UD’s Epps Named American Physical Society Fellow

Thomas H. Epps, III was named an American Physical Society Fellow

Chemical engineering and materials science professor joins the top 0.5 percent of society members

Thomas H. Epps, III, the Thomas & Kipp Gutshall Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Delaware, has been named a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). No more than one-half of one percent of APS members are elected to Fellow Status. Fellows have made significant contributions to the field of physics through research, applications, teaching, or participation in society activities. “It is a great honor to be elected as an APS Fellow,” said Epps. ”Several of my colleagues at UD are APS Fellows, along with many people who I admire in the polymer physics community. It is a great privilege to become a part of this esteemed group in physics. I am extremely grateful to all of my students, postdocs, and collaborators who have contributed to my activities.” Darrin Pochan, chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Eric Furst, chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, nominated Epps for this honor. “Prof. Epps’ accomplishments in the research and engineering of block-copolymers and his service and leadership in the American Physical Society forum make him exceptionally qualified for this honor,” said Furst. “He is an extraordinary researcher and educator whose work has had a major impact on macromolecular and soft matter science and engineering.”

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Modeling New Materials

Arthi Jayaraman recently received a grant to build predictive molecular models of soft materials

UD Engineer Arthi Jayaraman Uncovers Molecular Mysteries

When scientists develop brand new materials, they must precisely determine the ingredients, quantities, and processing methods to use. It’s kind of like creating a recipe. Before spending time and money to test these recipes in a lab, scientists can first use computer simulations to see how the molecules in the ingredients will behave under changing conditions. However, as researchers invent increasingly innovative and complex materials, they need models and simulations that run for longer time scales, and offer resolutions at multiple length scales, than what is available. “New and better models are needed to address current challenges in materials design,” said Arthi Jayaraman, an associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Delaware. Jayaraman is building better models right here at UD. For this research, she along with collaborators Ryan Hayward of University of Massachusetts Amherst and Paul Butler of National Institutes of Standards and Technology have been awarded a $726,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

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Milestone Anniversary

Stan Sandler of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering has served 50 years on the UD faculty.

Chemical engineering’s Stan Sandler reaches 50-year mark as UD faculty member

Stan Sandler usually takes the steps to get to his second-floor office in the University of Delaware’s Colburn Lab. But today he’s taking the elevator because he’s hauling two black bags filled with heavy books — books that will be added to a growing pile destined to be shipped to developing countries including Nigeria and Ethiopia. It’s easy to accumulate a lot of books over the course of an academic career, especially one that spans half a century, and, even with 150 or 200 books already boxed up, the shelves in Sandler’s office are far from empty. While Sandler is proud of those awards — which include membership in the National Academy of Engineering and being named one of the top 30 chemical engineering authors by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers — there are other things for which he would like to be remembered. The first, he says, is the many books he has authored, including two new ones in just the past two years. “One of my texts is now in its fifth edition,” he says. “It not only changed what we do here but also has had an impact on instruction around the world.” He’s also proud of the accomplishments of his students, his efforts to promote the use of computers in chemical engineering instruction, and his initiation of a conference series in thermodynamics that was supposed to be a one-time event but so far has had a 40-year run. The most recent meeting was last year in Porto, Portugal.

Now the Henry Belin du Pont Chair of Chemical Engineering at UD, Sandler has served as department chair and as interim dean of the College of Engineering, but his heart lies with research and teaching, not with administration.

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1st Prize in the DPOLY Poster Session at 2017 APS

Cameron (left) is presented with the award by Professor Ryan Hayward of the University of Massachusetts

Congratulations to Cameron Shelton

Cameron M. Shelton, graduate student at the University of Delaware, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, was awarded 1st prize in the Division of Polymer Physics (DPOLY) poster session at the March 13-17, 2017 American Physical Society (APS) meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. Cameron received his award from Professor Ryan Hayward, Polymer Science & Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

View 2017 DPOLY March Program

Read more about the American Physical Society Division of Polymer Physics

Epps Group Selected by Macromolecular Chemistry & Physics Journal

Epps Research Group Paper

Macromolecular Chemistry & Physics Journal 5/2017 selected a recent paper by the Epps Research Group for cover art for Volume 218, Number 5 issued on March 6, 2017 authored by:

Melody A. Morris
Thomas E. Gartner III
Thomas H. Epps III

Front Cover: This image depicts four strategies that the Epps group has employed to tune the nanostructure, properties, processability, and function of block polymer materials. Clockwise from top left they are: tapered block polymer interfaces, chlorosilane modification of silicon substrates, dopants for lithium-ion battery electrolytes, and solvent vapor annealing of block polymer films combined with in situ characterization. Further details can be found in the article by Melody A. Morris, Thomas E. Gartner, III, Thomas H. Epps, III in the article number 1600513.