Catalysis Science & Technology

Cover highlight: Fe/γ-Al2O3 and Fe–K/γ-Al2O3 as reverse water-gas shift catalysts

July 15, 2016–The reduction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen into carbon monoxide and water is becoming increasingly important for its potential application in energy storage for intermittent energy sources such as wind and solar energy. CO can be used to store into chemical bonds electrical energy when energy production is in excess of energy demand, and transformed back in to electrical energy when energy demand surpasses production. Very recently Jason Loiland and Matthew Wulfers working with Prof. Raul Lobo identified supported iron oxides on alumina (Fe/gamma-Al2O3) as a very effective and selective catalyst for this so-called reverse water gas shift reaction (RWGS). The catalyst is inexpensive to prepare and very stable under typical reaction conditions. Their report has been recently highlighted in the cover of ‘Catalysis Science and Technology’ (Catal. Sci. Technol., 2016, 6, 5221-5221 DOI: 10.1039/C6CY90070D).

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EXEMPLARY ACHIEVEMENTS

Jonathan Rosen (center) receives the Allan P. Colburn Prize in Engineering and Mathematical Sciences from Provost Domenico Grasso during the 2016 Doctoral Hooding Convocation. Rosen's dissertation chair, Feng Jiao, is on the left.

Jonathan Rosen (center) receives the Allan P. Colburn Prize in Engineering and Mathematical Sciences from Provost Domenico Grasso during the 2016 Doctoral Hooding Convocation. Rosen’s dissertation chair, Feng Jiao, is on the left.

Students honored for dissertations, prof for exceptional mentoring

June 2, 2016–As the University of Delaware recognized more than 160 students who completed their doctoral studies at the Doctoral Hooding Convocation held May 27 on The Green, top prizes went to six students and one faculty member for exceptional achievements.

UDaily provides this collection of Provost Domenico Grasso’s remarks on each prize winner…

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HIGHLY TUNED CATALYTIC CONTROLS

Joe Fox (right), professor of chemistry and biochemistry, collaborated with three UD colleagues on the work that has produced an important new catalytic tool. They are (from left) Joel Rosenthal (chemistry and biochemistry); Colin Thorpe (chemistry and biochemistry); and Xinqiao Jia (materials science and engineering).

Joe Fox (right), professor of chemistry and biochemistry, collaborated with three UD colleagues on the work that has produced an important new catalytic tool. They are (from left) Joel Rosenthal (chemistry and biochemistry); Colin Thorpe (chemistry and biochemistry); and Xinqiao Jia (materials science and engineering).

UD researchers sharpen time, spatial control of reactions

June 2, 2016–You could think of bioorthogonal chemistry as a discreet valet or concierge that steers two world leaders to a private meeting without making noise or trouble along the way.

The valet is a catalyst of sorts, arranging the meeting to expedite a result that would not otherwise happen.

Bioorthogonal chemistry produces targeted reactions within living organisms that would not happen naturally. It is used in nuclear medicine, in imaging of cells, and in creating materials or adjusting the properties of materials already present.

Now, the collaborative work of four University of Delaware professors has given the valet an upgraded GPS and a turbo-charged engine, allowing for faster, more precise reactions that can be triggered by light or an enzyme and will have even more implications for medicine, engineering and other sciences. Their achievement is described in a newly published article in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

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