Student-to-Student Advice

“I was surprised how much work was required for my college classes! I really want to go to dental school, but I was rethinking my decision last year because I was so busy all the time. Then I talked to my peer mentor in my FYE class and realized there isn’t anything else I want to do more. It may be a hard road ahead, but I know I’m brave enough to face the challenge! I get up every morning and look in the mirror and tell myself – “You can do this!” — Sophomore Biological Sciences Major

“My first year in college was kind of a mess. I was kind of a mess. I was homesick and I didn’t get along with my roommate and I didn’t understand how the classes were set up. I kept thinking, I don’t belong here. My RA suggested I go to the Counseling Center, and it was the best decision I ever made. I joined a support group and I realized I don’t have to be ashamed or hide my feelings just because I need help. I’m doing much better this year, and I hope my story will inspire others.” — Sophomore UST student

“Getting to college was exciting and scary and sometimes overwhelming because no one else in my family went to college, and I felt a lot of pressure to be successful. My mom didn’t like that I was undeclared because she worried that it would take me forever to graduate, but I needed time to figure out what I wanted to do. At the end of freshman year, I started to worry that maybe I was just wandering aimlessly, and I decided it was important to pick a major and just go for it. It was easier to get my family’s support once I could say exactly what I was studying.” – Junior Health Behavior Sciences major

Academic Planning: Finish in Four

Although the University of Delaware’s four-year graduation rate of 70 percent is above the national average, efforts to track student progress and enhance advising using the Blue Hen Success Collaborative are expected to help increase retention and graduation rates even further. Data collected using this new system reveal that students who complete at least 30 credits during their first year in college are significantly more likely to graduate in four years. Talk with your advisor about developing an academic plan that includes both the correct number and the appropriate type of credits needed for making progress toward degree completion.

 

Major and Career Exploration: Health and Wellness

One way to learn more about particular majors and related career paths is to become familiar with the professional organizations in those fields of study. For example, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) is a nonprofit  association that represents a diverse membership of health education professionals and students. SOPHE members work in schools, universities, health care facilities, worksites, and government agencies. Their primary purpose is to raise awareness about the connection between health and the surrounding environment.If you are interested in learning about how to prevent disease, prolong life, and improve people’s mental and physical well-being, consider a major in Health Behavior Science (HBS). HBS majors gain the knowledge and skills to promote healthy lifestyles through conducting needs assessments, identifying health priorities, creating evidence-based health programs, and evaluating the impacts and outcomes of health promotion activities. Graduates of this program may find employment as a wellness coordinator, someone who manages fitness programs and wellness services in a variety of settings, including corporate gyms, non-profit recreational facilities, and university health centers.

 

 

In the Know: The Advising Relationship

Students are equal partners in the advising process. As an advisee, you are ultimately responsible for your academic and career decisions. Academic advisors are best able to assist you when you:

  • devote time and energy to reflecting on and clarifying your values, abilities, interests, and goals;
  • maintain contact with your advisor at relevant times during the semester (e.g. registration, midterm);
  • adequately prepare for advising sessions by reviewing the university catalog and course offerings; and
  • write down your questions to make sure you don’t forget to cover something important at your meeting.