About maker thinking

Maker thinking for active learning.  Creation and iteration as extensions of problem-based learning form the basis for maker thinking. Makerspaces have made a splash in the academic world and through this theme you will learn how to incorporate creation technology into your course. This theme will help you capitalize on teaching opportunities throughout the design process–from conception to the completed project.

Making “making” accessible: Analyzing the opportunities and challenges for 3D printing in education, therapy, and assistive technology

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 9:35 – 10:10 a.m.
Location: Mitchell Hall Theater

In this session, Amy Hurst will discuss her research working with educators, therapists, and end-users to understand the opportunities to integrate Doing it Yourself (DIY) and Maker Culture into their daily practice. She will present common obstacles that she and her students have identified through working closely with these populations who are learning this technology. She will draw from these experiences to provide concrete recommendations for those interested in incorporating Making and 3D printing into their work.

 

[146]

Amy Hurst

Amy Hurst    
Assistant Professor, Human-Centered Computing, University of Maryland Baltimore County

Amy Hurst is an Assistant Professor of Human-Centered Computing in the Information Systems department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). She is a member of the Interactive Systems Research Center and runs the Prototyping and Design Lab. She received her BS in Computer Science at Georgia Tech, and her MS and PhD in Human-Computer Interaction at Carnegie Mellon. Her research interests are centered aroundempowerment, and most of her projects explore engaging people with disabilities in the DIY / Maker movement and building software that automatically adapts to user needs. Find out more at amyhurst.com.

What’s so great about “makers”?

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 10:45 – 11:20 a.m.
Location: Mitchell Hall Theater

Have you ever wondered, “What exactly is a ‘maker’?” or “How is ‘making’ or a ‘makerspace’ different from what people have been doing for years from art to engineering?” In this session, Georgia Guthrie will do her best to answer these questions, and more. She’ll talk about how the “Maker” movement came about, and what sets it apart from other communities and practices centered around hands-on work. She’ll also discuss how makerspaces can be optimized to promote high levels of engagement and creativity for all participants. The session will explore the future potential of makerspaces on campus for interdisciplinary connections and novel learning.

 

[146]

Georgia Guthrie

Georgia Guthrie    
Executive Director, The Hacktory

Georgia Guthrie is formally trained as a human-centered designer and art historian. Her DNA, interests, and life experiences have made her a maker. Her professional work is focused right now on being the Executive Director of The Hacktory, a hacker/makerspace in Philadelphia, PA. Formerly, she was a designer at the Action Mill, where she helped conceptualize, design, and launch My Gift of Grace, a game to help individuals and families talk about end-of-life issues. This spring, she was a student at the School for Poetic Computation. Find out more at georgiaguthrie.com.

Conceptualizing and prototyping (maker workshop 1)

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 1:00 – 3:15 p.m.
Location: 218 Gore Hall
Representing the need for STE(A)M education in higher education, workshop leaders will guide participants through the process of creative prototyping: a hands-on experience of manifesting ideas into electro-mechanical objects. This thinking-through-making workshop will allow faculty to experience the “maker” approach to cross-disciplinary higher education as a response to the needs of our students and society.(Participants can take all three of this week’s maker workshops as a series or participate in any one or two of the sessions independently.)

<p>&nbsp;</p>

[146]

Georgia Guthrie

Georgia Guthrie    
Executive Director, The Hacktory

Georgia Guthrie is formally trained as a human-centered designer and art historian. Her DNA, interests, and life experiences have made her a maker. Her professional work is focused right now on being the Executive Director of The Hacktory, a hacker/makerspace in Philadelphia, PA. Formerly, she was a designer at the Action Mill, where she helped conceptualize, design, and launch My Gift of Grace, a game to help individuals and families talk about end-of-life issues. This spring, she was a student at the School for Poetic Computation. Find out more at georgiaguthrie.com.

[146]

Ashley Pigford

Ashley Pigford    
Associate Professor, Art & Design

Ashley John Pigford, Associate Professor of Graphic and Interaction Design at the University of Delaware, applies design thinking to interrogate meaningful relationships between technology, materials and human experience. He received his MFA in Graphic Design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2006 and his BS in Visual Communications from the University of Delaware in 1996. From 1996-2003 He had a successful career as co-founder and Creative Director of a design company in Los Angeles, CA. His notable design work includes motion graphics for Firefly TV series and DMX’s “Who We Be” music video, plus packaging design for Blink 182’s major label debut “Dude Ranch”. He has received research grants from the Center for Creativity, Craft and Design, the University of Delaware and the Creative Arts Council at Brown University, and a State of Delaware Established Artist Fellowship.

Two sides of 3D printing

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 10:20 a.m. – 12 noon, third of three presentations at this time
Location: 104 Gore Hall

Anna Wik and Roger Wagner will present two perspectives on 3D visualization tools.

From Anna:
To design a compelling physical space, it is necessary to conceive of and represent an idea in multiple dimensions, planes, and scales. In the course CAD for Site Design, landscape design & civil engineering students use 3D printing technology to create a scaled physical representation of an object of their own design. In this case, the object was a simple site furnishing, which they first draw by hand, then in AutoCAD, and finally modeled using SketchUp before sending it to print.

This iterative design process allows students to repeatedly test their design, as well as investigate the material limitations and use of 3D printing as a tool. 3D printing technology has applications in the world of landscape architecture as a mechanism to design and fabricate complex site furnishings or other hardscape elements. This allows the entire process to stay in the designers hands as designs can be transmitted directly to fabricator, without the use of a contractor or traditional construction documentation.

From Roger:
Digital three dimensional files can be generated by various kinds of microscopy, x-ray scans and scanning devices. This data must be rendered (given a surface), scaled and converted to a file format which is used by 3D printers. Printed 3D models can be exceptionally useful in teaching structure and form where tactile sensations coupled with visual input enhance understanding such as in the anatomical sciences.

 

[146]

Roger Wagner

Roger Wagner    
Professor Emeritus, Biological Sciences

Dr. Wagner is a native of Minnesota and completed his Ph.D. in Cell Biology in 1971. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Yale University Medical School from 71-73 and then joined the faculty at the U. of D. He retired in 2006 but remains active in teaching (Microscopic Anatomy) and collaborative research involving 3D modeling and printing of blood vascular systems and Zooplankton (Radiolarians and Foraminiferans).

[146]

Anna Wik

Anna Wik    
Assistant Professor, Plant & Soil Sciences

Anna Wik is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and a registered landscape architect. She has designed, documented, and managed construction of many landscape projects in the region, working with community and non-profit partners including Philadelphia Parks and Recreation, the Philadelphia Water Department, Longwood Gardens, and numerous community groups. Anna’s courses investigate the relationship between the practice of design and the built environment, and her design focus is on the urban landscape, the creation of equitable public space, and the impact of community partnerships. She is extremely excited about the new professional degree program, the Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture, being offered for the first time in fall of 2016.

Tools and tours (maker workshop 2)

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Start at 1:00 by picking up your tour route in the Gore Rotunda

(Participants can take all three of this week’s maker workshops as a series or participate in any one or two of the sessions independently.)

Maker tour map for June 1

Maker tour map for June 1 (click for Google Map)

This session will explore the tools of making through a tour of the following University of Delaware maker resources.

  • Geotechnology Education Laboratory (GEL) in Penny Hall 203A
    Guide: Michael O’Neal, Geological Sciences
    The availability of open-source micro-controller kits that can be used to build simple digital devices to sense our environment sense has changed how we make observations in our daily life. Whether it’s a sensor that lets you know your basement is flooding or an array of sensors that tells you about global climate change, the technologies behind our observations are very similar at their core. In the Geotechnology Education Laboratory in Penny Hall, users will get a hands-on experience in sensing different aspects of their environment (moisture, temperature, and light) using Arduino micro-controllers.
  • Design Studio (D Studio), 109 Spencer Lab
    Guide: Dustyn Roberts, Mechanical Engineering
    Introduction to laser cutting.
  • BluePrint 3D Studio, 004 Smith Hall 
    Guides: Jevonia Harris & Pavani Vemuri, Academic Technology Services
    Introduction to 3D printing
  • Maker Studio, Studio Arts building (Ashley Pigford, Art & Design)
    Guide: Ashley Pigford, Art & Design
    Introduction to facilities dedicated to developing the next generation of artists, designers, engineers, and entrepreneurs, this facility includes a laser cutting, 3D printing, electronics lab and more.

 

Jevonia Harris    
Digital Media Specialist, IT Academic Technology Services
[146]

Michael O'Neal

Michael O'Neal    
Associate Professor, Geological Sciences

Michael O’Neal's research centers on finding unique ways to observe and characterize human-induced changes to the Earth’s surface, ranging in cause from deforestation to climate change.  He employs technology such as 3D laser scanners to assess landscapes, drone-mounted cameras to collect custom aerial imagery, and environmental sensors to monitor attributes such as temperature, humidity, moisture, and others. Because commercially available technology rarely addresses the specific needs of his projects or field sites, his research group constantly adapts and modifies off-the-shelf equipment to suit their evolving field experiences and research needs.

[146]

Ashley Pigford

Ashley Pigford    
Associate Professor, Art & Design

Ashley John Pigford, Associate Professor of Graphic and Interaction Design at the University of Delaware, applies design thinking to interrogate meaningful relationships between technology, materials and human experience. He received his MFA in Graphic Design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2006 and his BS in Visual Communications from the University of Delaware in 1996. From 1996-2003 He had a successful career as co-founder and Creative Director of a design company in Los Angeles, CA. His notable design work includes motion graphics for Firefly TV series and DMX’s “Who We Be” music video, plus packaging design for Blink 182’s major label debut “Dude Ranch”. He has received research grants from the Center for Creativity, Craft and Design, the University of Delaware and the Creative Arts Council at Brown University, and a State of Delaware Established Artist Fellowship.

[146]

Dustyn Roberts

Dustyn Roberts    
Assistant Professor, Instruction, Mechanical Engineering

Dustyn is a Philadelphia-based engineer and Assistant Professor of Instruction at the University of Delaware, where she teaches classes focused on interdisciplinary design and robotics. Dustyn holds a BS in Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, an MS in Biomechanics & Movement Science from the University of Delaware, and a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from New York University.

Pavani Vemuri    
Graduate Assistant, IT Academic Technology Services

Build your idea (maker workshop 3)

Date: Thursday, June 2
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., with a break for lunch
Location: based on your team selection, choose from the list below.

Maker activity map for June 2

Activity map for June 2 (click for Google Map)

Following up on yesterday’s tour of maker facilities, participants will build using one of four activities.

Laser cutting. Design Studio (D Studio), 109 Spencer Lab (Dustyn Roberts, Mechanical Engineering)

3D printing. BluePrint 3D Studio, Smith Hall (Jevonia Harris & Pavani Vemuri, IT Academic Technology Services)

Arduino sensors & motors. “The Pit”, 134 Spencer Lab. (Michael O’Neal, Geological Sciences and Ashley Pigford, Art & Design)

References:
Arduino IDE Software

FTDI Drivers

Spark Fun Inventor’s Kit

Build a push-button controller, a variation of the “wireless music veto button”. Faculty will build a multi-purpose “action button” that can map to a key or series of keystrokes/macros in a laptop or phone. Some faculty may choose to create a video recording button, or PowerPoint slide changer, or something else. Faculty Commons, 116 Pearson Hall (Bryan Givens and Foster Schucker, Barrel of Makers)

 

Jevonia Harris    
Digital Media Specialist, IT Academic Technology Services
Brian Givens    
, Barrel of Makers, Inc.

Find out more about this organization at the Barrel of Makers web site.

[146]

Michael O'Neal

Michael O'Neal    
Associate Professor, Geological Sciences

Michael O’Neal's research centers on finding unique ways to observe and characterize human-induced changes to the Earth’s surface, ranging in cause from deforestation to climate change.  He employs technology such as 3D laser scanners to assess landscapes, drone-mounted cameras to collect custom aerial imagery, and environmental sensors to monitor attributes such as temperature, humidity, moisture, and others. Because commercially available technology rarely addresses the specific needs of his projects or field sites, his research group constantly adapts and modifies off-the-shelf equipment to suit their evolving field experiences and research needs.

[146]

Ashley Pigford

Ashley Pigford    
Associate Professor, Art & Design

Ashley John Pigford, Associate Professor of Graphic and Interaction Design at the University of Delaware, applies design thinking to interrogate meaningful relationships between technology, materials and human experience. He received his MFA in Graphic Design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2006 and his BS in Visual Communications from the University of Delaware in 1996. From 1996-2003 He had a successful career as co-founder and Creative Director of a design company in Los Angeles, CA. His notable design work includes motion graphics for Firefly TV series and DMX’s “Who We Be” music video, plus packaging design for Blink 182’s major label debut “Dude Ranch”. He has received research grants from the Center for Creativity, Craft and Design, the University of Delaware and the Creative Arts Council at Brown University, and a State of Delaware Established Artist Fellowship.

[146]

Dustyn Roberts

Dustyn Roberts    
Assistant Professor, Instruction, Mechanical Engineering

Dustyn is a Philadelphia-based engineer and Assistant Professor of Instruction at the University of Delaware, where she teaches classes focused on interdisciplinary design and robotics. Dustyn holds a BS in Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, an MS in Biomechanics & Movement Science from the University of Delaware, and a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from New York University.

Foster Schucker    
, Barrel of Makers, Inc.

Find out more about this organization at the Barrel of Makers web site.

Pavani Vemuri    
Graduate Assistant, IT Academic Technology Services

Five minutes of fame

Date: Thursday, June 2
Time: 
2:15 – 3:15 p.m.
Location: 
104 Gore Hall

Five Minutes of Fame is a fast-paced session where you can pick up ten exciting ideas, technologies, projects, or resources, all in five minute doses. Presentations can come from any faculty or staff participant at this year’s institute. Want to be considered for this year’s list? E-mail your idea to faculty-commons@udel.edu


My UD Business
Get the mug! Get the scoop. Find out what My UD Business can do for you.

Joy Lynam    
Director, IT Web Development


CritBoard in Canvas
A digital critboard within Canvas that facilitates the project-based learning critique and tangibly engages students in the process.

No Entries Found


Five cool things you can do in Canvas

Mathieu Plourde    
IT Project Leader I, IT Academic Technology Services


Mini Maker Fair 2017

Tanya Looney    
Science Program Manager, Hagley Museum & Library


Canvas Threadz
Threadz is a data visualization tool, and the data for this demonstration will come from SFI2016 Canvas Discussion posts. For best results in this demo, all SFI participants should login to Canvas and make multiple discussion posts!

Becky Kinney    
Educational Technology Consultant II, IT Academic Technology Services


iSchool Animation

Nico Carver    
Assistant Librarian, University of Delaware Library


Maker track participants report on what they made.

Mobile photo safari participants report on what they produced.