1st Prize in the DPOLY Poster Session at 2017 APS

Cameron (left) is presented with the award by Professor Ryan Hayward of the University of Massachusetts

Congratulations to Cameron Shelton

Cameron M. Shelton, graduate student at the University of Delaware, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, was awarded 1st prize in the Division of Polymer Physics (DPOLY) poster session at the March 13-17, 2017 American Physical Society (APS) meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. Cameron received his award from Professor Ryan Hayward, Polymer Science & Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

View 2017 DPOLY March Program

Read more about the American Physical Society Division of Polymer Physics

Epps Group Selected by Macromolecular Chemistry & Physics Journal

Epps Research Group Paper

Macromolecular Chemistry & Physics Journal 5/2017 selected a recent paper by the Epps Research Group for cover art for Volume 218, Number 5 issued on March 6, 2017 authored by:

Melody A. Morris
Thomas E. Gartner III
Thomas H. Epps III

Front Cover: This image depicts four strategies that the Epps group has employed to tune the nanostructure, properties, processability, and function of block polymer materials. Clockwise from top left they are: tapered block polymer interfaces, chlorosilane modification of silicon substrates, dopants for lithium-ion battery electrolytes, and solvent vapor annealing of block polymer films combined with in situ characterization. Further details can be found in the article by Melody A. Morris, Thomas E. Gartner, III, Thomas H. Epps, III in the article number 1600513.

Jayaraman Research Group Selected by Soft Matter Journal

Jayaraman Research Group Paper

Soft Matter Journal selected a recent paper by the Jayaraman Research Group for cover art for Volume 13, Number 16 issued on April 28, 2017, Pages 2895-3062 authored by:

Joshua Condon
Tyler Martin
Professor Arthi Jayaraman

The Jayaraman Research Group is in the Center for Molecular & Engineering Thermodynamics of the Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering. Jayaraman Group research focuses on the Theory and Simulations of Polymers and Biomaterials. Recent projects include: Polymer Grafted Nanoparticles Based Polymer Nanocomposites, Conjugated Polymer Materials for Organic Electronics, and Nucleic Acids and Peptide based Biomaterials.

SXSW Research Video

Shear thickening fluid has many applications, including in needlestick-resistant surgical gloves

UD professor featured in American Chemical Society video at SXSW

The hipsters, thought leaders and innovators attending the South by Southwest (SXSW) Festival in Austin, Texas, this week are being introduced to some University of Delaware innovation that’s designed to help people both here on the ground and rocketing off into space. In a video being premiered by the American Chemical Society at SXSW, UD professor Norman Wagner and his interdisciplinary team’s work with shear thickening fluids is showcased — in applications ranging from bullet-proof vests, to needlestick-resistant surgical gloves, concussion-resistant helmets, next-generation prosthetics and even spacesuits. As Wagner explains, shear thickening fluids are “field-responsive” materials meaning that the harder you push on them, the harder they push back. His team’s work to harness this unique capability and provide protection where it currently doesn’t exist — to first responders to doctors to astronauts — is highlighted in one of three short-form documentaries produced by the American Chemical Society. The series illustrates the importance of chemistry in innovation and the cross-collaboration and interdisciplinary nature of today’s scientific endeavors.

In addition to Wagner, who is the Unidel Robert L. Pigford Chaired Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at UD, and co-founder of the startup company STF Technologies, the video includes Richard Dombrowski, co-founder of STF Technologies, and research assistant Eric Hobbs, who both received their bachelor’s degrees in chemical engineering from UD, Jehnae Linkins, doctoral student in biomechanics and movement science, and postdoctoral researcher Dr. Maria Katzarova. Eric Wetzel, research scientist and a key partner at the Army Research Laboratory, and John Horne, president of Independence Prosthetics-Orthotics, also are included.

The American Chemical Society, which is participating in the expo hall at SXSW for the first time this year, has more than 157,000 members around the globe. The videos and other information are being presented on its new community engagement platform, the ACS Xchange, which is open to the public. Watch the UD Team’s Video

EVA Suit MMOD Protection Using STF-ArmorTm, Self-Healing Polymers

NASA EPSCoR Stimuli Highlight 2016-2017: Melisssa Gordon and Prof. Norman Wagner of the University of Delaware, and Willie Williams, NASA, Johnson Space Center

University of Delaware/NASA Johnson Space Center, Human Exploration & Operations and Space Technology Mission Directorates

As NASA propels science, technology and exploration forward, the need for spacesuits composed of lightweight, long-lived and flexible materials becomes increasingly urgent. In space, micrometeorites and orbital debris (MMOD) can compromise the air barrier of a space suit, causing pinhole punctures that are difficult to identify and repair. Our work focuses on developing healing materials capable of regenerating functionality after damage. In our approach, we are synthesizing fundamentally new, self-healing polymers in which a dynamic bond is built into the network architecture to enable a lightactivated secondary polymerization, increasing the modulus by two orders of magnitude and strengthening the network by over 100%. This work has been recently published in Advanced Materials (2015, 27, 8007–8010). We demonstrated that the material can be completely severed and then remended with increased material strength and no visible scarring. Moreover, our approach confines healing and strengthening to the damaged area; thus, an EVA suit could maintain flexibility in unaffected areas. By developing healing polymer networks, the safety and service lifetime of the material are enhanced. This material was selected by NASA to be tested on the exterior of the International Space Station in 2017 to test its response the extreme environment of outer space. See article…

Stimuli is a summary collection of college and university basic research and technology development reports impacting NASA’s earth science, aviation, and human and robotic deep space exploration programs. This document addresses research which is relevant to NASA’s mission, and currently administered by the agency’s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research.