Annotated phishing examples

The Phishing category in this site’s main blog roll contains many recent examples of phishing scams seen at UD. Some additional annotated phishing messages are displayed below. If you receive a message like any of these, delete it immediately.

2009 phishing example 1

This message looks like it comes from a UD email address, but note that the link you are asked to click is NOT a UD Web address. A UD address will always contain udel.edu (note the spelling and punctuation). In this example, the address contains udeledu.net, not udel.edu.

2009 phishing example 2

This message claims it is not spam, but note the tell-tale signs of a phishing scam. No reputable organization will ever send you email asking you to provide private information via email.

2009 phishing example 3

This one is easy to spot as a phishing scam: it does not come from a udel.edu email address, it contains typos, it contains grammatical errors and “non-fluent” English, it refers to the UD community as customers, and it asks for too much information. No reputable organization will ever send you email asking you to provide private information via email.

2010 phishing example 1

At first glance, this appears to resemble a legitimate Apple message. You can tell it’s a phishing message because the order totals don’t match, and it’s not addressed to your email address specifically.


You are a target. Information security is everyone’s responsibility.