Themes

This year’s themes

Makerspaces for active learning

Creation, iteration, and problem-solving in makerspaces. Makerspaces have made a splash in the academic world and through this theme you will learn how to incorporate creation technology into your course. This theme will help you capitalize on teaching opportunities throughout the design process–from conception to the completed project.  View session info for makerspaces for active learning.

Information literacy

The information literacy theme will highlight the evolving nature of information literacy and how it can be supported in the classroom. Join a community of faculty and information professionals who are passionate about helping students successfully negotiate collaborative, dynamic online information environments as consumers and active creators of information, and learn about innovative assignments, tools, and collaborations. Dr. Thomas P. Mackey, Vice Provost for Academic Programs at SUNY Empire State College will provide a keynote on June 1.  View session info for information literacy.

Computational reasoning

SFI 2016 will address the new Gen Ed objective of computational reasoning (CR). Find our what CR is and how you can infuse it into a course that doesn’t have programming. Dr. Jim Kurose, Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation for the Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), will be our keynote speaker on June 2.  View session info for computational reasoning.

About maker thinking

Maker thinking for active learning.  Creation and iteration as extensions of problem-based learning form the basis for maker thinking. Makerspaces have made a splash in the academic world and through this theme you will learn how to incorporate creation technology into your course. This theme will help you capitalize on teaching opportunities throughout the design process–from conception to the completed project.

From the classroom to the president’s office: Thirty-two years at UD

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 9:00 – 9:35 a.m.
Location: Mitchell Hall Theater

 

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Nancy Targett

Nancy Targett    
President, University of Delaware

Dr. Nancy M. Targett is President of the University of Delaware. A member of the UD faculty since 1984, Dr. Targett has served as Dean of the College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment (CEOE) and director of the Delaware Sea Grant College Program since 2005.

A nationally recognized expert on ocean issues, Dr. Targett is immediate past chair of the Board of Trustees of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership and immediate past treasurer of the Sea Grant Association, a national network of 32 Sea Grant College Programs. She has served on the Ocean Studies Board at the National Academy of Sciences and the Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council. She was selected as an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow.

Making “making” accessible: Analyzing the opportunities and challenges for 3D printing in education, therapy, and assistive technology

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 9:35 – 10:10 a.m.
Location: Mitchell Hall Theater

In this session, Amy Hurst will discuss her research working with educators, therapists, and end-users to understand the opportunities to integrate Doing it Yourself (DIY) and Maker Culture into their daily practice. She will present common obstacles that she and her students have identified through working closely with these populations who are learning this technology. She will draw from these experiences to provide concrete recommendations for those interested in incorporating Making and 3D printing into their work.

 

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Amy Hurst

Amy Hurst    
Assistant Professor, Human-Centered Computing, University of Maryland Baltimore County

Amy Hurst is an Assistant Professor of Human-Centered Computing in the Information Systems department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). She is a member of the Interactive Systems Research Center and runs the Prototyping and Design Lab. She received her BS in Computer Science at Georgia Tech, and her MS and PhD in Human-Computer Interaction at Carnegie Mellon. Her research interests are centered aroundempowerment, and most of her projects explore engaging people with disabilities in the DIY / Maker movement and building software that automatically adapts to user needs. Find out more at amyhurst.com.

Lightning round of 3 topics

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 10:10 – 10:25 a.m.
Location: Mitchell Hall Theater

 

Two minutes for two-factor authentication

Richard Gordon    
Manager, IT Communication Group

Diversity

Cheryl Richardson    
Associate Director, Center for Teaching & Assessment of Learning

General education

Chris Knight    
Associate Professor, Kinesiology & Applied Physiology

What’s so great about “makers”?

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 10:45 – 11:20 a.m.
Location: Mitchell Hall Theater

Have you ever wondered, “What exactly is a ‘maker’?” or “How is ‘making’ or a ‘makerspace’ different from what people have been doing for years from art to engineering?” In this session, Georgia Guthrie will do her best to answer these questions, and more. She’ll talk about how the “Maker” movement came about, and what sets it apart from other communities and practices centered around hands-on work. She’ll also discuss how makerspaces can be optimized to promote high levels of engagement and creativity for all participants. The session will explore the future potential of makerspaces on campus for interdisciplinary connections and novel learning.

 

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Georgia Guthrie

Georgia Guthrie    
Executive Director, The Hacktory

Georgia Guthrie is formally trained as a human-centered designer and art historian. Her DNA, interests, and life experiences have made her a maker. Her professional work is focused right now on being the Executive Director of The Hacktory, a hacker/makerspace in Philadelphia, PA. Formerly, she was a designer at the Action Mill, where she helped conceptualize, design, and launch My Gift of Grace, a game to help individuals and families talk about end-of-life issues. This spring, she was a student at the School for Poetic Computation. Find out more at georgiaguthrie.com.

The University of Delaware Community Engagement Initiative: Making a difference – within and beyond UD

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 11:20 – 12 noon
Location: Mitchell Hall Theater

Partnerships form the cornerstone of the new University of Delaware Community Engagement Initiative. Education, health, arts and culture are a few of the partnerships that will be developed in collaboration with University, state, and global partners.

We expect that this new initiative will have great benefits for students, faculty, staff and community partners. Community engagement strengthens student learning. Students learn how the knowledge they obtain can improve the communities where they live and work. Even now, more than half of UD’s students participate in service learning, community-based research and volunteer projects, donating more than 225,000 hours each year to serve communities in Delaware, across the nation and around the world.

With this new Initiative, even more UD students will participate in civic and community engagement. We want to make community engagement part of the defining character of a University of Delaware education. Community engagement also strengthens UD as a major research university, enabling faculty and professionals to craft research that responds to community needs and has greater impact. One of the measures of every great research university is the extent to which the knowledge it generates enriches the quality of life in its own community. We encourage all faculty and staff to be part of the creation of new community engagement programming.

So, join us in a conversation about the Community Engagement Initiative – your participation will contribute to the success of this program.

 

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Lynnette Overby

Lynnette Overby    
Deputy Director, Community Engagement Initiative, and Professor, Theatre

Lynnette Young Overby, Ph.D. is a Professor of Theatre and Dance, and Chair of the Community Engagement Commission at the University of Delaware.  She is the author or coauthor of over 40 publications including eight books. Her honors include the 2000 National Dance Association Scholar/Artist, and the 2004 Leadership Award from the National Dance Education Organization.  She is a strong believer in interdisciplinary education and community engagement. A daCi International At-Large board member, she is the archivist for the organization Dr. Overby is currently collaborating with literary historian P. Gabrielle Foreman on a long term “Performing African American History” research project.She was a member of the dance writing team for the new National Core Arts Standards.

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Dan Rich

Dan Rich    
Director, Community Engagement Initiative, and University Professor of Public Policy, School of Public Policy & Administration

Daniel Rich is Director of the Community Engagement Initiative and University Professor of Public Policy at the University of Delaware. As Director of Community Engagement, he supports the development of new partnerships between the university and communities at all levels, local to global. He holds faculty appointments in the School of Public Policy and Administration and the Department of Political Science and International Relations. He has served on the faculty since 1970, and is the recipient of the University of Delaware’s Medal of Distinction. From 2001-2009 he served as University Provost. From 1996-2001, he served as founding dean of the College of Human Services, Education and Public Policy, and from 1991-1996, as dean of the College of Urban Affairs and Public Policy.

Conceptualizing and prototyping (maker workshop 1)

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 1:00 – 3:15 p.m.
Location: 218 Gore Hall
Representing the need for STE(A)M education in higher education, workshop leaders will guide participants through the process of creative prototyping: a hands-on experience of manifesting ideas into electro-mechanical objects. This thinking-through-making workshop will allow faculty to experience the “maker” approach to cross-disciplinary higher education as a response to the needs of our students and society.(Participants can take all three of this week’s maker workshops as a series or participate in any one or two of the sessions independently.)

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Georgia Guthrie

Georgia Guthrie    
Executive Director, The Hacktory

Georgia Guthrie is formally trained as a human-centered designer and art historian. Her DNA, interests, and life experiences have made her a maker. Her professional work is focused right now on being the Executive Director of The Hacktory, a hacker/makerspace in Philadelphia, PA. Formerly, she was a designer at the Action Mill, where she helped conceptualize, design, and launch My Gift of Grace, a game to help individuals and families talk about end-of-life issues. This spring, she was a student at the School for Poetic Computation. Find out more at georgiaguthrie.com.

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Ashley Pigford

Ashley Pigford    
Associate Professor, Art & Design

Ashley John Pigford, Associate Professor of Graphic and Interaction Design at the University of Delaware, applies design thinking to interrogate meaningful relationships between technology, materials and human experience. He received his MFA in Graphic Design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2006 and his BS in Visual Communications from the University of Delaware in 1996. From 1996-2003 He had a successful career as co-founder and Creative Director of a design company in Los Angeles, CA. His notable design work includes motion graphics for Firefly TV series and DMX’s “Who We Be” music video, plus packaging design for Blink 182’s major label debut “Dude Ranch”. He has received research grants from the Center for Creativity, Craft and Design, the University of Delaware and the Creative Arts Council at Brown University, and a State of Delaware Established Artist Fellowship.

How can you make your classroom more inclusive?

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 1:00 – 3:15 p.m.
Location: 208 Gore Hall

A diversity workshop.

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Jessica Edwards

Jessica Edwards    
Assistant Professor, English

Jessica Edwards, Ph.D. has developed and taught courses in professional writing, critical race studies, and composition studies. Her scholarship considers ways to engage critical race theory, the intersections of race, racism, and power, in writing classrooms. Dr. Edwards was a Faculty Diversity Scholar in 2015 with the Center for Teaching, Assessment, and Learning at UD and her scholarship has appeared in Computers and Composition Online.

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Jill Flynn

Jill Flynn    
Associate Professor, English

A former high school English teacher, Jill Ewing Flynn is currently Associate Professor of English and the Student Teaching Coordinator for the English Education program at UD. Her research and teaching interests include teacher preparation and critical multicultural education, including how issues of race and culture can be productively taken up in middle school, high school, and university classrooms.

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Lindsay Hoffman

Lindsay Hoffman    
Associate Professor, Communication

Lindsay H. Hoffman, Ph.D. (The Ohio State University, 2007) is Associate Professor of Communication with a joint appointment in Political Science & International Relations. She also serves as Associate Director of the University of Delaware’s Center for Political Communication, and is the Director of that Center’s annual National Agenda speaker series. In Fall of 2015, National Agenda took on the theme of “Race in America: Conversations about Identity and Equality.” The combined speaker and film series featured eight conversations and four films about a variety of topics surrounding race in America and at UD. Included were two prominent Black Lives Matter activists (Netta Elzie and DeRay Mckesson), a CBS correspondent who covered the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965 (Bill Plante); an Iranian-American comedian whose just-published memoir is titled “I’m Not a Terrorist, But I’ve Played One on TV” (Maz Jobrani); and many others. To view all the conversations, go to www.del.edu/nationalagenda.

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Nike Olabisi

Nike Olabisi    
Assistant Professor, Biological Sciences

Nike is an Assistant Professor whose primarily teaches freshman introductory biology courses at the Interdisciplinary Science Learning Laboratory.  She obtained her doctorate degree from Rutgers Medical School in Microbiology and Molecular genetics with a focus on Cancer research.  As an NIH postdoctoral fellow in teaching and cancer research she had hands on experiences in the classroom and creates avenues to bring her knowledge of cancer research and molecular biology into her teaching.  She has also been a participant and facilitator at the National academies summer teaching institute and consistently engages active learning strategies and evidence based learning methodologies to get students interested in Science careers.

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Délice Williams

Délice Williams    
Postdoctoral Researcher, English

Délice Williams is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Delaware, where she teaches 1st-year writing. Her other teaching and research interests include South Asian fiction, 19th-century British literature, environmental justice, and postcolonial literature. Her current research focuses on environmental justice and representations of the body in contemporary South Asian fiction.  Before coming to UD she taught writing and literature at an independent K-12 school.

Moderator:

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Cheryl Richardson

Cheryl Richardson    
Associate Director, Center for Teaching & Assessment of Learning

Cheryl R. Richardson, Associate Director of the UD Center for Teaching and Assessment of Learning, works with faculty on exploring new pedagogies and improving existing teaching practices in order to enhance student learning. She brings to this session research, experience working with individual faculty on Scholarship of Teaching and Learning projects at other institutions as well as her own university teaching experiences.

Academic service learning: Engaging students in course-based community engagement

Date: Tuesday, May 31
Time: 1:00-3:15 p.m.
Location: 104 Gore Hall

Bring your ideas for the creation of a new course or the re-design of an existing course to have a community engagement focus. In this interactive workshop, you will brainstorm social issues and challenges that are best aligned with your course goals. Furthermore, you will develop the elements of your syllabus specifically focused on service learning requirements–from types of service to the logistics of teaching such a course. In addition, you will have the opportunity to think about the types of reflections that support your objectives. Finally, various forms of formative and summative assessments will be suggested for inclusion. Individuals are welcome, as are departmental or interdisciplinary teams. When you leave the workshop, you will have a solid blueprint for constructing, teaching, and assessing an academic service learning course.

 

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Lynnette Overby

Lynnette Overby    
Deputy Director, Community Engagement Initiative, and Professor, Theatre

Lynnette Young Overby, Ph.D. is a Professor of Theatre and Dance, and Chair of the Community Engagement Commission at the University of Delaware.  She is the author or coauthor of over 40 publications including eight books. Her honors include the 2000 National Dance Association Scholar/Artist, and the 2004 Leadership Award from the National Dance Education Organization.  She is a strong believer in interdisciplinary education and community engagement. A daCi International At-Large board member, she is the archivist for the organization Dr. Overby is currently collaborating with literary historian P. Gabrielle Foreman on a long term “Performing African American History” research project.She was a member of the dance writing team for the new National Core Arts Standards.

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Sue Serra

Sue Serra    
Assistant Director, Office of Service Learning

Susan Serra serves as Assistant Director of the Office of Service Learning, which she founded in 2004.  She works with faculty, students, and community organizations to develop sustainable partnerships through service-learning and community-based research. She coordinates the Service Learning Scholars, a summer service immersion program and is a member of the national Summer Service Collaborative. Serra served on the steering committee of the UD Carnegie Community Engagement Elective Classification Taskforce and currently serves on the UD Community Engagement Commission. She earned her  M.A. in  Liberal Studies from the University of Delaware.

About information literacy

The information literacy theme will highlight the evolving nature of Information literacy and how it can be supported in the classroom. Join a community of faculty and information professionals who are passionate about helping students successfully negotiate collaborative, dynamic online information environments as consumers and active creators of information, and learn about innovative assignments, tools, and collaborations. Dr. Thomas P. Mackey, Vice Provost for Academic Programs at SUNY Empire State College will provide a keynote on June 1.

Session information for this category will be available soon.

Developing metaliteracy to engage citizens in a connected world

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
Location: Mitchell Hall Theater


Session recording
Presentation file (PDF)

 

As a redefinition of information literacy, metaliteracy shifts the focus from consumer to producer of information, and from user to maker in collaborative makerspaces that are actual and virtual, networked, and social. Metaliteracy is a framework for learning that emphasizes metacognition and the production of original and repurposed information in a participatory and connected world. The metaliterate individual reflects on their own learning, expands quantitative and qualitative reasoning, and contributes to society in a productive and ethical manner as an engaged citizen. Metaliteracy supports our goals as educators to design curriculum that advances critical thinking, reading, writing and creating through multiple formats and settings.

This keynote will explore the theory of metaliteracy and illustrate practical applications in several projects developed by the Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative. This work includes three Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and a competency-based digital badging system. This presentation will introduce the Metaliteracy Learning Goals and Objectives as a flexible, adaptable, and evolving resource, and highlight the influence of metaliteracy on the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.

 

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Tom Mackey

Tom Mackey    
Vice Provost for Academic Programs, SUNY Empire State College

Thomas P. Mackey, Ph. D. is Vice Provost for Academic Programs at SUNY Empire State College. His academic and professional interests are focused on the collaborative development of metaliteracy.  He is interested in the connections to open learning, the design of innovative social spaces, and the critical engagement with emerging technologies. His partnership with Trudi Jacobson to originate the metaliteracy framework emphasizes the reflective learner as producer and participant in dynamic information environments. They co-authored the first article to define this model with Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy (2011) and followed that piece with their book Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (2014).  This team co-authored the essay Proposing a Metaliteracy Model to Redefine Information Literacy (2013) and a new co-edited book for ALA/Neal-Schuman entitled Metaliteracy in Practice (2016). Previously they co-edited several books on faculty-librarian collaboration and co-authored several articles about information literacy. Tom is part of the editorial team for Open Praxis, the open access peer-reviewed academic journal about open, distance and flexible education that is published by the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE). He is also a member of the Advisory Board for Progressio: South African Journal for Open and Distance Learning Practice. Connect with Tom via LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/thomasmackey and Twitter: @TomMackey.

Supporting students as creators: Situating information literacy in the 21st century classroom

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 10:20 a.m. – 12 noon
Location: 208 Gore Hall

Supplemental materials:
SFI2016: Information Literacy and Metaliteracy Toolkit

How can an oral history project help students tackle the contextual nature of authority?  How does the creation of broadsides based upon an historical collection help students examine how the format in which information is delivered impacts the way it is received?  What unique opportunities to examine audience does the creation of a video present to students? Would the experience of creating a data-layered city map increase students’ ability to analyze aspects of inequality along lines of race and class?

This workshop will provide some insight into these questions by highlighting innovative assignments which challenge students to critically engage with information by placing students in the role of creator.

The workshop will feature four lightning talks by faculty members and librarians that will detail these student projects.  Following the lightning talks, participants will have the opportunity to engage in a cross-disciplinary discussion of the challenges inherent in fostering information literacy among students and ideas for taking a metaliteracy-inspired approach to these challenges.

 

Moderators

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Meg Grotti

Meg Grotti    
Associate Librarian and Assistant Head of Instructional Services, Reference and Instructional Services Department, University of Delaware Library

Meg Grotti is an associate librarian and Assistant Head of Instructional Services at the University of Delaware Library, where she provides leadership and support for the cross-departmental team of librarians who provide instructional services.  Meg also serves as library liaison to the School of Education.  Meg holds an MLIS from Syracuse University and an M.Ed in Educational Technology from the University of Delaware.

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Tom Mackey

Tom Mackey    
Vice Provost for Academic Programs, SUNY Empire State College

Thomas P. Mackey, Ph. D. is Vice Provost for Academic Programs at SUNY Empire State College. His academic and professional interests are focused on the collaborative development of metaliteracy.  He is interested in the connections to open learning, the design of innovative social spaces, and the critical engagement with emerging technologies. His partnership with Trudi Jacobson to originate the metaliteracy framework emphasizes the reflective learner as producer and participant in dynamic information environments. They co-authored the first article to define this model with Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy (2011) and followed that piece with their book Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (2014).  This team co-authored the essay Proposing a Metaliteracy Model to Redefine Information Literacy (2013) and a new co-edited book for ALA/Neal-Schuman entitled Metaliteracy in Practice (2016). Previously they co-edited several books on faculty-librarian collaboration and co-authored several articles about information literacy. Tom is part of the editorial team for Open Praxis, the open access peer-reviewed academic journal about open, distance and flexible education that is published by the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE). He is also a member of the Advisory Board for Progressio: South African Journal for Open and Distance Learning Practice. Connect with Tom via LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/thomasmackey and Twitter: @TomMackey.


How can an oral history project help students tackle the contextual nature of authority?

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Roger Horowitz

Roger Horowitz    
Associate Director of the Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society, Hagley Museum and Library, and Professor, History

Roger Horowitz is Associate Director of the Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society at the Hagley Museum and Library and Professor of History at the University of Delaware. He has published widely in the area of food history, most recently Kosher USA: How Coke Became Kosher and Other Tales of Modern Food. Oral history has been a part of his research and teaching activities for 30 years. In the mid-1980s he worked on a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to interview workers in the American meatpacking industry. These interviews were a major source for his dissertation, and some excerpts were published in his book, Meatpackers: An Oral History of Black Packinghouse Workers and their Struggle for Racial and Economic Equality. Since then Dr. Horowitz has continued to use oral interviews as part of this research, taught many oral history training sessions, and offered courses on oral history at the University of Delaware, most recently on the history of Newark’s Chrysler assembly plant. He has served as President of Oral History in the Mid-Atlantic Region and as a member of the executive council of the Oral History Association.

L. Rebecca Johnson Melvin    
Librarian and Head, Manuscripts and Archives Department and Curator of the Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Senatorial Papers, University of Delaware Library
L. Rebecca Johnson Melvin is Librarian and Head of the Manuscripts and Archives Department and Curator of the Joseph R. Biden, Jr., senatorial papers at the University of Delaware Library.  She is responsible for all aspects of collection development and of supervising staff involved in managing the primary source collections, which range in format from traditional works on paper to photographs to audio-visual recordings to born-digital media, including web sites.  Her professional and publishing activities reflect experience with congressional collections and political papers, literary manuscripts, women's collections, regional history (Mid-Atlantic), scrapbooks as an archival genre, photography and visual materials in collections, archival description standards, and conservation of archival collections.  She is involved with planning digital initiatives using manuscript collections and outreach for primary sources including instruction, exhibitions, and internships.  She is co-author with UD faculty Deborah C. Andrews and Vicki Cassman of “Learning as Doing: Undergrads Using Special Collections for Conservation and Material Culture Studies,” in Past or Portal: Enhancing Undergraduate Learning through Special Collections and Archives  (ACRL 2012).

How does the creation of broadsides based upon an historical collection help students examine how the format in which information is delivered impacts the way it is received?

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Martha Carothers

Martha Carothers    
Professor, Art & Design

Martha Carothers teaches typography and image in the Visual Communications program, along with book arts. Visual design projects in her courses integrate the plethora of resources in Morris Library Special Collections, University Museums, and Faculty Commons. Carothers is a past chairperson of the Department of Art, former Associate Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, and previous Associate Director of University Undergraduate Studies.

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Curtis Small

Curtis Small    
Assistant Librarian and Coordinator, Public Services Special Collections Department, University of Delaware Library

Curtis Small is Assistant Librarian in the Special Collections department of University of Delaware Library. As coordinator of public services for the department, he handles instruction, reference requests and also coordinates exhibitions. Curtis has a particular interest in the history of the book and in African American print culture. He is also a project member for Colored Conventions, a digital humanities project here at UD. Prior to obtaining an M.L.I.S. degree in 2013 (Simmons College), he earned a Ph.D. in French from New York University, and taught French language and French and Francophone literature at the college level, with a focus on Haitian literature."

 


What unique opportunities to examine audience does the creation of a video present to students?

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Hannah Lee

Hannah Lee    
Senior Assistant Librarian and Program Coordinator, Multimedia Literacy, Multimedia Collections and Services Department, University of Delaware Library

Hannah K. Lee is a senior assistant librarian and program coordinator for the multimedia literacy program in the Student Multimedia Design Center at the University of Delaware Library. Her responsibilities include collaborating with faculty across departments and assisting students in creating multimedia content. She has a B.A. in English with a minor in Education, an M.A. in English with a specialization in Writing Studies, and an M.S. in Library and Information Science, all from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Michael McCamley

Michael McCamley    
Associate Professor, English

Michael McCamley's research and teaching interests include composition pedagogy and theory, literacy studies, writing program administration, and creative writing pedagogy. He has taught courses in first-year composition, honors composition, creative writing, professional writing, and literature, and developed on-line writing courses for distance education. His work has appeared in WPA: Writing Program AdministrationCollege Composition and Communication, and College English, and his creative work has received several honors, including a production by the University of Arizona Theatre Department.


Would the experience of creating a data-layered city map increase students’ ability to analyze aspects of inequality along lines of race and class?

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Jessica Edwards

Jessica Edwards    
Assistant Professor, English

Jessica Edwards, Ph.D. has developed and taught courses in professional writing, critical race studies, and composition studies. Her scholarship considers ways to engage critical race theory, the intersections of race, racism, and power, in writing classrooms. Dr. Edwards was a Faculty Diversity Scholar in 2015 with the Center for Teaching, Assessment, and Learning at UD and her scholarship has appeared in Computers and Composition Online.

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Linda Stein

Linda Stein    
Librarian, Reference and Instructional Services Department, University of Delaware Library

Linda Stein, M.S., M.A. is a Reference and Instructional Services librarian at the University of Delaware Library with subject responsibilities for English and American literature, comparative literature, theatre, and fashion and apparel studies. She has contributed articles on information literacy instruction to Reference Services Review and Research Strategies, and is the co-author of Literary Research and the American Realism and Naturalism Period: Strategies and Sources.

Starting a program to address experiential learning

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 10:20 a.m. – 12 noon, first set of three presentations at this time
Location: 104 Gore Hall 

 

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Carolyn Haines

Carolyn Haines    
Family Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Managed Primary Care Center

Carolyn is a Family Nurse Practitioner with years of primary care experience, and many years experience as an Emergency Department RN. She has both her BSN and MSN from the University of Delaware. Carolyn’s special interests include chronic care management of diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. She also has interest in women’s health as well as health promotion and acute care management. Carolyn also sees patients with a Parkinson's Disease specialist via telemedicine.

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Jacquie Truluck

Jacquie Truluck    
Director of Clinical Education, Communication Sciences and Disorders Program

Jacquie Truluck is the Director of Clinical Education for the brand-new Communication Sciences and Disorders Program. She has opened the Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic on STAR Campus that serves the campus and the community and is in the process of accepting the first class of students to the program. Jacquie brings 15 years of clinical experience and 4 years of managerial experience as a licensed, certified Speech-Language Pathologist. By working in a variety of settings (hospital, school, home and nursing home), Jacquie recognizes the importance of graduate students having the breadth and depth of clinical experiences to represent the profession. Her focus is to build a program that offers life-long learning to support the Speech-Language Pathology profession through coursework, research, supervision and continuing education training.

Physical activity monitoring as a source for engaged learning

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 10:20 a.m. – 12 noon, second of three presentations at this time
Location: 104 Gore Hall 

With recent technology, student physical activity can be recorded, automatically updated to a database, and made available as a resource for teaching, research, and health services. The objective of this pilot/feasibility study, to be completed at the end of the Spring 2016 semester, is to create a resource for engaged, experiential learning that concurrently benefits student wellness.

At the beginning of Fall 2015, Fitbit® Zip™ monitors were distributed to 150 students, including the 25 students in Research Methods (KAAP 400).  This course introduces students to research on health and physical activity, research design, statistical analyses, and scientific writing. The physical activity database served as a resource for in-class exercises and assignments. The subsequent Spring 2016 semester of Research Methods served as a control group, with students using the physical activity database but not contributing to it with their own activity.

The efficacy of this project as a teaching tool will be evaluated through comparisons of class evaluations, custom surveys, and instructor evaluation. The data from this study will determine the feasibility and potential efficacy of our approach. We ambitiously envision a scenario where UD distributes activity monitors to all students upon their arrival, recording activity throughout their student experience and beyond. These data will then be made available for teaching and research across disciplines so that nearly all students interact with the database.

 

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Jeremy Crenshaw

Jeremy Crenshaw    
Assistant Professor, Kinesiology and Applied Physiology

Dr. Crenshaw joined the Department of Kinesiology and Applied Physiology at the University of Delaware in August of 2014.  The long-term goal of his research is to extend the healthspan of patient populations through interventions to reduce the incidence of falls, lessen the severity of fall injury, and enable physical activity.  His studies often employ biomechanical analyses of gait and fall recoveries, and his research is applicable to older adults, individuals with lower-extremity amputations, individuals with chronic stroke, and children with cerebral palsy.  Undergraduate students play an important role in his ongoing studies, and he has a track record of including modern research tools as an interactive part of his teaching efforts.

Two sides of 3D printing

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 10:20 a.m. – 12 noon, third of three presentations at this time
Location: 104 Gore Hall

Anna Wik and Roger Wagner will present two perspectives on 3D visualization tools.

From Anna:
To design a compelling physical space, it is necessary to conceive of and represent an idea in multiple dimensions, planes, and scales. In the course CAD for Site Design, landscape design & civil engineering students use 3D printing technology to create a scaled physical representation of an object of their own design. In this case, the object was a simple site furnishing, which they first draw by hand, then in AutoCAD, and finally modeled using SketchUp before sending it to print.

This iterative design process allows students to repeatedly test their design, as well as investigate the material limitations and use of 3D printing as a tool. 3D printing technology has applications in the world of landscape architecture as a mechanism to design and fabricate complex site furnishings or other hardscape elements. This allows the entire process to stay in the designers hands as designs can be transmitted directly to fabricator, without the use of a contractor or traditional construction documentation.

From Roger:
Digital three dimensional files can be generated by various kinds of microscopy, x-ray scans and scanning devices. This data must be rendered (given a surface), scaled and converted to a file format which is used by 3D printers. Printed 3D models can be exceptionally useful in teaching structure and form where tactile sensations coupled with visual input enhance understanding such as in the anatomical sciences.

 

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Roger Wagner

Roger Wagner    
Professor Emeritus, Biological Sciences

Dr. Wagner is a native of Minnesota and completed his Ph.D. in Cell Biology in 1971. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Yale University Medical School from 71-73 and then joined the faculty at the U. of D. He retired in 2006 but remains active in teaching (Microscopic Anatomy) and collaborative research involving 3D modeling and printing of blood vascular systems and Zooplankton (Radiolarians and Foraminiferans).

[146]

Anna Wik

Anna Wik    
Assistant Professor, Plant & Soil Sciences

Anna Wik is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and a registered landscape architect. She has designed, documented, and managed construction of many landscape projects in the region, working with community and non-profit partners including Philadelphia Parks and Recreation, the Philadelphia Water Department, Longwood Gardens, and numerous community groups. Anna’s courses investigate the relationship between the practice of design and the built environment, and her design focus is on the urban landscape, the creation of equitable public space, and the impact of community partnerships. She is extremely excited about the new professional degree program, the Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture, being offered for the first time in fall of 2016.

GIS workshop for non-GIS researchers [registration required]

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Location: 218 Gore Hall

Special note: This session requires an additional registration.  Registrants will be provided with a personal ArcGIS Online account for the hands-on portion of the workshop.

Most data has a geographic component and visualizing the geographic component may reveal hidden patterns of interest to the researchers. This session will focus on the use of geospatial visualizations and data for project-based learning. Participants will receive a brief introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) and be introduced to ArcGIS Online, a cloud- based data and mapping platform. Participants will have a “hands-on” experience exploring geographic relationships; examining geographic units, data sources; and learning how to create and import CSV files to plot points of interest.

 

[146]

Olena Smith

Olena Smith    
Lead Geospatial Information Consultant, IT Client Support & Services

Olena supports the UD Geospatial Research community as a technological leader and consultant to campus GIS projects in research and administrative realms. She has an M.A. in Geography from Western Michigan University with GIS specialization and has been working with GIS for over 13 years. Over the years Olena has worked in developing and managing servers and databases, and she has extensive experience in creating, managing, and editing ArcGIS data. She is also teaching a GIS course at the university.

[146]

John Stevenson

John Stevenson    
Associate Librarian, University of Delaware Library

John A. Stevenson is an associate librarian in the Student Multimedia Design Center. He has served as selector for spatial data and U.S. government information at the University of Delaware Library since 1990 and in 2012 became selector for the history of science. His expertise includes: Adobe Premier Pro and other multimedia applications; photography; GIS and data acquisition; and the Library’s microform, map, and CD-ROM collections. As an instructor for the multimedia literacy program, he helps faculty to teach their classes the tools they need to create multimedia projects, which include any combination of video, audio, text, and graphics. He has a B.A. in History from Binghamton University and an M.L.S. in Library and Information Science from the University at Buffalo.

Tools and tours (maker workshop 2)

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Start at 1:00 by picking up your tour route in the Gore Rotunda

(Participants can take all three of this week’s maker workshops as a series or participate in any one or two of the sessions independently.)

Maker tour map for June 1

Maker tour map for June 1 (click for Google Map)

This session will explore the tools of making through a tour of the following University of Delaware maker resources.

  • Geotechnology Education Laboratory (GEL) in Penny Hall 203A
    Guide: Michael O’Neal, Geological Sciences
    The availability of open-source micro-controller kits that can be used to build simple digital devices to sense our environment sense has changed how we make observations in our daily life. Whether it’s a sensor that lets you know your basement is flooding or an array of sensors that tells you about global climate change, the technologies behind our observations are very similar at their core. In the Geotechnology Education Laboratory in Penny Hall, users will get a hands-on experience in sensing different aspects of their environment (moisture, temperature, and light) using Arduino micro-controllers.
  • Design Studio (D Studio), 109 Spencer Lab
    Guide: Dustyn Roberts, Mechanical Engineering
    Introduction to laser cutting.
  • BluePrint 3D Studio, 004 Smith Hall 
    Guides: Jevonia Harris & Pavani Vemuri, Academic Technology Services
    Introduction to 3D printing
  • Maker Studio, Studio Arts building (Ashley Pigford, Art & Design)
    Guide: Ashley Pigford, Art & Design
    Introduction to facilities dedicated to developing the next generation of artists, designers, engineers, and entrepreneurs, this facility includes a laser cutting, 3D printing, electronics lab and more.

 

Jevonia Harris    
Digital Media Specialist, IT Academic Technology Services
[146]

Michael O'Neal

Michael O'Neal    
Associate Professor, Geological Sciences

Michael O’Neal's research centers on finding unique ways to observe and characterize human-induced changes to the Earth’s surface, ranging in cause from deforestation to climate change.  He employs technology such as 3D laser scanners to assess landscapes, drone-mounted cameras to collect custom aerial imagery, and environmental sensors to monitor attributes such as temperature, humidity, moisture, and others. Because commercially available technology rarely addresses the specific needs of his projects or field sites, his research group constantly adapts and modifies off-the-shelf equipment to suit their evolving field experiences and research needs.

[146]

Ashley Pigford

Ashley Pigford    
Associate Professor, Art & Design

Ashley John Pigford, Associate Professor of Graphic and Interaction Design at the University of Delaware, applies design thinking to interrogate meaningful relationships between technology, materials and human experience. He received his MFA in Graphic Design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2006 and his BS in Visual Communications from the University of Delaware in 1996. From 1996-2003 He had a successful career as co-founder and Creative Director of a design company in Los Angeles, CA. His notable design work includes motion graphics for Firefly TV series and DMX’s “Who We Be” music video, plus packaging design for Blink 182’s major label debut “Dude Ranch”. He has received research grants from the Center for Creativity, Craft and Design, the University of Delaware and the Creative Arts Council at Brown University, and a State of Delaware Established Artist Fellowship.

[146]

Dustyn Roberts

Dustyn Roberts    
Assistant Professor, Instruction, Mechanical Engineering

Dustyn is a Philadelphia-based engineer and Assistant Professor of Instruction at the University of Delaware, where she teaches classes focused on interdisciplinary design and robotics. Dustyn holds a BS in Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, an MS in Biomechanics & Movement Science from the University of Delaware, and a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from New York University.

Pavani Vemuri    
Graduate Assistant, IT Academic Technology Services

Engaging with what students think: Changing how we teach in response to mid-semester assessments

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 1:00 – 2:00 p.m., first of two presentations at this time
Location: 104 Gore Hall

The reliance on end-of-year student evaluations of teachers has long been lamented. Even teachers with high scores don’t believe that end-of-semester questionnaires often get deeply to the heart of what and how students learn. The delayed and summative nature of these year-end evaluations often fail to improve teaching in meaningful and immediate ways. We will report on our pilot program that uses a quick in-class student survey whose results are made immediately visible with the purpose of engendering a full discussion between students and the observer (a peer teacher from the program). Instructors can then make immediate use of the student feedback and assess the effects of the changes they make to their classrooms. We will discuss ways to improve teaching by using similar formative assessment in single classrooms, program-, or department-wide.

 

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Christine Cucciarre

Christine Cucciarre    
Associate Professor, Associate Director of Composition, English

Christine has been at UD for almost seven years. She teaches ENGL110, Writing the New Media, Introduction to Creative Writing, and several other writing courses. She also facilitates the University's Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) workshops for faculty who are interested in using writing to engage their students. She is the winner of the University's 2016 Excellence Teaching Award and the 2013 College of Arts and Sciences Excellence in Teaching Award. Her interests are in writing pedagogy, labor issues, curricular development, and mentoring college teachers.


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Joe Harris

Joseph Harris    
Professor, Director of Composition, English

Joe Harris came to UD in 2013 as a professor in the English department. Joe teaches courses in composition and critical reading, and, as the director of the composition program, mentor new teachers of writing. Along wth Christine Cucciarre, he has launched a series of efforts that aim to create an ongoing conversation about teaching in our department—encouraging teachers to visit one another's classrooms and to talk about the work they are doing with undergraduates. Joe and Christine will report on one of these projects at the Summer Institute.

Interactive brain lab: Teaching small things to large classes

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m., second presentation at this time
Location: 104 Gore Hall 

The goal of this project is to incorporate more active learning and “hands-on” applications into the undergraduate experience.  This is a difficult task especially in relatively large classes. This session will briefly chronicle an ongoing project aimed at incorporating “hands-on” laboratory experiences into pre-existing traditional lecture-based courses.  In this case, specific examples relate to interactive brain labs in psychology and neuroscience courses, but a similar template could be adopted for any field.  Live demonstrations and student feedback will be provided. Logistical considerations associated with funding, resources, class size, and student engagement will also be discussed.

 

[146]

Eric Roth

Eric Roth    
Assistant Professor, Psychological & Brain Sciences

Eric teaches several psychology and neuroscience courses.  He is also director of the neuroscience major and neuroscience 4+1 master’s program. From rats to mice to reptiles, his research focuses on many aspects of animal behavior.  More specifically, he often take multidisciplinary approaches to investigating the ecological, biological, neurobiological, cognitive, and evolutionary factors driving spatial behavior and social interactions.

Authority vs. trust on the Information Superhighway

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 2:45 – 3:15 p.m.
Location: 218 Gore Hall

Students and novice researchers confronted by the formidable but often unreliable range of information on millions of online sites face serious dilemmas concerning information literacy that have traditionally focused on questions of authority: what makes some sources more authoritative than other, and how to find and identify more and less authoritative sources. This presentation will explore new perspectives on these dilemmas by proposing to change the focus of information literacy from the objects of trust to the subjects who trust. It examines questions of trust—when you need to trust, what can you trust, when you should change what you trust, and, most important, how you should trust—by comparing the ways these questions arise on the information superhighway and the ways they arise in other contexts that turn out to be surprisingly similar.

[146]

Tom Leitch

Thomas Leitch    
Professor of English, Director of the Film Studies Program

 Thomas Leitch is Professor of English and Director of the Film Studies Program. His most recent book, Wikipedia U: Knowledge, Authority, and Liberal Education in the Digital Age, uses the recent emergence of problems concerning the authority of online informational sources like Wikipedia to reopen questions about authority—what gives authorities their authority, what to do when they disagree, whom to believe and why, when to change your mind and why, and how to become an authority yourself—that had long been regarded as settled in the institutions of American education.

Understanding and improving teaching and learning using LMS clickstream data

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 2:15 – 3:15 p.m., first of two presentations at this time
Location: 104 Gore Hall

With recent technology in education, such as learning management systems (LMSs), a large amount of data about learning, learners and learning contexts are being generated. In particular, LMSs collect a large amount of user clickstream data, which indicate users’ detailed activities, such as completing an online quiz, submitting an assignment, and participating in a discussion. Clickstream data often have various proprietary formats and different levels of granularity, which poses significant challenges to related learning data processing, modeling and analysis. In this project, we propose a process mining analysis framework to mine learning clickstream data from learning and teaching process perspective to provide insights on various learning and teaching behavior. Based on the mining results, we aim to provide a number of guidelines and best practices for improving learning and teaching using our LMS at the University of Delaware.

 

[146]

Gang Wang

Gang Wang    
Assistant Professor, Accounting and MIS

Gang Wang is an Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems at the University of Delaware.  He received his Ph.D. degree in Operations and Information Management from the University of Connecticut.  His research interests include social media, e-Business platforms, and firm strategies in e-Markets.  His research has been published in ACM Transactions on Management Information Systems (TMIS) and Journal of Electronic Commerce Research (JECR). He has presented his work at conferences like ICIS and INFORMS.

Collaborating across disciplines: Fun for all!

Date: Wednesday, June 1
Time: 2:15 – 3:15 p.m., second presentation at this time
Location: 104 Gore Hall 

Our session will explain the collaborative project called MSMS, “Making Science Make Sense”. Honors biochem students, video production and journalism students worked together in Fall 2015 to make science make sense. We will offer detail on how we designed the course, implemented it, and the student outcomes. We want to offer advice and encouragement to those working on (and who want to work on) cross-disciplinary collaborations.

 

[146]

Dr. Lydia R. Timmins

Lydia Reeves Timmins    
Asst. Professor, Communication

Professor Timmins earned a PhD in Mass Media and Communication from Temple University in 2010 and a MJ (Master’s of Journalism) from Temple in 2001. She brings more than 20 years of experience as a professional television journalist to the University. She worked in large and small-market TV stations in the Midwest and East Coast of the United States, spending 14 years at Philadelphia’s NBC10 as a producer, writer and digital editor. She has worked on-air and been a director, producer, photographer and editor. She has covered stories including the Clinton impeachment hearings, 9/11, the GOP National Convention in Philadelphia and the Amish school shootings. Her research interests focus on local television news and the impact it has on the audience, news media ethics, digital convergence and the field of telepresence.

[146]

Dr. Jacqueline L. Fajardo

Jackie Fajardo    
Assistant Professor, Chemistry & Biochemistry

Professor Fajardo holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry from Washington State University and a Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical Education from the University of Northern Colorado. In 1996, Dr. Fajardo was awarded an undergraduate research fellowship from the Department of Energy leading to her first authentic undergraduate research experience in the Advanced Organic and Analytical Methods Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA. Upon completion of her Ph.D, Dr. Fajardo began teaching courses in general chemistry, scientific writing, and principles of scientific inquiry. She also collaborated with high school teachers on implementation of active-learning pedagogies within their own classrooms. Since July 2013 she has been an Assistant Professor within the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry at the University of Delaware. Within this capacity, she teaches honors-level integrated general chemistry and strives to bring interdisciplinary relevance to her classrooms.

About computational reasoning

SFI 2016 will address the new Gen Ed objective of computational reasoning (CR). Find our what CR is and how you can infuse it into a course that doesn’t have programming. Dr. Jim Kurose, Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation for the Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), will be our keynote speaker on June 2.

This is how the Faculty Senate is defining the Gen Ed objective of Computational Reasoning.

5b. Reason Computationally: Computational thinking is a problem-solving process that includes (but is not limited to) the following characteristics:

  • Formulating problems in a way that enables us to use a computer and other tools to help solve them;
  • Logically organizing and analyzing data;
  • Representing data through abstractions such a models and simulations;
  • Automating solutions through algorithmic thinking (a series of ordered steps);
  • Identifying, analyzing, and implementing possible solutions with the goal of achieving the most efficient and effective combination of steps and resources;
  • Generalizing and transferring this problem-solving process to a wide variety of problems.

Example: In this course, we will use a big dataset to analyze the spread of the Zika virus and make predictions about its transmittal geographically as well as the economic, social and environmental impact.

Computational thinking for all

Date: Thursday, June 2
Time: 
9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
Location: 
Mitchell Hall Theater

[146]

Jim Kurose

Jim Kurose    
Assistant Director of NSF for the Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), National Science Foundation

Dr. Jim Kurose is the Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) for the Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE). He leads the CISE Directorate, with an annual budget of more than $900 million, in its mission to uphold the nation's leadership in scientific discovery and engineering innovation through its support of fundamental research in computer and information science and engineering and transformative advances in cyberinfrastructure. Dr. Kurose also serves as co-chair of the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council Committee on Technology, facilitating the coordination of networking and information technology research and development efforts across Federal agencies.  Find out more here.

Introducing the Student Success Collaborative

Date: Thursday, June 2
Time: 10:00 – 10:15 a.m.
Location: Mitchell Hall Theatre

An introduction to the new Student Success Collaborative (SSC). SSC is a retention management system that combines technology, research, and predictive analytics to help UD positively inflect degree completion outcomes for at-risk students.

 

[146]

Chris Lucier

Chris Lucier    
Vice President, Enrollment Management

Christopher Lucier is Vice President for Enrollment Management, with responsibility for identifying, attracting, yielding, funding and ensuring the success of UD’s undergraduate students. He oversees the offices of Admissions, the Registrar, Student Financial Services and the University Tutoring Center. Before joining UD in 2014, he was at the University of Vermont, serving as a member of the president’s senior leadership team, helping shape and manage overall university strategy. Reporting to the provost, he was responsible for developing enrollment management strategy and implementing and assessing operational programs to recruit, admit, retain graduate and undergraduate students.

[146]

John Pelesko

John Pelesko    
Interim Assoc Dean, Arts & Sciences

John A. Pelesko is an applied mathematician with a passion for doing and teaching mathematical modeling. At the University of Delaware, he co-founded the “MEC Lab,” an experimental laboratory designed to bring hands-on, real-world, project based experience to mathematics students. He has worked extensively with undergraduate students, graduate students, and K-12 mathematics teachers in exploring the use of projects to teach mathematics. A former chairperson of the Department of Mathematical Sciences, he is presently serving as Interim Associate Dean for the Natural Sciences in the College of Arts & Sciences at the University of Delaware.

[146]

Lynn Okagaki

Lynn Okagaki    
Deputy Provost, Academic Affairs

Lynn Okagaki is Deputy Provost for Academic Affairs, with responsibility for undergraduate academic affairs. She works with the Provost on the administration of academic policies and faculty appointment and promotion. She also works with the Provost to establish global collaborations and partnerships to extend the University's global role, leadership, geographic presence and visibility.

Build your idea (maker workshop 3)

Date: Thursday, June 2
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., with a break for lunch
Location: based on your team selection, choose from the list below.

Maker activity map for June 2

Activity map for June 2 (click for Google Map)

Following up on yesterday’s tour of maker facilities, participants will build using one of four activities.

Laser cutting. Design Studio (D Studio), 109 Spencer Lab (Dustyn Roberts, Mechanical Engineering)

3D printing. BluePrint 3D Studio, Smith Hall (Jevonia Harris & Pavani Vemuri, IT Academic Technology Services)

Arduino sensors & motors. “The Pit”, 134 Spencer Lab. (Michael O’Neal, Geological Sciences and Ashley Pigford, Art & Design)

References:
Arduino IDE Software

FTDI Drivers

Spark Fun Inventor’s Kit

Build a push-button controller, a variation of the “wireless music veto button”. Faculty will build a multi-purpose “action button” that can map to a key or series of keystrokes/macros in a laptop or phone. Some faculty may choose to create a video recording button, or PowerPoint slide changer, or something else. Faculty Commons, 116 Pearson Hall (Bryan Givens and Foster Schucker, Barrel of Makers)

 

Jevonia Harris    
Digital Media Specialist, IT Academic Technology Services
Brian Givens    
, Barrel of Makers, Inc.

Find out more about this organization at the Barrel of Makers web site.

[146]

Michael O'Neal

Michael O'Neal    
Associate Professor, Geological Sciences

Michael O’Neal's research centers on finding unique ways to observe and characterize human-induced changes to the Earth’s surface, ranging in cause from deforestation to climate change.  He employs technology such as 3D laser scanners to assess landscapes, drone-mounted cameras to collect custom aerial imagery, and environmental sensors to monitor attributes such as temperature, humidity, moisture, and others. Because commercially available technology rarely addresses the specific needs of his projects or field sites, his research group constantly adapts and modifies off-the-shelf equipment to suit their evolving field experiences and research needs.

[146]

Ashley Pigford

Ashley Pigford    
Associate Professor, Art & Design

Ashley John Pigford, Associate Professor of Graphic and Interaction Design at the University of Delaware, applies design thinking to interrogate meaningful relationships between technology, materials and human experience. He received his MFA in Graphic Design from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2006 and his BS in Visual Communications from the University of Delaware in 1996. From 1996-2003 He had a successful career as co-founder and Creative Director of a design company in Los Angeles, CA. His notable design work includes motion graphics for Firefly TV series and DMX’s “Who We Be” music video, plus packaging design for Blink 182’s major label debut “Dude Ranch”. He has received research grants from the Center for Creativity, Craft and Design, the University of Delaware and the Creative Arts Council at Brown University, and a State of Delaware Established Artist Fellowship.

[146]

Dustyn Roberts

Dustyn Roberts    
Assistant Professor, Instruction, Mechanical Engineering

Dustyn is a Philadelphia-based engineer and Assistant Professor of Instruction at the University of Delaware, where she teaches classes focused on interdisciplinary design and robotics. Dustyn holds a BS in Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, an MS in Biomechanics & Movement Science from the University of Delaware, and a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from New York University.

Foster Schucker    
, Barrel of Makers, Inc.

Find out more about this organization at the Barrel of Makers web site.

Pavani Vemuri    
Graduate Assistant, IT Academic Technology Services

Infusing computational reasoning into the curriculum

Date: Thursday, June 2
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 12 noon
Location: 208 Gore Hall

Presenters:

[146]

Chrystalla Mouza

Chrystalla Mouza    
Associate Professor, School of Education

Dr. Chrystalla Mouza is an associate professor of Instructional Technology. She earned an Ed.D., M.Ed., and M.A. in Instructional Technology and Media from Teachers College, Columbia University and completed post-doctoral work at the Educational Testing Service (ETS). She has expertise in the learning sciences including teacher learning, applications of technology in K-12 classrooms, and teaching and learning outcomes in ubiquitous and mobile computing environments. She is a principal investigator on several projects funded by the Delaware Department of Education to improve teacher quality in high-need schools, a co- PI on a National Science Foundation grant that will provide teacher professional development in computational thinking, and the learning scientist on two National Science Foundation projects that seek to improve climate change education by providing effective professional development to teachers. Dr. Mouza is the recipient of the 2010 Distinguished Research in Teacher Education Award from the Association of Teacher Educators and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education.

[146]

Lori Pollock

Lori Pollock    
Professor, Computer & Information Sciences

Lori Pollock is a Professor in the Department of Computer and Information Sciences at the University of Delaware.  Her research currently focuses on program analysis for building better software maintenance tools, optimizing compilers for modern computer architectures, and software testing. Her research has been continuously supported through the years by numerous grants from the National Science Foundation and the Army Research Laboratory.  Lori Pollock teaches courses primarily in compiler construction, parallel programming, automatic program analysis and transformation, and software testing. She was awarded the University of Delaware's Excellence in Teaching Award in 2001.

[146]

Zoubeida Dagher

Zoubeida Dagher    
Professor, School of Education

Dr. Zoubeida R. Dagher is professor of science education at the School of Education and a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Science, Ethics, and Public Policy, University of Delaware. She is currently serving as President of the International History and Philosophy of Science Teaching [IHPST] Group. Her research interests include the nature of scientific methods and practices and representations of scientific epistemology in science curriculum and instruction. Dr. Dagher has coauthored a book titled: Reconceptualizing the Nature of Science for Science Education: Scientific Knowledge, Practices and Other Family Categories (2014).

Moderators:

Kevin Guidry    
Senior Research Analyst, Center for Teaching and Assessment of Learning

Kevin R. Guidry is Senior Research Analyst at the UD Center for Teaching and Assessment of Learning. He works with faculty on exploring new pedagogies and improving existing teaching practices to enhance student learning. Guidry specializes in assessment of student learning and survey methodology having worked on teaching, learning, and assessment research and practice at levels ranging from individual courses to projects spanning hundreds of colleges and universities.

[146]

Kathy Pusecker

Kathy Pusecker    
Acting Director, Center for Teaching and Assessment of Learning

Kathleen Langan Pusecker is the Acting Director of the Center for Teaching and Assessment of Learning at the University of Delaware. She establishes and maintains relationships with faculty members, Chairs, Deans, and other senior internal constituencies and external agencies, to include national accreditation bodies. She also serves on the Faculty Senate General Education Committee that passed new goals in November 2014. Her responsibilities include assisting UD in addressing the Middle States Commission on Higher Education accreditation standards related to the assessment of general education and student learning. She helps to select and develop tools and oversees their implementation and the analysis and reporting of data. Pusecker establishes critical communications and coordination with internal constituencies and University senior decision-makers to address issues that may affect execution/implementation of University strategic plans, policies and programs. In addition, Pusecker publishes the reports of student learning outcomes for the College Portrait.

 

Mindfulness in academia: Refining awareness to foster learner engagement

Date: Thursday, June 2
Time: 1:00 – 1:45 p.m.
Location: 104 Gore Hall

Session recording and presentation slides are available here.

Closing plenary session
Based on an emerging body of research in the area of Mindfulness in Education, participants will learn to develop and capitalize on both their own and student attentional skills for success in and outside the classroom.

 

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Michael Mackenzie

Michael Mackenzie    
Director of the Applied Health Behavior Science Laboratory and Assistant Professor, Behavioral Health & Nutrition / Human Development & Family Studies

Michael Mackenzie is the Director of the Applied Health Behavior Science Laboratory (AHBSL), Program Director of the Graduate Certificate in Health Coaching, and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Behavioral Health and Nutrition, College of Health Sciences, at the University of Delaware. He holds a MSc in Counseling Psychology, PhD in Health & Exercise Psychology, and has maintained his registration as a Clinical Counsellor in British Columbia, Canada. Our lab utilizes mixed methods and community-engaged research approaches to investigate how engagement in physical activity and mind-body practices interacts with physiological, psychosocial, and phenomenological characteristics to influence health behaviors and outcomes. Ultimately, this innovative translational research approach aids in the development, implementation, and dissemination of state-of-the-art community-based health behavior interventions, programming, and education. Our mission is to advance public health and medical care models to better include health behavior science as standard to health promotion and chronic disease prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation.

Five minutes of fame

Date: Thursday, June 2
Time: 
2:15 – 3:15 p.m.
Location: 
104 Gore Hall

Five Minutes of Fame is a fast-paced session where you can pick up ten exciting ideas, technologies, projects, or resources, all in five minute doses. Presentations can come from any faculty or staff participant at this year’s institute. Want to be considered for this year’s list? E-mail your idea to faculty-commons@udel.edu


My UD Business
Get the mug! Get the scoop. Find out what My UD Business can do for you.

Joy Lynam    
Director, IT Web Development


CritBoard in Canvas
A digital critboard within Canvas that facilitates the project-based learning critique and tangibly engages students in the process.

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Five cool things you can do in Canvas

Mathieu Plourde    
IT Project Leader I, IT Academic Technology Services


Mini Maker Fair 2017

Tanya Looney    
Science Program Manager, Hagley Museum & Library


Canvas Threadz
Threadz is a data visualization tool, and the data for this demonstration will come from SFI2016 Canvas Discussion posts. For best results in this demo, all SFI participants should login to Canvas and make multiple discussion posts!

Becky Kinney    
Educational Technology Consultant II, IT Academic Technology Services


iSchool Animation

Nico Carver    
Assistant Librarian, University of Delaware Library


Maker track participants report on what they made.

Mobile photo safari participants report on what they produced.