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Dr. Jamie McLaren joins the lab!

Dr. Jamie McLaren from the University of Amsterdam has recently joined the lab to work on modelling stopover distributions of migrating landbirds throughout the Northeastern US. We are excited to have him in the lab and look forward to a productive collaboration!

We’re featured on the Great Lakes Now Connect Program

The Great Lakes region is important for the millions of birds that migrate through the area every year, using wetlands, forests, shoreline and more than 32,000 islands as stopover sites. But these habitats and others are under increasing pressure from climate change, habitat loss and other stressors.

Available online via live-stream, The Nature Conservancy and Detroit Public Television will present a panel of experts and video segments to explore these challenges and the solutions facing our feathered friends.

The program aired on GreatLakesNow.org on Tuesday, May 6th from 1 – 2 p.m. EST. You can watch it here… 

Radar Validation Project in the News!

Diane Tennant of The Virginian-Pilot wrote a nice article on our Radar Validation Project. Check it out! http://hamptonroads.com/2013/10/researchers-track-migratory-birds-region

Photo by Steve Earley

NASA – Birds and Radar

Here’s a link to a web piece about our new research project using NASA radar to study bird migration patterns. It’s for a NASA educational website about space and Earth science targeted at upper elementary school students.

http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/birds/

Identifying Important Migratory Landbird Stopover Sites in the Northeast

The North Atlantic LCC is very pleased to be one of the supporters of our project to continue radar studies, and field verification, of migratory landbird stopover habitat in the Northeast. They have developed a webpage that describes the project and includes some links with more information.

http://www.northatlanticlcc.org/projects/bird-radar-group/migratory-landbird-stopover-sites-in-the-northeast

Northeast Migratory Landbird Stopover Sites

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