibility and representation. It has been adopted by multiple states and cities in the U.S. in an effort to reclaim the whitewashed narrative and the erasure of the true histories of colonialism, genocide, and racism that Native peoples have experienced and continue to face.

In observance of Indigenous Peoples Day, the CCSD acknowledges that the Delaware River and surrounding lands have been home to the Lenape people for thousands of years. We remember the original inhabitants of this land, the Lenape people, past and present, and honor the First State with gratitude for its Indigenous stewards.

Other ways to support the Indigenous population include attending an online class on Native American history, listening to music by a Native artist, or learning about the history of the land that you occupy.

For more information on Native culture and history, as well as online programs, please visit the National Museum of the American Indian: https://americanindian.si.edu

For more information about local tribes, please see:
lenapeindiantribeofdelaware.com
https://www.lenape-nation.org
https://nlltribe.com
http://www.ramapoughlenapenation.org

Statement Regarding Breonna Taylor

To the UD community:

We at CCSD want to express our collective grief and anger in regards to the unjust verdict of the grand jury indictment of the Breonna Taylor criminal case. Breonna Taylor’s life mattered.  All Black lives matter. We stand with our Black Identified UD community against these repeated actions of police brutality, violence and systemic oppression towards Black Folx, and understand that this can be a difficult time for many. We at CCSD are aware of the emotional impact of Breonna Taylor’s murder, and countless other acts of violence towards Black Folx, has on our Blue Hen Community. It’s worth saying again that it is normal to experience strong emotions related to these repeated racial traumas which can range from anger to despair, fear and hopelessness, and chronic exhaustion. We at CCSD want to let you know we are here to support you.  Below are several of our resources for our students who may need emotional support during these times.

For those Black Identified students who need a place of support, we have the Black Identified Student Support Group that meets via Zoom on Tuesdays from 3- 4:30 pm. It is facilitated by Dr. Ghynecee Temple and Dr. Jennifer Major. If you would like to join, please see the flyer for RSVP information.

If you find that you need support in processing your experience, or would just like to speak with a counselor, contact us at 302-831-2141.

Student of Color Virtual Drop-in hours:   Students of color can meet with staff of color without going through our triage process.  To access these appointments, call our main number and request one of these meetings.  You will be offered the first available open time.  Current hours are Tuesdays at 1:00 P.M., Wednesday at 11:00 A.M. & 1:00 P.M., and Fridays at 11:00 A.M. If these times do not work with your schedule, please let our front desk staff know you would like to meet with a Counselor of Color and we will work with you to have you meet with one of them.

The UDHelpline is available 24x7x365 for phone support at 302-831-1001.

People of color can also text STEVE to 741741 for a crisis counselor.

Black student support group Fall 20

Blue Hen Bounty

Blue Hen Bounty is a student-run food pantry that provides supplemental nutrition to all UD students in need of this support.   They are currently open and available by appointment only.  Please visit their website for more information, or click on the picture below for a downloadable .PDF.

Blue Hen Bounty

A Message from the CCSD to the Black Community

On the eve of the fall semester, our hearts are heavy following another week of unspeakable violence and trauma against Black Americans. We at the CCSD, stand in solidarity with our UD Black community and condemn the violence and re-traumatization towards Black people across the nation.  The shooting of Jacob Blake–now paralyzed–by a white police officer and the murders of peaceful protesters in the past week have been horrifying and continue to remind us of the violence against Black and Brown people that has been happening this year…and for hundreds of years.

The death of Chadwick Boseman was another blow. A man who inspired so many of us with his work in films like Black Panther lost a long and largely private battle with cancer.  For our community members of color, we know this is heartbreaking news at a time already marred by the loss of far too many role models and leaders. Of Boseman, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar wrote: “He was and is a celluloid monument as powerful as the Lincoln Memorial, a visual manifestation of the qualities African Americans strive for, so that his name itself conjures the image of a black man with integrity and courage.”

It’s been a challenging year in many ways. At the CCSD, we encourage you to practice self-care in whatever way is meaningful to you.  Connect with your friends and family.  Talk about what it’s like for you to hear about and consider these many losses and continued acts of violence. Think about what you can do to make your world and your community a better place. And if you think talking to a professional counselor could be helpful for you, please give us a call.

If you’re an ally and would like to help bring about change, here are some organizations to consider:

Support for the Loss of The Chabad Center

The CCSD recognizes and mourns the loss by arson of the Chabad Center for Jewish Life. A source of support and fellowship for our Jewish students, faculty, and staff, the Chabad Center was an active part of the university’s faith community. We condemn this act of anti-Semitism, which has undoubtedly brought forth fear, anxiety, and generational trauma in our Jewish community. Students impacted by this loss are encouraged to contact our center at 302-831-2141 or call the UD Helpline at 302-831-1001.

To donate to the GoFundMe established to help rebuild the Center, go to:

Tragedy in Lebanon

We at the CCSD join the world in mourning the horrific explosion in Beirut, Lebanon on Tuesday, August 4th, 2020. With over 100 dead and thousands injured and displaced, our hearts go out to the residents of Beirut, and to all Lebanese people in our UD community and around the world. In the midst of a worldwide pandemic, this additional trauma is all the more difficult to absorb. If you are a UD student who has been impacted by this event, please reach out to the counseling center at 302-831-2141 or the UD Helpline at 831-1001 (24/7). 

Resources for resilience and self-care in times of crisis:
Building resilience to manage indirect exposure to terror 
101 Ways to take care of yourself when the world feels overwhelming
Taking care of yourself
Coping with disaster

Additional UD Resources for Support:
UD’s Office for International Students and Scholars: (http://www1.udel.edu/oiss/)
Office of Dean of Students: (https://sites.udel.edu/deanofstudents/)

Ways to assist relief efforts in Beirut:
The Lebanese Red Cross
Impact Lebanon’s Fundraiser
The Embrace Lifeline is a helpline that provides mental health support for those in need in Lebanon